Montreal Passenger Lists 1891-1956

Harbour Scene at Montreal.

Harbour Scene at Montreal. The full development of Montreal is hampered to some extent by the lack of attention given to the St Lawrence by the Dominion Government. It is pleasing to know that this is to be changed, the Shipping Federation of Canada having received an assurance that the work of deepening the ship channel to 40 ft . with a width necessary to accommodate the growing size of ocean steamships. is to be proceeded with. The Syren & Shipping Illustrated, 24 June 1908. GGA Image ID # 147322257a

Digitized Passenger Lists for the Port of Montreal

 

Montréal is a city in the Canadian province of Quebec. It is the largest city in the province, the second-largest in the country (after Toronto) and the fifteenth-largest in North America.

The city proper covers most of the Island of Montreal at the confluence of the Saint Lawrence and Ottawa Rivers. The port of Montreal lies at one end of the Saint Lawrence Seaway, which is the river gateway that stretches from the Great Lakes into the Atlantic Ocean.

The Harbour at Montreal, The Great Port on the St. Lawrence.

The Harbour at Montreal, The Great Port on the St. Lawrence. Canada Today, 1913. GGA Image ID # 14c763b1d2

Although closed to navigation over four months of each year by the freezing of the St. Lawrence River, Montreal far surpasses other Canadian ports in volume and value of traffic. Its favored geographic location, at the head of ocean navigation on St. Lawrence and the foot of inland navigation of the Great Lakes, has made this port the converging point both for railroads and for ocean steamers and Great Lakes vessels.

Therefore, it is an economical and convenient transshipping center for exports from and imports to both eastern and central Canada. Montreal's grain export trade holds the first rank among world ports: millions of bushels are transshipped annually from lake and rail curriers to ocean steamers destined principally to Europe.

Montreal's port commands the shortest and cheapest trade route to Great Britain and has behind it possibilities for a Canal and River system for tapping the trade of almost the entire continent. It is a national duty that full advantage be taken of this geographical position to build up an all-Canadian water route between the Great West and Montreal capable of handling Canada's exports and imports through Canadian seaports and also enabling us to compete successfully for the American trade from the Great Lake ports, which are tributary to this route.

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