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November 1976 Proceedings Magazine: United States Naval Institute

November 1976 Proceedings Magazine: United States Naval Institute

United States Naval Institute
NOVEMBER 1976
Proceedings
Volume 102 / 11 / 885
Articles

Foreign Policy and the Marine Corps
The Marine Corps has always been the ready right arm of U. S. foreign policy -and, with increased dependence on sea power for security and survival, the use of the Corps is likely to increase.
By Major W. Hays Parks, USMC
The Surface Forces
The 1974 consolidation of cruisers, destroyers, amphibious ships, service forces and the mine force into two "Naval Surface Forces" seemed like a good idea. How is it working out?
By Vice Admiral Robert S. Salzer, USN (Ret.)
Is Military Unionism An Idea Whose Time Has Come? Everybody who is anybody—e.g., the Secretary of Defense, the Chief of Naval Operations—is opposed to military unionism. But a lot of career enlisted think the idea has some merit.
By Lieutenant John E. Kane, Lieutenant Gregory C. Reynolds, Lieutenant Arne R. Thorgerson, and Lieutenant Commander Jeff Gordon, USN
People—The Navy's Most Critical Resource
The Defense Manpower Commission was created by an uneasy Congress in 1974 to tell the lawmakers what they are getting for the extremely high cost of today's military personnel.
By Curtis W. Tarr and Captain Paul C. Keenan, Jr., USN (Ret.)
A Holocaust for Happy Valley?
Perhaps it ought to be called Unhappy Valley, peopled as it is by. U. S. pacifists who fail to perceive their mortal danger from Soviet leadership that is itself imperilled because of its own failures.
By Henry Young
German Remotely Piloted Bombs
World War II was four years old when, in 1943, Germany introduced a new robot bomb by attacking and sinking, ironically, a battleship of its former ally, Italy.
By Charier H. Bogart
18
26
36
45
52
62
Cover
Lieutenant Commander F. Richard Whalen's vivid painting of the Harold E. Holt towing the Mayaguez depicts the epilogue of a drama in which the U. S. Marines—whose experience with international piracy began on the shores of Tripoli—played a new role in thwarting terror diplomacy. See page 93.
Departments
The Old Navy 69
Comment and Discussion 73 Nobody asked me, but . . . 84 Book Reviews 85 Books of Interest to the
Professional 90
"Mayday" for the Mayaguez 93
Weapon Systems 112
Notebook 113
The opinions or assertions in the articles are the personal ones of the authors and are not to be construed as official. They do not necessarily reflect the views of either the Navy Department or the U. S. Naval Institute.

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