Browse The Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives Home Page

Barrington Hall Coffee

Barrington Hall Coffee

Barrington Hall is pure, high grade coffee, prepared by our patented process—a common-sense method of Removing the substances substances which contribute nothing to its flavor while preserving the delicious coffee flavor.

 

 

Barrington Hall is pure, high grade coffee, prepared by our patented process—a common-sense method of treating the berry whereby the substances which contribute nothing to its flavor and healthfulness are removed, and the coffee flavor is preserved to a remarkable degree.

By our process all dust and the bitter cellulose skin, evidently placed by nature around the heart of the berry to protect it. are removed and thrown away; and when you buy a pound of Barrington Hall you get a pound of the best part of the coffee berry only.

You can enjoy its delicious flavor without fear of ill effects. This is the experience of thousands who had given up coffee drinking, many of whom have written to tell us so.

"Steel-cut'' means that the coffee is cut (not ground) into fine, even particles. This cutting does not crush the little oil cells as does grinding, and the rich, aromatic oil (Food Product), which makes coffee flavor, is preserved. This explains why a pound of Barrington Hall will make 15 to 20 cups more of perfect full strength coffee than would the same coffee if ground in a coffee mill.

Price 35c to 40c per pound, according to locality. If your grocer tries to sell you something ‘‘just as good," he has his own interest, not yours, in mind. Write us and we can tell you: how and where to get Barrington Hall. If you accept an imitation, please do not judge our coffee by it

Barrington Hall Steel-Cut Coffee turning the page is a suggestion of a cup of delicious hot coffee, which is of interest to a majority of the readers. Glancing down the page, the appetite is whetted by a suggestion of impurities and the undesirable portion of product removed.

Continuing further down the page, the reader's curiosity is aroused by the uniform particles as seen through a magnifying glass, and by the words, "steel cut," wondering what difference it makes how the coffee is cut.

Upon the opposite side of the page, the reader is impressed with the neat and sanitary way in which the product is packed and is impelled by general interest to read the advertisement.

In reading the advertisement, the economic sense is aroused by reflecting that the chaff and foreign particles being removed, nothing but the good coffee would be bought.

Curiosity is gratified by the explanation of "steel cut," and the "economic sense" further aroused by the statement that the "steel cut" process enables the consumer to make 15 to 20 cups more of full-strength coffee than if ground the old way.

Continuing down the page, the reader is confronted with, "Test it in your home at our expense," which is convincing that the producer is positively certain of the merit of his product and is willing to go to some expense in order to have prospective patrons pass judgment upon it.

Considering the advertisement in its entirety, I do not think the November issue contains a greater "response getter" than this.

Wm. R. Zesinger

Return to Top of Page

Epicurean Vintage Advertising

Vintage Ads