Sunkist Fruit

Picked Ripe from the Orange Groves of Sunny California--These Big, Delicious, Firm, Tender-Meated Seedless Navels

Trainloads are arriving daily in all markets, and California never sent better fruit. Heavy and luscious with a sparkling juice—the most healthful of all fruits. In millions of homes Sunkist Oranges are now the standard fruit, served every day the year 'round.

They are on the breakfast table, in handy frail dishes between meals, and in salads and desserts.

Serve them daily in your home. There are scores of tempting recipes Write for our beautiful book. "Sunkist Salads and Desserts'*

Features of Sunkist

Sunkist Navel Oranges are seedless and seedless oranges are most convenient for home uses.

They peel freely. The sections are easily separated. The interior fibrous partitions being tissue thin, and tender. Quickly give way under fork or spoon. They are never tough. You ran slice them wafer-thin or eat them whole like other fruits.

You'll eat twice as many oranges—and use them every day—when you know all that California Sunkist Seedless Navel Oranges offer.

Sunkist Lemons

Sunkist Lemons are practically seedless—juicy and hill-flavored.
Serve them with your oysters—fish—meats—and tea. These are beautiful lemons. Sunkist sliced, quartered, or halved make a most enticing garnish.

Use pure Sunkist Lemon juice in every dish that now calls for doubtful vinegar. Employ Sunkist Lemons in 86 different ways. Lean what lemons can do to lessen the labors of housekeeping.

 

The Beauty, the Tenderness, the Healthfulnessm, the Deliciousness of Sunkist California Seedless Navel Oranges. The Ladies' Home Journal, April 1916.

The Beauty, the Tenderness, the Healthfulnessm, the Deliciousness of Sunkist California Seedless Navel Oranges. The Ladies' Home Journal, April 1916. GGA Image ID # 167bd13aa1

Every-Hour Uses for Good Lemons - Sunkist California's Selected Practically Seedless Lemons. The Ladies' Home Journal, May 1916.

Every-Hour Uses for Good Lemons - Sunkist California's Selected Practically Seedless Lemons. The Ladies' Home Journal, May 1916. GGA Image ID # 167c299d2f

Sunkist Valencia Oranges, Far More than just "Delicious."

Sunkist Valencia Oranges, Far More than just "Delicious." The Ladies' Home Journal, August 1916. GGA Image ID # 167c2f0249

Suggestions for Garnishing with Sunkist Lemons - The California Fruit Growers Exchange. The Ladies' Home Journal, December 1916.

Suggestions for Garnishing with Sunkist Lemons - The California Fruit Growers Exchange. The Ladies' Home Journal, December 1916. GGA Image ID # 167ce8659b

Luscious Salads That Save Desserts. Both Men and Children Like Them. Sunkist Uniformly Good Oranges. Good Housekeeping Magazine, July 1920.

Luscious Salads That Save Desserts. Both Men and Children Like Them. Sunkist Uniformly Good Oranges. Good Housekeeping Magazine, July 1920. GGA Image ID # 167d287908

The Best Beauty Shops Rinse With Lemon... Why? California Sunkist Uniformly Good Lemons. The Ladies' Home Journal, January 1921.

The Best Beauty Shops Rinse With Lemon... Why? California Sunkist Uniformly Good Lemons. The Ladies' Home Journal, January 1921. GGA Image ID # 167d4ca2c4

Tea With Lemon for Better Style. California Sunkist Uniformly Good Lemons. Buy them by the Dozen. Woman's Home Campanion, January 1921.

Tea With Lemon for Better Style. California Sunkist Uniformly Good Lemons. Buy them by the Dozen. Woman's Home Campanion, January 1921. GGA Image ID # 167ddf543e

Five-Minute Lunches For Busy Women. Delicious-Healthful-Quick. Sunkist Uniformly Good Oranges. Woman's Home Companion, March 1921.

Five-Minute Lunches For Busy Women. Delicious-Healthful-Quick. Sunkist Uniformly Good Oranges. Woman's Home Companion, March 1921. GGA Image ID # 167de96862

How Great Hotels Serve Sunkist Oranges. Sunkist, Uniformly Good Oranges. Woman's Home Companion, May 1921.

How Great Hotels Serve Sunkist Oranges. Sunkist, Uniformly Good Oranges. Woman's Home Companion, May 1921. GGA Image ID # 167dfbe899

Now New Fame has come to Lemonade. Vitamines for Summer -- In Summer's Most Delicious Drink. California Sunkist Lemons, Uniformly Good. Buy them by the Dozen. Woman's Home Companion, August 1923.

Now New Fame has come to Lemonade. Vitamines for Summer -- In Summer's Most Delicious Drink. California Sunkist Lemons, Uniformly Good. Buy them by the Dozen. Woman's Home Companion, August 1923. GGA Image ID # 167dfc6606

Sunkist Oranges and Lemons

IT is interesting to note the development of the orange as an article of the daily diet since the American wife and mother has become the best educated woman in the world with regard to foods and their values.

Oranges once were considered a luxury. There were very few of them produced and, therefore, they were usually high in price. But scientists, farmers and busi' ness men took up the culture of oranges and as time passed this incomparable fruit became less expensive to buy and better to eat as well.

Then came Sunkist—a name given to a superior grade by a great California co-operative organization of several thousand (now 11,000) orange growers who adopted standards—for their own and the consumer's benefit—that would insure a regular, uniform, better eating quality in the fruit so designated.

There are ten sizes of Sunkist Oranges—all of the same eating quality—and a variety of prices according to sizes which place Sunkist within the reach of every class of home.

"Sunkist" oranges are always in demand everywhere because of their delightful flavor, and handy convenience. Since they are picked ripe every day in the year and shipped immediately to every part of the country in fast moving refrigerator cars they reach the market as luscious and fresh as when they were picked from the trees.

Due to the fact that California has succeeded in producing a variety of orange that matures in the winter and another that matures in the summer, and because of the variations in climate in different parts of the wide area in which California oranges are grown, "Sunkist" oranges are maturing at all times of the year; Sunkist Navel oranges are in the market in the winter and spring; Sunkist Valencia oranges in the summer and fall.

California's Sunkist Lemons are standardized in substantially the same manner as Sunkist Oranges.

Lemon trees never rest. Each tree exhibits at one time fruit in all stages of development, from the bud to the mature lemon. The fruit is clipped off when it reaches the required size. There is therefore never a day in the year when fresh Sunkist lemons are not on the market.

Juicy, tart, full-flavored, they are ready for use in the ice-cold lemonade season of midsummer as well as in the cake and pudding days of midwinter and every day in between. The waxy skin of Sunkist lemons proves an appetizing garnish for all sorts of foods; while their piquant flavor and the stimulus which they furnish to good digestion make them an essential accompaniment to fish, many sorts of meats and vegetables and an invariable ingredient of good salad dressings. For the housewife who observes the modern all-the-year- round canning season, these good lemons are indispensable because of their natural pectin content.

The importance of serving fresh fruit every day in the year cannot be over-emphasized, not only from the standpoint of flavor but also of healthfulness.

At breakfast, Sunkist oranges may be served plain or in combination with other fruits; a glass of Sunkist orange juice is the best possible beginning when there's a day's work ahead. Salad, the ideal luncheon dish, presents infinite possibilities for the uses of Sunkist oranges. At dinner in salad or dessert Sunkist oranges may appear in any number of delicious forms.

Refreshments at afternoon and evening parties must be charming in appearance and flavor; but must not be too substantial. Fruit salads and frozen desserts made with oranges or lemons meet these requirements best. Eating the bedtime orange is a habit which is worth acquiring for its valuable aid to health.

California Fruit Growers Exchange

THE California Fruit Growers Exchange (growers and shippers of Sunkist Oranges and Lemons) is a non-profit co-operative organization of 11,000 growers. It exists solely for the purpose of marketing most economically the oranges and lemons produced by its grower members and to maintain the high standards of quality for which the name "Sunkist" has been made famous.

Only growers are members of this Exchange. The Exchange makes no profits and no dividends are paid on any stock for there is no
stock. The cost of marketing the fruit is pro-rated and each grower receives his proportionate share of the receipts from sales.

To be marketed in Sunkist wrappers, oranges must be practically free from blemish, of good color for the variety, and must meet the "8 to 1 minimum standard of ripeness"—that is, the percentage of sugar and soluble solids present must be at least eight times the percentage of the natural fruit acid.

The most scrupulous care is used in handling Sunkist fruit so that it may reach the market in the best possible condition. The oranges and lemons are not picked or pulled from the trees; the stem of each is carefully clipped close enough to the fruit so that no projection is left to injure other fruit when packed for shipment. All pickers wear gloves to avoid any possibility of injuring the skin of the fruit.

The fruit is hauled to the packing houses on motor trucks or spring wagons and is carefully protected from the sun by tarpaulins. Here it is sent through huge washing machines, ending with a cold shower before passing to the dryer. It is then graded, wrapped in clean tissue and packed for shipment.

The California Fruit Growers Exchange maintains a staff of scientifically trained men who go through the producing districts giving helpful information about the planting, growing and packing of citrus fruits, to secure the best possible product; 11,000 of these growers with their families and employees, (in all about 100,000 persons) make their livelihood in the California citrus fruit industry in this highly scientific, cooperative manner. From their groves, averaging about 20 acres in size, 50,000 or more carloads of uniformly good, dependable oranges and lemons are shipped every year.

Their money, their industry, their reputation, their pride and their success are centered in "Sunkist."

Oranges for Health

THE recent studies in nutrition by the most able scientists prove conclusively that for the maintenance of health the diet must be not only adequate in food value—in the quantities of protein, carbohydrate and fat—but must supply the essential organic salts and acids and vitamines as well; and it is for this reason that these elements of food are being emphasized today by the world's leading dietitians.

These authorities are pointing out that while meat and potatoes and bread, the standbys in meal-planning, are necessary for active men and women and for growing boys and girls, they by no means constitute a complete dietary. They must be supplemented by an abundance of raw vegetables and fruits in order that the necessary mineral salts and vitamines may not be lacking.

Of the three known vitamines, oranges and lemons are particularly rich in vitamine C, which is essential to normal complete nutrition. Water soluble vitamine B is also present in adequate quantities. The elements furnished by these vitamines have been found to be absolutely necessary to maintain life and growth.

The organic salts and acids which are so abundant in oranges and lemons are direct aids to digestion and therefore are not only valuable in themselves but serve to promote the assimilation of all the other foods, thus making these foods more efficient than they would be without this help.

It is the consensus of opinion among specialists that incorrect eating and over-eating are the causes of most of the serious stomach and intestinal disorders so prevalent in this country today. In the diet departments of modern hospitals and sanitariums great emphasis is laid upon including an abundance of fresh fruits and vegetables in the special diets which are so important a factor in the treatment of most patients.

It is further agreed that in many cases acute stomach and intestinal disorders may be avoided entirely if the diet contains the proper amount of fresh foods. Fifty percent of the daily food may well be in the form of fresh raw fruits and vegetables. "Too many cooked foods, too few raw," is the general comment of the scientists on the eating habits of the modern family—a warning worth considering in every home by the wives and mothers who make up the daily menus.

Here Are Two Good Health Rules

  1. Eat some vegetables each day.
  2. Eat one or more oranges every day.

 

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