Naples, Italy Passenger Lists 1894-1954

Naples, Italy Showing the Harbor circa 1906.

Naples, Italy Showing the Harbor circa 1906. GGA Image ID # 1766ff04b6

Passenger Lists available from the GG Archives from the Port of Naples, Italy. Organized by Date of Departure, Steamship Line, Steamship or Ocean Liner, Class of Passengers, Route, and the Ship's Captain.

Digitized Passenger Lists for the Port of Naples

 

Naples is the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy. The port of Naples is one of the most important in Europe and has the world's second-highest passenger flow level, after the port of Hong Kong.

During the early 20th century, efforts to industrialize the city were likewise hampered by administrative corruption and a lack of infrastructure. Facing a slumping economy, many poorer Neapolitans emigrated northwards or headed overseas to the United States and Argentina.

Naples and Genoa have all the natural advantages required for navigation by the largest vessels, but at each, the volume of trade has mostly outgrown facilities for handling goods.

Furthermore, this is true as regards merchandise for transportation by both the railroad and ocean lines. There are few piers at Naples at which vessels may discharge and load cargo, warehouses for safe storage are inadequate in number and limited in capacity, mechanical agencies for handling cargo are insufficient, and the manual force employed is not entirely efficient.

These deficiencies are augmented because Naples is simply a port of call, vessels touching there remaining as a rule no longer than twenty-four hours to discharge or take on passengers and cargo.

On the westward voyage, it frequently happens that exigencies arise, which shorten the stay at Naples, and in such cases, vessels proceed to Genoa with cargo that could not be discharged at the former port.

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