Cottolene Shortening

Cottolene is not offered as a substitute for, or as being “just as good” as, other cooking fats. It is an original product better than anything else that you can use for shortening or frying.

Where Cottolene is Bliss

"Where Cottolene is Bliss" Cottolene Shortening Advertisement, Harper's Bazaar Magazine, 1905.

For over a quarter of a century the world has known Cottolene. It established a class of its own a generation ago. Cottolene was in the front rank of the great movement for the betterment of food products.

Cottolene is not offered as a substitute for, or as being “just as good” as, other cooking fats. It is an original product better than anything else that you can use for shortening or frying.

There is no secret about its ingredients or manufacture. Cottolene is an exact combination of the purest, richest, most carefully refined cottonseed oil-an oil far superior to most salad oils, and the equal of the best-together with the choicest beef stearine from selected, high-grade leaf beef suet. Cottolene is itself one of the purest of pure foods. The main argument for the use of Cottolene is the unexcelled purity of its ingredients and the wholesomeness of the food prepared with it.

Cottolene is always uniform in quality. It is packed in sealed pails of various sizes to suit your convenience, protecting it against contamination from dust or odor.

Moreover, you get full value when you buy Cottolene. It is 100% cooking fat. It contains no water and no salt. It is, therefore, richer in shortening properties and goes one-third farther than ordinary cooking fats.

You will like the taste of Cottolene-cooked foods. In addition to making the food better, Cottolene gives it more appeal to the eye—more relish to the appetite. Its use insures light, flaky piecrust.

It makes deliciously crisp, tender doughnuts. It creams up beautifully for cake-making. Muffins, fritters, short-cakes and all other pastry are best when made with Cottolene. It makes food light and rich, but never greasy. Cottolene heats to a high temperature without burning and cooks so quickly that the fat has no chance to soak in.

Cottolene does not absorb taste or odors. You can fry fish in Cottolene and use the remaining fat for frying potatoes or other

food. The odor of fish will not be imparted to the other food.

The purity, healthfulness, and economy of Cottolene are endorsed by leading physicians, domestic science authorities and noted culinary experts. The use of. Cottolene in your frying, shortening and cakemaking will save you money and give you better results.

"Cottolene makes good cooking better.”

Cottolene Shortening Advertisement, American Cookery Magazine, October 1912.

Cottolene Shortening Advertisement, American Cookery Magazine, October 1912.

Cottolene Shortening Advertisement, American Cookery Magazine, November 1912.

Cottolene Shortening Advertisement, American Cookery Magazine, November 1912.

Cottolene Shortening Advertisement, American Cookery Magazine, February 1913.

Cottolene Shortening Advertisement, American Cookery Magazine, February 1913.

Grand Prize - Cottolene Shortening Advertisement, What to Eat, 1907.

Grand Prize - Cottolene Shortening Advertisement, What to Eat, 1907.

Nature's Gift - Cottolene Shortening Advertisement, What to Eat, 1907.

Nature's Gift - Cottolene Shortening Advertisement, What to Eat, 1907.

Pig St or Cotton Field -- Cottolene Shortning Advertisent, What to Eat, 1907.

Pig St or Cotton Field -- Cottolene Shortning Advertisent, What to Eat, 1907.

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