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January 1978 Proceedings Magazine: United States Naval Institute

January 1978 Proceedings Magazine: United States Naval Institute

United States Naval Institute
January 1978
Volume 104/1/899 Proceedings
Articles
The Breakdown in Naval Shipbuilding 24
Those who rail out against the military-industrial complex must have something besides naval shipbuilding in mind. The players in this unhappy game are hardly on the same team.
By John R. Newell
A New Kind of Navy 32
Remember when the battleship was being called the Navy's dinosaur by the carrier people? Now the shoe is on the other foot, and it's beginning to pinch.
By Commander Timothy J. Keen, USN (Ret.)
Building a Navy in a Hurry 41
The transfer of petro-dollars around the globe has brought about changes in the ability of various countries to arm themselves.
Among the fastest moving is Iran, the possessor of a new navy.
By Lieutenant Commander Thomas F. Green, USN
Weapon Effects Primer 50
Too frequently, those who go to sea in the Navy's warships are unaware of what would happen if their vessels were hit by any of today's weapons. And what they don't know can really hurt them.
By Lieutenant Commander Charles R. Jones, USN
The German High Seas Fleet: A Reappraisal 56
Sometimes it takes an Army man to provide an appreciation of the value of naval power. A West Point cadet examines the importance of Germany's fleet during World War I.
By Cadet Jeffrey A. Romer, USMA
Pictorial—USS Tarawa (LHA-1) 62
What is like King Arthur's court, an island, an airport, and a department store? The USS Tarawa, of course. She's all those things and a lot more.
Photographs by William M. Powers; text by Major Anthony D. Nastri, USMC
Cover Departments 19 The opinions or assertions in the articles are the personal ones of the authors and are not to be construed as official. They do not necessarily reflect the views of either the Navy Department or the U.S. Naval Institute.
The USS Tarawa (LHA- I), lead ship in the most sophisticated class of amphibious warfare ships ever built, is featured in a pictorial beginning on page 62. Cover photo provided Secretary's Notes 74
through the courtesy of Ingalls Ship- Old Navy 76
building Division of Litton Industries. Leadership Forum Comment and Discussion Nobody asked me, but . . Book Reviews 21&81
Notable Naval Books . 90 95 101 107 117 125
Professional Notes Tomorrow's Fleet Notebook
Proceedings is published monthly by
U. S. Naval Institute, Annapolis, Md. 21402. Second-class postage paid at Annapolis, Md. and at additional mailing offices. Memberships/Subscriptions $15.00 one year U.S.A. Copyright © 1978 U. S. Naval Institute.

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