Browse The Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives Home Page

April 1946 (Part I) Proceedings Magazine: United States Naval Institute

UNITED STATES NAVAL INSTITUTE PROCEEDINGS
Vol. 72 APRIL, 1946 No. 518, Part I

Contents from Front Cover

April 1946 (Part I) Proceedings Magazine: United States Naval Institute

  • Notes on Our Naval Future (Prize Essay, 1946)—Smith
  • The Administration of the Former Japanese Mandated Islands—Clark
  • The Rehabilitation Needs of the Returning Veteran—Benton
  • The CVL's Success Story—Halsey
  • Experiment in Mutual Understanding—Billingsley
  • The Sea Campaign from Australia to the Philippines—Eyre
  • Shall We Harken unto Fables?—Sharp, Palmer, and McKnight
  • Rebuilding Guam's War-Torn Water System—Lawrence
  • The Coast Guard in the Army—Spencer
  • Discussions, Comments, Notes
  • Book Reviews
  • Notes on International Affairs
  • Professional Notes
  • Secretary's Notes
  • Minesweeping—Van Nostrand

1946-04 Part One Naval Institute Proceedings

April 1946 Whole No. 518—Part I, Vol 72, No. 4

  • NOTES ON OUR NAVAL FUTURE (Prize Essay, 1946) 489
    By Commander Russell H. Smith, U. S. Navy
    Now that a peace is upon us for which we are as yet unprepared, the momentous problem of the disposition of our armed forces and thier future status looms as one of the most important considerations of post-war planning.
  • MINESWEEPING 505
    By Lieutenant (j.g.) A. D. Van Nostrand, U. S. Naval Reserve
    Our mine warfare against Japan was a principal facotr in the war of attrition against the home islands and in the early end of the war, but unlike the air and undersea compaigns, the menace of mines still exists to endanger shipping of all nations.
  • THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE FORMER JAPANESE MANDATED ISLANDS 511
    By Lieutenant Commander T. 0. Clark, U. S. Naval Reserve
    The price of the former Japanese mandated islands has been too high, and their value too great to ever relinquish. The United States Navy is the proper agency to colonize and administer these islands, utilizing almost entirely components already a part of the naval establishment.
  • THE REHABILITATION NEEDS OF THE RETURNING VETERAN 517
    By Dr. Arthur L. Benton
    Upon returning home from military service, many veterans will be in dire need of "psychiatric rehabilitation."
  • THE CVL's SUCCESS STORY 523
    By Lieutenant Commander Ashley Halsey, Jr., U. S. Naval Reserve
    The success of converting Light cruisers into aircraft carriers.
  • EXPERIMENT IN MUTUAL UNDERSTANDING 533
    By Lieutenant Commander H. E. Billingsley, U. S. Naval Reserve
    Ultimately and basically chain of command begins with that body who collectively rules, individually is ruled -- the people. Everyone is a subordinate in an American Army or a navy. Even the Commander in Chief at the pinnacle of the organization takes his orders.
  • THE SEA CAMPAIGN FROM AUSTRALIA TO THE PHILIPPINES 539
    By James K. Eyre, Jr.
    Admiral Nimitz and General MacArthur, as America's commanders in chief of the two Pacific theaters, subsequently conferred in Australia, where they worked out detailed strategy for the counterinvasion of the Philippines and the ultimate defeat of Japan.
  • SHALL WE HARKEN UNTO FABLES? 553
    By Vice Admiral Alexander Sharp, U. S. Navy, Lieutenant James E
    Palmer, Jr., U. S. Coast Guard Reserve, and Lieutenant Robert S. McKnight, Jr., U. S. Naval Reserve
    A false sense of military security may jeopardize the future well-being of the United States. It is the duty of every American citizen to keep this in mind and to take appropriate action when and if it is necessary.
  • REBUILDING GUAM'S WAR-TORN WATER SYSTEM 561
    By Lieutenant W. A. Lawrence (C.E.C.), U. S. Naval Reserve
    By utilizing battle-damaged reservoirs and water lines and by salvaging additional materials, Naval Construction Battalians on Guam rebuilt in record time a large municipal type water system.
  • THE COAST GUARD IN THE ARMY 569
    By Lieutenant (j.g.) E. R. Spencer, Jr., U. S. Coast Guard Reserve
  • DISCUSSIONS, COMMENTS, NOTES 573
  • BOOK REVIEWS 577
    • Arms and Policy, 1939-1944 by Hoffman Nickerson
    • Lower Deck by Lt. John Davies, R.N.V.R.
    • War Years With Jeb Stuart by William W. Blackford
    • Ships of the Fleet by Elizabeth Mallett Conger
    • Destroyers In Action by Richard A. Shafter
    • Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, Revised and Edited by Julius Grant, Third Edition.
  • NOTES ON INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 583
  • PROFESSIONAL NOTES 591
  • SECRETARY'S NOTES 625

The opinions or assertions in the articles are the private ones of the writers, and are not to be
construed as official or reflecting the views of the Navy Department or the naval service at large.
Published monthly at 450 Ahnaip St., Menasha, Wis.
Executive, Editorial, and Business Offices, U. S. Naval Institute, Annapolis, Md.
Advertising Department, Suite 710, 2000 Connecticut Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C.
Entered as second-class matter at the post-office at Menasha, Wis., April 4, 1922, and at the post-office
at Annapolis, Md. under Act of August 4, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of
postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1919, authorized March 13, 1922. Membership dues (including PROCEEDINGS), $2.00 a year.
Subscription rate, $4.00 a year. (Foreign postage, $1.00 extra.) Single copies 50 cents,
III

Return to Top of Page