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RMS Scythia Emphemera Collection

All Digitized Ephemera for the RMS Scythia available at the GG Archives. Common items of ephemera in our maritime collection include passenger lists, brochures, event and entertainment programs, and other memorabilia produced for a voyage or ship.

Saloon Passenger Manifest, Cunard Line RMS Scythia 1881

1881-07-16 RMS Scythia

  • Steamship Line: Cunard Line
  • Class of Passengers: Saloon
  • Date of Departure: 16 July 1881
  • Route: Liverpool to New York
  • Commander: Captain Murphy
Passenger Manifest, Cunard Line, 1888 Saloon Passengers, RMS Scythia

1888-08-30 RMS Scythia Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Cunard Line
  • Class of Passengers: Saloon
  • Date of Departure: 30 August 1888
  • Route: Liverpool to Boston
  • Commander: Captain Roberts
Front Cover, Cunard to Liverpool via Cobh (Queenstown) - 1920s Brochure from the Cunard Line.

Cunard to Liverpool via Cobh (Queenstown) - 1920s

Superb interior photographs of the Cunard steamships Carinthia, Franconia, Laconia, Samaria, and Scythia makes this an excellent brochure from the 1920s. The uniqueness of this booklet is greatly improved by the inclusions of context with photo captions.

Front Cover, Cunard Tourist Third Cabin Accommodations Brochure. Undated, Circa Late 1920s

Cunard Tourist Third Cabin Accommodations - 1920s

Tourist Third Cabin replaced the old Third Class on the Cunard Steamships, the refinished accommodations attracted students, professors, young business people, and bargain-hunters filling the cabins left mostly empty from the decline of the immigrant trade. This is a photo journal of the accommodations found in the new Tourist Third Cabin class. Ships Featured: Andania, Antonia, Aquitania, Ascania, Aurania, Ausonia, Berengaria, Caronia and Carmania, Laconia, Samaria, Scythia, Tuscania, and Lancastria.

Front Cover, Cunard RMS Scythia Saloon and Second Class Passenger List - 20 August 1921.

1921-08-20 RMS Scythia Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Cunard Line
  • Class of Passengers: Saloon and Second Class
  • Date of Departure: 20 August 1921
  • Route: Liverpool to New York via Queenstown (Cobh)
  • Commander: Captain W. Prothero
Front Cover, Cunard RMS Scythia Saloon and Second Class Passenger List - 17 August 1922.

1922-08-17 RMS Scythia Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Cunard Line
  • Class of Passengers: Saloon and Second Class
  • Date of Departure: 17 August 1922
  • Route: Liverpool to New York via Queenstown (Cobh)
  • Commander: Captain W. Prothero
Front Cover, RMS Scythia Concert Program in Aid of the Seamen's Charities of New York and Liverpool, Thursday, 24 August 1922.

1922-08-24 Charity Concert Program - RMS Scythia

Benefit Musical Concert onboard the RMS Scythia of the Cunard Line to aid various seamen's charities of New York and Liverpool. These concerts were conducted several times during each voyage, with separate performances for each class of passenger.

Front Cover, Second Class to Europe fromn Boston to Queenstown and Liverpool.

Cunard Line Second Class to Europe - 1927

12-Page brochure covers the Boston to Europe route of the Cunard Line in 1927. Interior photographs help to illustrate the second class accommodations available on the Samaria, Scythia, and Laconia.

Front Side of US Immigration Inspection Card, Norwegian Immigrant, Lauri A. Grava from Haugo, Voss, Norway, Contract Ticket No. 45947, Departing from Liverpool on the RMS Scythia of the Cunard Line on 27 October 1928.

Front Side of US Immigration Inspection Card, Norwegian Immigrant, Josua Grava from Haugo, Voss, Norway

1928-10-27 US Immigrant Inspection Cards - RMS Scythia

Inspection Cards used as a landing card and shown on request to a U.S. Immigration Inspector. Norwegian Immigrants Lauri A. Grava and Josua Grava from Haugo made the journey from Liverpool to Boston on board the RMS Scythia of the Cunard Line.

Front Cover, Cunard Line RMS Scythia Cabin Passenger List - 27 July 1929.

1929-07-27 RMS Scythia Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Cunard Line
  • Class of Passengers: Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 27 July 1929
  • Route: Liverpool to Boston and New York via Queenstown (Cobh)
  • Commander: Captain R. B. Irving, O.B.E., R.D., R.N.R.
Front Cover, Cunard Line RMS Scythia Tourist Third Cabin Passenger List - 19 October 1929.

1929-10-19 RMS Scythia Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Cunard Line
  • Class of Passengers: Tourist Third Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 19 October 1929
  • Route: Liverpool to Boston and New York via Queenstown (Cobh) and Galway
  • Commander: Captain R. B. Irving, O.B.E., R.D., R.N.R.
Front Cover, Cunard Line RMS Scythia Cabin Class Passenger List - 5 April 1930.

1930-04-05 RMS Scythia Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Cunard Line
  • Class of Passengers: Cabin Class
  • Date of Departure: 5 April 1930
  • Route: Liverpool to New York via Belfast, Halifax, and Boston
  • Commander: Captain R. B. Irving, O.B.E., R.D., R.N.R.
Front Cover, RMS Scythia Dinner Bill of Fare - 20 May 1930

1930-05-20 RMS Scythia Dinner Menu

Vintage Tourist Third Cabin Dinner Bill of Fare from Tuesday, 20 May 1930 on board the RMS Scythia of the Cunard Line featured Poached Sea Bass Capetienne, Roast Turkey Cranberry Sauce, and Vanilla Bavaroise for dessert. Original Owner inserted photograph of the RMS Scythia on cover of Menu.

1930-05-31 Passenger Manifest for the RMS Scythia

1930-05-31 RMS Scythia Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Cunard Line
  • Class of Passengers: Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 31 May 1930
  • Route: Liverpool to Boston and New York via Queenstown (Cobh) and Galway
  • Commander: Captain R. B. Irving
Front Cover, Cunard Line RMS Scythia Tourist Third Cabin Passenger List - 20 September 1930.

1930-09-20 RMS Scythia Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Cunard Line
  • Class of Passengers: Tourist Third Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 20 September 1930
  • Route: Liverpool to Boston and New York via Queenstown (Cobh)
  • Commander: Captain R. B. Irving, O.B.E., R.D., R.N.R.
Front Cover, Tourist Third Cabin Events Program on the Cunard RMS Scythia, for Saturday, 20 September 1930

1930-09-20 Events Program - RMS Scythia

Social Events and Sports Tournament Program for the Voyage on the RMS Scythia of the Cunard Line Beginning 20 September 1930 for Tourist Third Cabin passengers. Events included Deck Games, Horse Racing, Bridge and Whist, Movies, Concerts, Dances, and a children's party.

Front Cover, RMS Scythia Breakfast Bill of Fare 24 September 1930

1930-09-24 RMS Scythia Breakfast Menu

Vintage Tourist Third Cabin Breakfast Bill of Fare from 24 September 1930 on board the RMS Scythia of the Cunard Line featured Broiled Wiltshire, Danish and American Bacon, Bonny Boy Toasted Oats, and Buckwheat Cakes.

Front Cover, Entertainment Program in Aid of British and American Seamen's Institutions 1930-09-25

1930-09-25 Charity Entertainment Program - RMS Scythia

Variety Show style entertainment program performed for tourist class passengers on the RMS Scythia of the Cunard Line in the Tourist class to benefit British and American seamen's institutions that were also listed in the program.

Front Cover, Cunard Line RMS Scythia Cabin Class Passenger List - 10 January 1931.

1931-01-10 RMS Scythia Passenger List

  • Steamship Line:
  • Class of Passengers: Cabin Class
  • Date of Departure: 10 January 1931
  • Route: Liverpool to New York via Belfast and Halifax
  • Commander: Captain G. Gibbons, R.D., R.N.R.
Front Cover, Events Program for the Cunard RMS Scythia, Saturday, 10 January 1931.

1931-01-10 Events Program - RMS Scythia

Informative Events Program from the RMS Scythia of the Cunard Line. It covers a voyage from Liverpool to New York beginning 10 January 1931. Brief explanations of the many Deck Sports were provided to the passengers helps to make this an exceptional program from that era of ocean liner travel.

1935-09-14 Passenger Manifest for the RMS Scythia

1935-09-14 RMS Scythia Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Cunard Line
  • Class of Passengers: Tourist
  • Date of Departure: 14 September 1935
  • Route: Liverpool to Boston and New York via Cobh (Queenstown)
  • Commander: Captain G. R. Dolphin
Front Cover - RMS Scythia Farewell Dinner Bill of Fare - 21 July 1955

1955-07-21 RMS Scythia Farewell Dinner Menu

Vintage Farewell Dinner Bill of Fare from 21 July 1955 on board the RMS Scythia of the Cunard Line featured Contre Filet of Beef, Demi-Glace, Poached Turbot, Hollandaise, and Gateau Au Revoir for dessert.

 

Ephemera contained in the GG Archives collection represent the souvenirs provided to the passengers of each voyage. Many of these souvenir ephemeral items have disappeared over the years.

Our selection varies considerably by ship, and likely contains only a sampling of what was originally produced and printed by the steamship lines.

Bookmark pages you're researching and check back periodically for additions as we continue to digitize our extensive ephemera materials.

The Last Word in Cunarders

The New Cunarder RMS Scythia.

The New Cunarder RMS Scythia. GGA Image ID # 141c0dd806

This ship is the first of a new class of passenger liners which will presently be a not uncommon sight upon our seas

The Scythia, now sailing on her maiden voyage, has been designated “The Ship of the Future”

Making her maiden trip across the Atlantic at moderate speed in order to get her machinery into easy working order, the new Canard liner “Scythia,” the last word in shipbuilding, is nearing the port of New York, having sailed from Liverpool on August 20. She is scheduled to leave New York Tuesday, September 6, on her return trip to Liverpool.

The “Scythia” was built at the famous yard of Vickers, Ltd., Barrow, and is as graceful and staunch as her many famous elder sisters. She has been described as the “Ship of the future,” a model for all ships to pattern after, for there is small chance of improving upon her seeming perfection and is one of the first passenger vessels to have been designed and built to burn oil fuel, the many advantages of which have been emphasized by the actual performances of the “Aquitania.”

She is the first great liner to possess propelling machinery of the double-reduction geared turbine type. The auxiliary machinery of the “Scythia” and the steering gear, too, provide a further departure from any previous practice.

These new features effect each, a definite improvement in the comfort or convenience of the passenger, or in the extensiveness of the accommodation, and place the “Scythia” In the very forefront of the great passenger vessels of the world.

Not only does the “Scythia” lead the way in constructional and engineering improvements, but her passenger accommodation la such that she can lay claim to being one of the most up-to-date liners afloat.

The First Class Dining Hall is Delightful because it is Roomy, Light, and Most Tastefully Decorated.

The First Class Dining Hall is Delightful because it is Roomy, Light, and Most Tastefully Decorated. GGA Image ID # 141c20d183

The variety and spaciousness ot public rooms and staterooms depend very largely upon the size of the ship, and In this respect the “Scythia” with her 21,000 gross tonnage, 600 feet length, 73 1/2 feet beam and 46 feet depth has space sufficient to provide unusually extensive accommodation for some 2,2000 passengers.

Not only the 350 saloon and the 350 second class passengers will find that the “floating hotel” comparison has been maintained and developed, but third class passengers, especially, will appreciate the careful and complete provision that has been made for their needs.

New features are continually being introduced into the modern liner which all tend to increase the comfort of the passenger. One of these is the garden lounge. In the "Scythia's” saloon passenger accommodation there are two garden lounges, one situated on the port and the other on the starboard side of the “A” or upper promenade deck.

Here passengers may enjoy the sun and the sea air amidst surroundings typical of an old English garden, fitted with many comfortable rest-inviting wicker chairs. Cold winds and rain do not interfere with the comfort of those who seek the tranquility of these garden lounges, for they are enclosed on the outside of the vessel with sliding windows.

Then there is the verandah café for the sole use of the second class passengers. The “Scythia” is the first Cunarder of her size to have such an attraction for second class patrons.

Another feature worthy of note in the “Scythia’s” accommodation is the small subsidiary rooms or alcoves which form part of the big public rooms and yet maintain •a certain sense of privacy. In addition, the ventilation of the public rooms and staterooms has been thoroughly studied and the latest improvements introduced.

The main staircase forms itself into an imposing central hall with approaches to the saloon, drawing and writing- room, lounge and smoking room. This grouping of the public rooms should prove of great convenience to passengers.

The lounge is particularly attractive. In plan it is oval with an imposing central dome of white glass. The exquisite ornamentation 1b reminiscent of the Empiré period, being delicately molded in plaster.

There are four alcoves, diagonally opposite each other, and these have separate windows. The massive fireplace with its handsome marble mantelpiece is surmounted by a picture in the style of the period. At each side of the fireplace and at the opposite end are carved mahogany console tables.

The furniture and appointments of the room present a most effective color scheme—black and sold, grey and gold, with here and there touches of Vermillion.

The rich effect is toned down by a number of pieces of furniture in old mahogany. The coverings are in black end gold, and blue and gold with charming Chinese designs, while grey velvet is also introduced into the scheme.

Chinese silk of blue and gold is the material used for the curtains, while Reseda green pile carpet completes the successful effort to provide a general representation of the best work produced during the latter end of the 18th century.

The drawing and writing-room Is extended at each extremity by an alcove. The main feature of this room iB the elliptical dome over the center portion, finishing with a fan-shaped painted panel on either side. Rising to the full height of the cornice the fireplace has massive pilasters on either side of its old-fashioned grate.

The color scheme of the walls and ceiling is white, while the appointments are in the modern style but showing the influence of the Georgian period. The Adam furniture is of dull old mahogany and the silk coverings form a unique color scheme of purple and yellow.

This, with the purple carpet and the exquisitely designed damask curtains strike a modern note among the reproductions of Adam models. There is a handsome carved mahogany book case, situated on the opposite side to the fireplace.

In that part of the ship devoted to second class passengers, the comfort of the traveler has received the fullest consideration. Public rooms include a dining saloon, lounge and smoking room. In the dining saloon, small tables for four and six people replace the usual long tables, while the stately sideboard has given way to a number of small quick-service tables.

These developments cannot fall to add to the pleasures of the voyage. The drawing room is furnished in plain mahogany. The cane backed chairs and settees are covered in moquette and corded velvet, and the carpet is in keeping with the general scheme of decoration.

The smoking room is paneled throughout in oak, and is furnished also in oak with moquette coverings of modern design. Jaspe Rubino in octagonal tile pattern covers the floor. The second class verandah café overlooks the stern of the vessel, thus giving the passengers an uninterrupted and sheltered view of the sea.

Never on any ship before has greater care been devoted to the design of the accommodation for third class passengers. The old-fashioned open berths have been entirely dispensed with, and throughout the ship third class passengers are berthed in commodious rooms each accommodating, in general, two to four persons.

Spacious alleyways separate the group of rooms, and congestion is completely eliminated. Two large dining saloons, a general room and smoking rooms, all commodious, well lighted and well ventilated, and ample open and covered promenade space, complete a scheme that is unexcelled in any ship.

What is true of the third class accommodation is true also of that provided for the crew. Passengers in their luxurious rooms will find satisfaction in knowing that those responsible for carrying them across the sea are housed In greater comfort than ever before.

"The Last Word in Cunarders," in Shipping, Marine Transportation, Construction, Equipment, and Supplies, Vol. XIV, No. 4, New York: Shipping Publishing Company, Inc., 25 August 1921, P. 8-9.

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