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May 1945 Proceedings Magazine: United States Naval Institute

UNITED STATES NAVAL INSTITUTE PROCEEDINGS
Vol. 71 MAY, 1945 No. 507

Contents from Front Cover

May 1945 Issue of United States Naval Institute Proceedings

  • The Obligation of Freedom.—Nelson (Honorable Mention, 1945)
  • Bring 'Em Back Alive—Navy Style.
  • Life–Raft Navigator.—Solan
  • Building a Seven Seas Navy.—Mitchell
  • Desertion in Time of War.—Martin
  • Manila (ABACA) Fiber for World War II.—Pearson and Holden The U. S. Navy and the First Japanese Mission to the United States.— Sachse
  • The Tide in Philippine Waters.—Marmer
  • High Spot of the Pacific.—Ford
  • And Keep Our Powder Dry.—Cummings
  • Book Reviews
  • Notes on International Affairs
  • Professional Notes
  • Secretary's Notes
  • Combat Operations, March 1944 to March 1945.—King

May 1945 Contents

  • THE OBLIGATION OF FREEDOM (HONORABLE MENTION, 1945) 487
    By Captain Frederick J. Nelson, U. S. Navy
    Military service is a personal obligation -- the obligation of Freedom.
  • BRING 'EM BACK ALIVE—NAVY STYLE 499
    By John Brook Penfold
    Every man in the Navy, from the seamen on up the line, fight and live with a vigor that is lacking in our enemies because they know that no matter what happens, everything possible will be done to rescue them from their sinking ship, isolated and surrounded foxhole, crashed plane, or when they are marooned on a Japanese-held island.
  • LIFE-RAFT NAVIGATOR 505
    By Lieutenant Joseph E. Solan, U. S. Naval Reserve
    The Solan "Life-Raft Navigator" provides in convenient form, all the astronomical data and formulas necessary to determine latitude and longitude with only a watch set to Greenwich civil time.
  • BUILDING A SEVEN SEAS NAVY 507
    By Donald W. Mitchell, PhD
    The Navy has risen to the challenge of war by achieving one of the greatest construction tasks of all history.
  • DESERTION IN TIME OF WAR 515
    By Lieutenant Commander W. P. Martin, U. S. Naval Reserve
    Men convicted of Desertion in Time of War are sentenced to be reduced to the lowest rating of their branch of the service, to be confined for a period of years, with accessories, consisting of hard labor and loss of pay, and then to be discharged from the service.
  • MANILA (ABACA) FIBER FOR WORLD WAR II 525
    By Lieutenant Commander K. G. Pearson, U. S. Naval Reserve, and Lieutenant A. L. Holden, U. S. Naval Reserve
    The Navy has regarded Manila as the best cordage fiber (hemp). and long before World War II, Initiated prior provision for a reserve supply in this country on which it could draw in the event of being cut off by war from the Philippines.
  • THE U. S. NAVY AND THE FIRST JAPANESE MISSION TO THE UNITED STATES 531
    By Lieutenant William L. Sachse, U. S. Naval Reserve
  • THE TIDE IN PHILIPPINE WATERS 543
    By H. A. Marmer, U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey
  • HIGH SPOT OF THE PACIFIC 551
    By Captain Walter C. Ford, U. S. Navy
    Just how far down the Japs got in their island hopping campaign toward the boggest island of them all, Australia, and just how far down in naval strength we sank before the tide turned, can now be reviewed.
  • AND KEEP OUR POWDER DRY 555
    By Captain Damon E. Cummings, U. S. Navy
    To reduce the likelihood of German aggression in teh next generation we need to include in our measures: Ration German stocks of strategic materials; and disestablish the Junkers (and keep our powder dry).
  • BOOK REVIEWS 559
    • Secret Mission Submarine by Lt. N. L. A. Jewell
    • Vertical Warefare by Francis Vivian Drake
    • Two Hundred Thousand Flyers by Willard Wiener
    • Asia On The Move by Bruno Lasker
  • NOTES ON INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 563
  • PROFESSIONAL NOTES 571
  • SECRETARY'S NOTES 597
  • COMBAT OPERATIONS, MARCH 1944 TO MARCH 1945 599
    By Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King, U. S. Navy

The opinions or assertions in the articles are the private ones of the writers, and are not to be construed as official or reflecting the views of the Navy Department or the naval service at large.

Published monthly at 450 Ahnaip St., Menasha, Wis.

Executive, Editorial, and Business Offices, U. S. Naval Institute, Annapolis, Md.

Advertising Department, Suite 710, 2000 Connecticut Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C.

Entered as second-class matter at the post-office at Menasha, Wis., April 4, 1922, and at the post-office at Annapolis, Md., under Act of August 4, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1919, authorized March 13, 1922. Membership dues (including Proceedings), $2.00 a year.

Subscription rate, $4.00 a year. (Foreign postage, $1.00 extra.) Single copies 50 cents.

Whole No. 507, Vol. No. 71, No. 5

Partial Listing of Photographs

  • USS Anderson
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • Navy Bombardier: Today Armies and Navies Are Built On Technicians
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • American Ship Burning from Japanese Bombs Early In The War
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • Landing Craft of the US Navy landing troops
    Official U.S. Coast Guard Photograph
  • Midshipman Learning the Fundamentals of Navigation
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • A Parachute Jumper Getting Clear Of His Chute
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • Two Crash Survivors Have Inflated Their Well-Stocked Raft And Are Good Prospects for a Rescue
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • U.S. Navy Catalina Flying Boat Has Been A Leader In Saving Pilots Down At Sea
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • The IOWA Class Battleship were made not only gun-powerful, but also as unsinkable as possible
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • Aircraft Carrier CV-16 on Manuvers
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • Navy Nurses Sightseeing on Leave
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • Reconquering the Land of Hemp
    Official U. S. Coast Guard Photograph
  • The Importance of Rope - Manila Ropes used to pull injured soldiers aboard ship
    Official U.S. Coast Guard Photograph
  • View of Manila after being bombed - It will be some time before the Islands contribute to our stockpiles again
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • Commodore Perry Landing in Japan in 1854
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • American Naval Parade in Japan During the U.S. Battle Fleet's World Cruise of 1905
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • Sixteen-inch guns from a U.S. Battleship shelling Jap positions in the Pacific
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • Soldiers Come to the shores at Leyte
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • The Right Tides Make Easy Landings
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • Depth Charge Bombs from an American Destroyer hunting out an enemy submarine
    Official U.S. Navy Photograph
  • Allied Forces Seize the Continental Beachheads
    Official U.S. Coast Guard Photograph
  • A returning transport brings back a tiny refugee from the liberated sections of the Far East
    Official U.S. Coast Guard Photograph
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