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Ladies House Jacket 350 L - 1890

Ladies House Jacket 350 L - 1890

In the present instance the jacket is shown made of geranium-red and cream-white Surah, with point de Gène lace and cord-edged ribbon for decoration.

The adjustment is performed by under-arm and side-back gores, and a curving center seam that ends below the waist-line at the top of an under folded double box-plait.

Each front is extended below the bust and turned under for a hem, over which are made two forward-turning, overlapping plaits that are well pressed in their folds and flare prettily to the lower edge.

Above the bust the fronts are cut out in V outline, and in the opening is disclosed a shirred chemisette that is made up on a plain lining of the goods and finished to form a frill at the neck; the chemisette is sewed permanently at one side and closed invisibly at the other side.

The collar provided by the pattern is here omitted, and instead is used a row of deep point de Gène lace. A ribbon bow is ornamentally placed over the closing at the bust.

The fancy sleeve is gathered at the upper and lower edges and arranged over a coat-shaped lining; the top rises stylishly above the shoulder, and the wrist is finished with a cuff that is decorated with a row of lace turned up from the edge.

Deep lace also ornaments the bottom of the jacket. The back ends of ribbon ties are plaited and inserted in the under-arm seams at the waist-line, and their front ends are tied in a bow with loops and ends at the waist-line over the closing, which is made invisibly.

Costume Options

This dainty jacket will develop handsomely in all sorts of silken and woolen textures, such as Surah, India and China silk, all wash silks, satin regents, silk-and-wool flannel, plain and figured all-wool flannel, cashmere, nun’s-vailing, Henrietta cloth and many other fashionable dress fabrics.

The chemisette furnished in the pattern is plain, but it may be formed of rows of lace or of a full section like that pictured. The garniture may consist of Vandyke-point lace, point de Gène, ribbon, etc., and feather-stitching will form a dainty decoration for the bottom of the garment.

Illustration and Pattern Information

In the present instance the jacket is shown made of geranium-red and cream-white Surah, with point de Gene lace and cord-edged ribbon for decoration.

The adjustment is performed by under-arm and side-back gores, and a curving center seam that ends below the waist-line at the top of an under folded double box-plait.

Each front is extended below the bust and turned under for a hem, over which are made two forward-turning, overlapping plaits that are well pressed in their folds and flare prettily to the lower edge.

Above the bust the fronts are cut out in V outline, and in the opening is disclosed a shirred chemisette that is made up on a plain lining of the goods and finished to form a frill at the neck; the chemisette is sewed permanently at one side and closed invisibly at the other side.

The collar provided by the pattern is here omitted, and instead is used a row of deep point de Gene lace. A ribbon bow is ornamentally placed over the closing at the bust.

The fancy sleeve is gathered at the upper and lower edges and arranged over a coat-shaped lining; the top rises stylishly above the shoulder, and the wrist is finished with a cuff that is decorated with a row of lace turned up from the edge.

Deep lace also ornaments the bottom of the jacket. The back ends of ribbon ties are plaited and inserted in the under-arm seams at the waist-line, and their front ends are tied in a bow with loops and ends at the waist-line over the closing, which is made invisibly.

Costume Options

This dainty jacket will develop handsomely in all sorts of silken and woolen textures, such as Surah, India and China silk, all wash silks, satin regents, silk-and-wool flannel, plain and figured all-wool flannel, cashmere, nun’s-vailing, Henrietta cloth and many other fashionable dress fabrics.

The chemisette furnished in the pattern is plain, but it may be formed of rows of lace or of a full section like that pictured. The garniture may consist of Vandyke-point lace, point de Gène, ribbon, etc., and feather-stitching will form a dainty decoration for the bottom of the garment.

Illustration and Pattern Information

Figure No. 350 L.—This illustrates a Ladies’ house-jacket. The pattern, which is No. 3381 and costs Is. 3d. or 30 cents, is in thirteen sizes for ladies from twenty-eight to forty-six inches, bust measure, and is seen again (below) on page 84 of this Delineator.

Ladies House Jacket Pattern No. 3381.

LADIES’ HOUSE-JACKET Pattern No. 3381.

No. 3381.— By referring to figure No. 350 L in this magazine, this jacket may be seen made of geranium-red and cream-colored Surah, point de Gène lace and ribbon providing the decoration.

The jacket is here illustrated made of Surah, with white lace, insertion, feather-stitching, and ribbon for garniture. The garment is loose-fitting in front but is prettily adjusted at the sides and back by under-arm and side-back gores, and a curving center seam that ends a little below the waist-line at the top of an under folded double box-plait.

The fronts are cutout above the bust in V shape, and below the bust they are widened considerably, each extra width being turned under for a hem and disposed in two forward-turning, overlapping plait«, which are well pressed in their folds to the lower edge.

Each front is ornamented back of the plaits with a row of lace insertion, and the jacket is decorated with a line of feather-stitching made about hem depth from the bottom. At the neck is a deep collar that tapers narrowly toward the front ends and is covered with three frills of lace.

A fancy chemisette is disclosed at the neck, being sewed permanently to the left side and closed invisibly at the right side; it is formed of strips of insertion alternating with narrow ribbon, and a standing frill of lace decorates the upper edge and is continued across the back.

The shirt sleeves are gathered at the upper and lower edges and finished with deep wristbands of insertion that are each decorated with a plaited frill of lace.

A ribbon bow is ornamentally placed over the ends of the collar, and ribbon ties, the plaited ends of which are inserted in the under-arm seams, are tied in a bow at the front to hold the front in closely.

Costume Options

Such a house-jacket will develop charmingly in all varieties of silken, woolen and cotton textures, such as Surah, India or China silk, fancy flannel in plain or figured varieties, cashmere, foulé, camel's-hair, Canton flannel, sateen, lawn, seersucker, and a large assortment of dress goods. The decoration may consist of lace, insertion. ribbon, fancy stitching or crocheted or worsted lace.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 3381 in thirteen sizes for ladies from twenty- eight to forty-six inches, bust measure.

To make the garment for a lady of medium size, requires five yards of material twenty-two inches wide, or three yards and seven-eighths twenty-seven inches wide, or two yards and seven-eighths thirty-six inches wide, or two yards and a-fourth forty-four inches wide.

Price of pattern, 1s. 3d. or 30 cents.

"Figure No. 350 L.—Ladies House Jacket," in The Delineator: A Journal of Fashion, Culture, and Fine Arts – Midsummer Number, New York: Butterick Publishing Co., Ltd, Vol. XXXVI, No. 2, August 1890, P. 77+ (For Illustrations see Page 78).

"Ladies House Jacket [Pattern No. 3381]," in The Delineator: A Journal of Fashion, Culture, and Fine Arts – Midsummer Number, New York: Butterick Publishing Co., Ltd, Vol. XXXVI, No. 2, August 1890, P. 82 (For Illustrations see Page 84).

Editor's Note: Some terminology used in the description of women's clothing during the 1800s and early 1900s has been changed to reflect more modern terms. For example, a women's "Toilette" -- a form of costume or outfit has an entirely different common meaning in the 21st century. Typical terms applied to "toilette" include outfit, ensemble, or costume, depending on context.

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