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SS Leviathan Ephemera Collection

All Digitized Ephemera for the SS Leviathan available at the GG Archives. Common items of ephemera in our maritime collection include passenger lists, brochures, event and entertainment programs, and other memorabilia produced for a voyage or ship.

Front Cover of 1923 Brochure Introducing the Flagship of the United States Lines, the Incomparable Steamship Leviathan.

1923 - United States Lines The Steamship Leviathan

This 1923 Brochure captures the grand elegance and beauty of the World's Largest Steamship - the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines. The large photographs will allow you to envision the incredible luxury found on this very popular ocean liner.

Front Cover of a 1924 Brochure from the United States Lines Entitled "The American Way to Europe.

1924 - United States Lines - The American Way to Europe

Comprehensive brochure from the United States Lines developed to provide information and photographs that describe the ships and amenities geared to Americans traveling to Europe. Also contains brief information on sites to see in European countries along with passport information. Featured Ships: America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic.

1924-08-05 Passenger Manifest for the SS Leviathan

1924-08-05 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: First and Second Class
  • Date of Departure: 5 August 1924
  • Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R.F
1925-07-25 Passenger Manifest for the SS Leviathan

1925-07-25 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: Tourist Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 25 July 1925
  • Route: New York to Southampton via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R.F
1925-08-25 Passenger Manifest for the SS Leviathan

1925-08-25 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: First Class and Tourist Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 25 August 1925
  • Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R.F.
Passenger Manifest, United States Lines SS Leviathan 1926

1926-08-10 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 10 August 1926
  • Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain Herbert Hartley, USNR
1926-09-21 Passenger Manifest for the SS Leviathan

1926-09-21 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: First and Second Class
  • Date of Departure: 21 September 1926
  • Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R
1927-04-19 Passenger Manifest for the SS Leviathan

1927-04-19 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: First and Second Class
  • Date of Departure: 19 April 1927
  • Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Commodore Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R
1927-06-21 Passenger Manifest for the SS Leviathan

1927-06-21 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: First and Second Class
  • Date of Departure: 21 June 1927
  • Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Commodore Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R
1927-10-11 Passenger Manifest for the SS Leviathan

1927-10-11 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: American Legion Passengers (Second A.E.F.)
  • Date of Departure: 11 October 1927
  • Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Commodore Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R
  • Note: Order a PDF of this Passenger List containing 1,364 Passengers
1928-03-13 Passenger Manifest for the SS Leviathan

1928-03-13 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: First and Second Class
  • Date of Departure: 13 March 1928
  • Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain H. A. Cunningham
Front Cover, SS Leviathan Farewell Dinner Bill of Fare - 10 May 1928

1928-05-10 SS Leviathan Farewell Dinner Menu

Vintage Farewell Dinner Bill of Fare from 10 May 1928 on board the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines featured Reindeer Steak, Poivrade, Plovers à la Souvaroff, and Soufflé Confiture for dessert.

Dinner Menu, United States Lines SS Leviathan, Private Party - 1928

1928-06-10 SS Leviathan Private Dinner Party Menu

Elaborate Private Party Dinner Menu on board the Flagship of the United States Lines, the SS Leviathan. This Sunday Dinner hosted by Mr. S. B. Applebaum featured Filet of Sole and Roast Vermont Turkey with Crème Dame Blanche. This four-page menu was bound by an elegant Red, White and Blue striped and tasseled string.

Front Cover, Second Class Concert Program Given on Board the Flagship "Leviathan" on Thursday, 21 June 1928.

1928-06-21 Concert Program - SS Leviathan

Elegant Concert program and variety show for second class passengers on board the United States Lines Flagship -- the SS Leviathan. This production from Thursday, 21 June 1928 featured classical and popular music numbers, vocalists, readings, and a scene from a comedy playlet.

1929-03-30 SS Leviathan

1929-03-30 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 30 March 1929
  • Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Commodore H. A. Cunningham
1929-08-27 Passenger Manifest for the SS Leviathan

1929-08-27 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: Tourist Third Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 27 August 1929
  • Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Commodore H. A. Cunningham
Passenger Manifest, SS Leviathan, United States Lines, September 1932

1932-09-09 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: Tourist Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 9 September 1932
  • Route: Bremen to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg
  • Commander: Commodore Albert B. Randall, U.S.N.R
Steamship Ticket - Tourist Cabin - United States Lines SS Leviathan, 1932

1932-09-10 Tourist Cabin Contract - SS Leviathan

Steamship Ticket - United States Lines, Tourist Cabin Contract Ticket, Dutch Woman, Rotterdam (Cherbourg) to New York aboard the SS Leviathan.

Passenger Manifest, SS Leviathan, United States Lines, November 1932, Bremen to New York

1932-11-25 SS Leviathan Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: United States Lines
  • Class of Passengers: First Class and Tourist Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 25 November 1932
  • Route: Bremen to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain Commodore Albert B. Randall, U.S.N.R

 

Ephemera contained in the GG Archives collection represent the souvenirs provided to the passengers of each voyage. Many of these souvenir ephemeral items have disappeared over the years.

Our selection varies considerably by ship, and likely contains only a sampling of what was originally produced and printed by the steamship lines.

Bookmark pages you're researching and check back periodically for additions as we continue to digitize our extensive ephemera materials.

Leviathan Sails on Maiden Voyage with Full Cabins

Speed Records and Luxurious Fittings Attract Business and Great Liner Carries Largest Number of Steerage Passengers Taken from New York This Year

The Flagship of the United States Lines, SS Leviathan, Docked at Pier 86, North River.

The Flagship of the United States Lines, SS Leviathan, Docked at Pier 86, North River. GGA Image ID # 14150c2c99

WITH everything spick and span W after her trial trip and with such minor alterations as were considered necessary all made and out of the way, the great Leviathan steamed away from her pier at 46th Street on July 4th with every cabin occupied and with the largest number of steerage passengers taken from this port during the year.

Preceded by a replica of the Clermont and accompanied by a squadron of naval seaplanes overhead, the great liner nosed her way slowly down the Hudson to the open sea amid cheers and good wishes from a great throng that lined the pier heads and blackened the sea wall at the Battery.

It was a fine and impressive sight and folks forgot the drizzle of summer rain in their enthusiasm for this great representative vessel of the American Merchant Marine.

The demand for space on the Leviathan has been unprecedented and many people planning trips abroad who were unable to obtain accommodations on the maiden voyage have decided to await the next sailing of the ship, which is scheduled for July 28.

Winter Garden and the Ritz Carlton Restaurant on the SS Leviathan.

Winter Garden and the Ritz Carlton Restaurant on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 14151b1578

The astonishment of Aladdin when he entered the wonderful cave of the Genii was experienced afresh last Wednesday, when the Leviathan's passengers streamed up the gang planks.

From stem to stern, the great ship showed what American ingenuity can accomplish; not only in the way of shipbuilding and reconditioning, but in artistic arrangement and in the creation of that intangible quality which we Yankees call “class.”

Thousands of feet of holystoned deck space where there is room for more than twelve people to walk abreast was the first thing to strike the eye, and immediately impressed one with the idea of spaciousness.

Then there was the broad navigating bridge, equipped with every conceivable appliance and with last minute wrinkles too numerous to mention. The huge Sperry searchlight, operated from the bridge, stood out free and clear on the foremast.

The SS Leviathan Carries Non-Capsizable Motor Lifeboats Equiped with Wireless.

The SS Leviathan Carries Non-Capsizable Motor Lifeboats Equiped with Wireless. GGA Image ID # 141538dbc0

Between decks were the great social halls, Ritz restaurant, magnificent lounges, and deluxe staterooms; winding stairways like those found only in vast public buildings; scrolled glass doors opening into snug elevators, which take one quickly from deck to deck.

Winding passages and broad vistas: rooms decorated in various periods with rich hangings and tastefully arranged carving; soft rugs into which one's feet sink noiselessly; the winter garden; the flower house; the great swimming pool. But one could go on endlessly describing this Pandora's Box of marvels which is the American-flag ship—Leviathan.

These are the showy things; but down below are the great engines which have given such a good account of themselves. To describe these engines would require volumes, but suffice it to say that they stack up admirably against the best of their kind in the world and, judging by the fine records made on the recent trial trip, it would seem that they are a shade to the good.

When the Leviathan sailed away last Wednesday, she carried a distinguished passenger list. Representatives of the United States Lines, operators of the great liner, stated that the cabin list included 800 first cabin, 450 second and 450 third.

Among the passengers making the first trip was Albert D. Lasker, under whose administration as chairman of the United States Shipping Board the big vessel was reconditioned.

Captain Herbert Hartley, Commander of the SS Leviathan.

Captain Herbert Hartley, Commander of the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 141599f4f7

As a special honor to Mr. Lasker he has been assigned the Presidential suite, the luxurious quarters originally intended by her German builders to accommodate Germany's deposed emperor, William Hohenzollern.

Other well-known persons booked for the maiden voyage included Vincent Astor, Mrs. J. Borden Harriman and Col. George Harvey, United States Ambassador to the Court of St. James, who postponed his departure in order to sail on the liner.

H. C. Eackel, vice-president Underwood Typewriter Company, and Mrs. Eackel; Howard Chandler Christy, artist: Oran McCormick, publisher: E. J. Laidlaw, banker, Mrs. Laidlaw and party; Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Elizalde, Minister from Ecuador; Louis Wiley and valet, business manager of the New York Times; Congressman Madden; Senator and Mrs. Nicholas Longworth; Gen. Butler Ames: Mr. and Mrs. G. Logan Payne and daughter; Dr. Sawyer, the President's physician, and Mrs. Sawyer; Frederick Cody and party; Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Lorimer; Judge and Mrs. I. Wasservogel; W. Booth, vice-president Guarantee Trust Company, and Mrs. Booth; Charles H. Moss, vice-president Fairbanks Scale Company, Mrs. Moss and party; J. E. Rothwell, president Boston Chamber of Commerce; George Washington Grant and family: Captain Charles Warton, United States Army; Hiram Abrams, president United Artists Corporation, and Mrs. Abrams; Senator and Mrs. Smoot: Juan F. De Cardenas, Spanish Embassy, and Mrs. De Cardenas; Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Speyer and family; Judge Robert Lovett, Anna Fitzu, Francisca Peralta, Metropolitan opera star; General Coleman Du Pont, J. M. Thomson, owner of the New Orleans Item, and Mrs. Thomson; Dr. Edward J. Vaughan, of Chicago; Congressman George N. Seger and Mrs. Seger.

Also among those on board in the second cabin are J. W. Slack, of Silver Creek, N.Y., who was one of the million-dollar bidders for the fleet of the United States Shipping Board, and Mrs. Slack.

It was also announced that all of the cargo space on the big ship had been taken by Wilson & Co., Chicago packers, and a consignment of foodstuffs had been rushed here from Chicago on fast trains, According to George A. Blair, general traffic manager for Wilson & Co., the firm was so impressed by the record time made on the trial trip of the ship that the entire cargo space was immediately booked.

But this account would not be complete without reference to the executive personnel of the Leviathan—the officers who will be responsible for the great property placed in their charge and who will have so much to do with the future success of this huge unit in the American Merchant Marine. An official list of these officers follows:

SENIOR PERSONNEL, DECK DEPARTMENT

Herbert Hartley, Captain; H. C. Fish: Staff Commander; K. B. Lowry, Chief Officer; J. P. Linder, First Officer: E. W. Higgins, Second Officer; H. Manning; Second Officer: G. F. Danforth, Third Officer; J. S. Bowen. Third Officer; L. M. Sanders, Third Officer; W. E. Burns, Fourth Officer: J. F. Wilson, Cadet Officer: E. N. Pickerill, Chief Radio Officer; J. R. Irwin, 1st Assistant Radio Officer: E. Buckley, Chief Boatswain: J Buchanan, Chief Carpenter; C. A. White, Deck Yeoman; M. H. Hunt, Purser; J. G. Tedd, Second Purser; H. Beckett, Assistant Purser: P. V. Corey, Doctor; T. F. Hanlon, Assistant Doctor.

SENIOR PERSONNEL ENGINE DEPARTMENT

R. L. Harrison, Chief Engineer; J. J. Fagen, Staff Engineer: R. Douglas, Staff Engineer: W. J. Lundy, Staff Engineer; B. L. Cartmel, 1st Assistant Engineer; C. H. Isgar, 1st Assistant Engineer; D. H. Betts, 1st Assistant Engineer; M. P. lverson, 2d Assistant Engineer; J. M. Cowell, 2d Assistant Engineer: E. L. Dawson, 2d Assistant Engineer: E. J. Deeds, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer; J. M. Senlle, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer; G. L. Clow, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer; G. H. Begley, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer; L. L. Szatkowski, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer; C. C. Merry, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer; A. R. Brebner, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer; W. N. O'Connor, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer; A. H. Claudius, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer: M. T. Minnihan, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer: W. J. Brockie, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer: A. Schlexer, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer: F. H. Kipper, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer; T. Webster, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer A. M. Davis, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer; H. J. Williamson, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer: C. Hunt. Senior 3d Assistant Engineer; J. W. Thomas Jun' 3d Assistant Engineer: W. R. Fernald. Junior 3d Assistant Engineer: W. J. Smith, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer; E. Dowell, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer; J. F. Halle, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer; C. C. Clark, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer; W. G.  Hawkins, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer: C. H. S. Hallett, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer; T. B. Milroy, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer; J. T. Olson, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer; J.A. Smith, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer; W. B. Schaum, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer: J. E. Bacorn, Junior 3d Assistant Engimeer: J. A. Hanna, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer: F. J. Schoff, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer; H. G. Thompson, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer; L. I. Sawyer, 4th Assistant Engineer: G. C. Tucker, 4th Assistant Engineer: W. E. Wallace, Hydraulic Engineer; G. W. Bailes, Chief Refrigerating Engineer: R. J. Cross. Chief Electrician; A. G. McCarthy, Chief plumber: S. Crawford, Senior. Boilermaker; Chas. H. Mathias, Leading Machinist; D. E. Trower, Engineer Writer: Wm. R. Broughton, Engineer Writer.

STEWARD'S DEPARTMENT

W. J. Gibson, Chief Steward: J. Nicholas Assistant Chief Steward; T. Swindles, Second Steward; Wm. Pearse: Chef-De-Cuisine.

"Leviathan Sails on Maiden Voyage with Full Cabins," in The Marine Journal: America's Leading Marine Weekly, New York, Saturday, Vol. 47, No. 1, 7 July 1923, p. 14-15+.

Leviathan Meets Every Expectation on Maiden Voyage

Trip to Cherbourg Is Made in Five Days, Eighteen Hours---American Merchant Marine Seeks Friendly Trade Rivalry, Not Speed Records, Says Lasker

THE United States Lines passenger liner Leviathan, queen of the American overseas fleet and pride of the American Merchant Marine, arrived at Southampton last Tuesday, having completed her first trip across the Atlantic as an American passenger vessel in five days, eighteen hours.

The entire voyage was without incident and everything functioned as though the ship had been in service for a year, instead of less than one week. The opinion of both passengers and crew was that the vessel had made an excellent showing and that there was but small room for minor improvements.

The Leviathan maintained an average speed of 23.65 knots, covering on the record day 565 knots. There were no breakdowns and the machinery functioned perfectly.

No repairs will be needed on the other side, and all that will be needed is the water, fuel and oil supplies. Had it not been for fog in the Channel. it is more than likely that the time made by the Leviathan would have been shaved by an hour or so, for it was after 8 P.M. that the pilot boat caught its first glimpse of the vessel.

Some liquor was carried by individual passengers on the trip, but the ship was in every sense of the word “dry” so far as the majority of the passengers and the crew were concerned.

Albert Lasker, former chairman of the U. S. Shipping Board, who made the trip across as a special commissioner, was subjected to a running fire of questions as soon as the vessel docked.

In outlining the policy of the Board for keeping the American flag on the seas, Mr. Lasker said in part:

“We are not challenging anybody. We believe the Atlantic is big enough for both England and the United States. We have learned a lot from the British.

“On this trip we did not try to beat the Mauretania's record——but on some trip when we have a following gale we may try. We sought primarily to make the Leviathan a paying proposition and have given a lot of attention to the problem of fuel economy. We found that each day we got better results from the engines.”

Throughout, Mr. Lasker emphasized that the Leviathan is purely a commercial proposition and that any except ordinary trade rivalry with Britain is not intended.

“The American merchant marine will never die," he declared.

Senator Smoot and Representative Madden went further, however, saying: “We intend to have a merchant marine whether it pays or not."

Passengers appeared well pleased with the efficiency of the crew and provisions made for their comfort. It was stated that after the first day service was smooth and quick, and some of the ship's officers said there had not been one case of seasickness during the crossing, which, however, was not rough.

Three records in radio communication were established by the Leviathan, according to an announcement made by the Western Electric Company.

“The ship not only broke all previous war-time communication marks by transmitting 15,000 words a day to and from the shore. but managed to keep in constant touch with land radio stations 1,000 to 1,300 miles away,” says the announcement. “

By means of new apparatus especially designed for it, the Leviathan operated simultaneously and for long periods two different sending and receiving sets.

“The newly developed transmitter installed on the Leviathan is designed to send messages on four different wave lengths. A rotary wave-changing switch, operated by means of an automobile steering wheel, permits almost instantaneous change to any one of four wave lengths-—18,000, 2,100, 2,400 or 2,500 meters—on the Leviathan’s antennae.

“Three of these wave lengths were used on the trial trip—1,800, 2,100 and 2,500 meters; the highest and the lowest were used for transmitting messages and the intermediate one for calling stations."

"Leviathan Meets Every Expectation on Maiden Voyage," in The Marine Journal: America's Leading Marine Weekly, New York, Saturday, Vol. 47, No. 2, 14 July 1923, p.14.

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