Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Woollen System

The "Jaeger" System of clothing is the natural and, therefore, the most comfortable and hygienic clothing for the human body. Pure Jaeger Wool - the ideal garment for all sports - On steamships or as country wear. Jaeger of London specialized in fine Women's Fashion Clothing.

Log of Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Wollen System Co.

Trade Mark and Logo of Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Woollen System. Cunard Daily Bulletin, Fashion & Pleasure Resorts Edition, 1906. GGA Image ID # 165fb06bae

Pure Jaeger Wool

Those who travel are necessarily exposed to varying degrees of heat and cold often to extreme heat by day and excessive cold by night.

Jaeger Day and Night Wear is the safest wear for all climes at all times. It is pure wool; at fixed moderate prices.

Ask or write for Illustrated Price List and Patterns.

See The "Jaeger" Name or This Tab on Every Garment.

London: 126, Regent Street, W. 456, Strand, Charing Cross, W.C. 30, Sloane Street, S.W. 115, Victoria Street, S.W. 85 & 86, Cheapside, E.C.

The Jaeger Goods are sold in most towns. Address sent on application to Wholesale and Shipping Offices, 95, Milton Street, London, E.C.

1906 Print Advertisement for Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Wollen System Co. Ltd. Cunard Daily Bulletin, Fashion & Pleasure Resorts Edition, 1906.

1906 Print Advertisement for Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Wollen System Co. Ltd. Cunard Daily Bulletin, Fashion & Pleasure Resorts Edition, 1906. GGA Image ID # 165fb3abed

"Jaeger" Special Pure Wool Underwear for Fall and Winter

In all sizes, styles, and weights for men, women, and children. The "Jaeger" System of clothing is the natural and, therefore, the most comfortable and hygienic clothing for the human body.

It not only enhances your health and comfort; and protects your system against disease, but in the end, it is by far the, most economical form of dress. Jaeger wear is in itself very durable, and fewer garments are required.

1907 Print Advertisement for Dr. Jaeger Special Pure Wool Underwear for Fall & Winter, Cunard Daily Bulletin, Fashion & Pleasure Resorts Edition, 1907.

1907 Print Advertisement for Dr. Jaeger Special Pure Wool Underwear for Fall & Winter, Cunard Daily Bulletin, Fashion & Pleasure Resorts Edition, 1907. GGA Image ID # 165fd2724d

Jaeger Pure Wool is the most Comfortable Durable and Hygienic

  1. Jaeger Pure Wool is the most Comfortable Durable and Hygienic
    Because it is made of Jaeger Stockinet Web which is elastic, causing it to fit perfectly all over the body, and it is so soft that no irritation is caused to the most sensitive of skins. Being porous it allows the skin to breathe.
  2. Because it is made from carefully selected natural (undyed) wool, this wool is far more durable than wool which has been dyed and chemically treated. With ordinary care, Jaeger Underwear will last 4 or 5 seasons.
  3. Being a slow conductor of heat, it keeps the body at an equable warmth in all weathers -- thus preventing chills. Moreover, by keeping the skin active, it drains the tissues of superfluous fat and water with a consequent hardening effect on the whole system.

Underwear for Fall and Winter

Thus for you to wear Jaeger Pure Wool Underwear day and night is to have increased vitality, better health, and immunity, from many a cold and chill.

The "Reason Why" is told in Dr. Jaeger's book on "Health Culture" (201 pages, cloth bound). A copy of this interesting book, together with our descriptive catalog, will be, mailed free to any address.

Don't merely ask for wool underwear but insist on having Jaeger Pure Natural Wool. Every Jaeger garment is stamped with this trademark and is guaranteed against shrinkage. Sold at fixed moderate prices by leading dealer in all principal cities.

Dr. Jaeger's Co., Ltd.

316 St. Catherine St. W., Montreal
286 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg
dealers in all principal cities

Pure Jaeger Golfers - 1908

Pure Jaeger Wool - the ideal garment for all sports - On steamships or as country wear. Jaeger of London specialized in fine Women's Fashion Clothing - a 1908 version of sports clothing.

The image in the advertisement projects that the fashions were more for spectators than for participants.

Pure Jaeger Golfers.

The Best and Smartest of Their Kind.

Ideal Garments for All Sports--For Steamer, River, Seaside, and Country Wear.

1908 Print Advertisement for Pure Jaeger Golfers - London. Cunard Daily Bulletin Supplement, 1908.

1908 Print Advertisement for Pure Jaeger Golfers - London. Cunard Daily Bulletin Supplement, 1908. GGA Image ID # 165fdc1f3c

Style 957. 19 6.

The above illustration is one of the latest of the 21 styles of Golfers we are showing this season and can be supplied in 40 different shades.

Write for Our Special Golfer Booklet, Post Free.

London:

  • 126, Regent Street, W.
  • 456, Strand, Charing Cross, W.C.
  • 115, Victoria Street, S.W.
  • 30, Sloane Street, S.W.         
  • 85 And 86, Cheapside, E.C.

The Jaeger Goods are sold in most towns. Address sent on application to Head Office, 95, Milton Street, London, E.C.

Turner & Dunnett, Printers, Liverpool.

1892 Print Advertisement for Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Woolen System Co. The Christian Union, 15 October 1892.

1892 Print Advertisement for Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Woolen System Co. The Christian Union, 15 October 1892. GGA Image ID # 166026e555

NEW INVENTIONS. DR. JAEGER'S SYSTEM OF SANITARY WOOLLEN CLOTHING.

Mention has been made on more than one occasion in the columns of the Sanitary Record of the Sanitary Woollen Clothing invented by Dr. Jaeger, of Stuttgart, which was introduced here about three years since in the form of underclothing for both sexe«, and received the unqualified approval of many members of the medical profession.

The underclothing, however, is only a portion of the system advocated by the inventor, who contends that every article of clothing should be composed of pore wool, and that bed clothing should be made of the same material.

The introduction of the underclothing would appear to have been effected before the promoters were ready to carry out their projects, for the establishments they opened were suddenly closed, much to the regret of many who were prepared to aid the movement, and the underclothing could only be obtained at one or two establishments for the sale of hygienic clothing, and has almost been forgotten.

At length arrangements have been made for the introduction of the Sanitary Woollen Clothing into the United Kingdom in its entirely. Dr. Jaeger has relegated his patent rights to Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Woollen System Company, Limited, and premises have been taken at 42 and 43 Fore Street. E.C., which will shortly be opened, and these will be supplemented by others for retail business in London and in other parts of the country as the trade develops itself.

As the writer proposes to return to this subject as soon as the arrangements a-e completed, it is only needful now to state that an opportunity has been accorded him of examining many of the patterns proposed to be introduced for different kinds of clothing.

Besides the underclothing, he has seen the material intended for boots, for outer garments both for men and women, even including lace for trimmings, all of pure wool and of a most silky texture; also for hats and for bed-clothes, the latter being of a desirable character.

Tailors will be kept on the premises for the making of men's clothing, and ladies' department with female assistants has been established. One advantage of Dr. Jaeger's system is a considerable reduction in the weight of clothing usually worn, while warmth in those regions of the body which require the most care is duly provided for.

The underclothing has been extensively worn since its introduction, and has received a general consensus of approval on its intrinsic merits.

Summary of Dr. Gustav Jaeger's Clothing Reform And Sanitary Woolen System

THE, INDISPUTABLY, PERNICIOUS EFFECTS, upon health, due to the material and form of the ordinary clothing of the present day, were hardly suspected until Dr. Gustav Jaeger, of Stuttgart, began to publish the results of his investigation on the subject.

This distinguished German physician has established the fact, that most bodily derangements may be prevented or cured, or greatly alleviated, by the adoption of proper clothing ; and he has constructed a system based on the principle of pure, animal fiber, for clothing and bedding. This is known as "Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Woolen System."

It affords to the body the greatest protection against Cold, Heat and Dampness, with the least obstruction to the body's exhalations. These conditions are instinctively felt to be better fulfilled by woolen, than by linen or cotton fabrics.

Hence the very general use of flannel garments by athletes and by members of cricket, boating, and other sporting clubs, who are called upon to engage in vigorous, physical exercise likely to cause profuse perspiration, which is simply an intensification of the action of the skin, incessantly going on, with more or less activity, and ceasing only with life itself. Dr. Jaeger reasons as follows : If this action of the skin be imperfect, impeded, or repressed by any cause, fat and water accumulate in the tissues, the functional powers of which are lowered and weakened ; and the flesh, which should feel elastic, firm and hard, becomes soft and flabby, resulting in a general derangement of the physical organization ; and the evil effect on the body is experienced in the form of many disorders which are erroneously considered to be more or less inevitable and ineradicable,—such as corpulence, asthma, pulmonary complaints, diseases of the digestive organs, gout, rheumatism, etc.

All fabrics manufactured of, or adulterated with, vegetable fiber, (linen or cotton,) or silk, are impervious to the body's exhalations, which are arrested and turned to water on the skin, if, at any point underclothing or lining of such fiber, intervene, between the body and the outer atmosphere Linen and cotton are, moreover, good conductors of heat, and thus, especially when damp, readily cause a chill. Further, dead vegetable fiber has the same property that the living plant has, of absorbing noxious gases; but it cannot, like the plant, digest or assimilate them.

In view, therefore, of the importance of maintaining a healthy and normal action of the skin, not only for persons of active habits and pursuits, but especially for those engaged in sedentary occupations, Dr. Jaeger selects Animal wool as the proper substance for his " Sanatory Clothing," and rejects all linen, cotton and silk for underwear and for bedding, as obstructive of the natural processes of absorption and evaporation. The advantages of this material seem obvious, as, when woven into tissues, wool possesses above all textile fabrics—

  1. A peculiar power of absorption and transmission.
  2. The properties of a non-conductor of heat—so essential to the preservation of an equable temperature of the body.
  3. The property of promoting the elimination, from the tissues, of all excess of fat and water, thus making the flesh firm, and hardening and toughening the muscles.

As hitherto woven, woolen fabrics are objectionable to many, because they irritate the skin and cause a feeling of intense discomfort, by preventing the proper escape of the exudations of the skin ; and, as a rule, they are so heavy as to be intolerable for summer wear.

To remove these objectionable features, and to make woolen clothing truly sanatory, and suitable for all seasons—protecting from oppressive heat in summer and maintaining a proper degree of warmth in winter—Dr. Jaeger has materially modified the usual processes of weaving woolen fabrics, and adopted a method which produces a much less closely-woven texture than the ordinary flannel; and all underwear for ladies, gentlemen and children, is made of " Stockinet," undyed or natural gray, very porous, agreeable and durable.

From these conditions, together with the conformity in construction of the garments, to the human anatomy, arise what Dr. Jaeger specifically claims as
THE SANITARY ADVANTAGES OF PURE ANIMAL WOOL.

I.             Wool "gently stimulates the skin;" i. e., to that degree necessary to excite and maintain its normal activity in secreting and extruding the waste matter, and surplus fat and water of the body.

II.           Wool, relatively to linen and cotton, is a nonconductor of heat and electricity, and, therefore, tends to preserve to the animal body its normal measure of these vital energies.

III.          Wool, woven and made up according to the Jaeger methods, by reason of its permeability to moisture, (the vaporous exhalations of the skin,) promotes the elimination of the effete matters, and the reduction of the abnormal or excessive heat of the animal body; and this is the reason why the body, even token freely perspiring, remains dry in woolen clothing, while in linen or cotton, it becomes wet—a fact of common experience with all who engage in athletic exercises.

IV.          Wool thus co-operates with the skin to regulate, by its exhalations, the temperature of the body, the wool supplementing the efforts of the skin to dispose of excess of heat, whether proceeding from internal or external sources, thus maintaining that equable state which is the true condition of health and comfort. Hence it is, that wool is better than linen or cotton as a preventive of the overheating of the blood, through internal heat; and that woolen clothing is less oppressively hot than linen or cotton in summer, and, therefore, more agreeable and healthful in the hottest climates.

V. Wool is electrical, while linen and cotton are not; i. e., wool generates electricity, but does not conduct it. It follows, therefore, that a body clothed in wool loses less of its animal electricity, while fresh electricity is produced on the surface. Most people are familiar with the facility with which the human body conducts electricity. Cotton ranks next to it as a conductor, while wool is classed with non-conductors and insulators, and, for that reason, is called an electric, or generator of electricity. When the air is clear and dry, place a person upon a stool or chair, the legs of which are supported from the floor by glass tumblers, and beat him gently on the back with a woolen or camel-hair shawl, and sparks may be drawn from his nose, or fingers, from one- fourth to three-fourths of an inch long—or large enough to light the gas of a burner, or to charge a Leyden jar. Probably every reader has seen and heard electric sparks on withdrawing a woolen stocking—never from taking off a cotton one. There is no manifest electricity, in the latter case, because the cotton fiber conducts it away—dissipates it.

The Sanitary Woolen System is, therefore, salutary for those whose bodies are deficient in animal heat or electricity. With persons leading sedentary lives, the action of the skin is deficient, and it requires the stimulating aid of the woolen clothing, which materially assists in eliminating from the tissues the excess of water and fatty matter always tending to accumulate when insufficient exercise is taken.

Chills caused by draughts, or colds, damp clothes or bedding, are very dangerous, because the sudden suppression of the cutaneous exudations, interferes with the circulation of the blood, thus disturbing the action of the lungs, the liver, the stomach, etc., and setting up conditions favorable to inflammation and fever.

Their modus operandi may be summarized as follows:

The exhalations which are " mal-odorous " and noxious by reason of defective excretory action, are generated in the body during and after the digestion of food, during all vital action in fact, or when the body is invaded by disease, or the mind is at work, or disturbed by worry, gloom, anger or fear, or indeed by any violent passion or strong emotion.

For every act of mind or body, is attended with destruction of tissue, constituting so much waste matter, which becomes poisonous and potent for mischief, if not duly eliminated from the body. This elimination it is the function of the skin, in an eminent degree, to do. The sudorific or sweat glands, and their ducts, are charged with this important office.

There are about 7,000,000 of these little scavengers opening at the surface of the skin of an average-sized man, throwing off from the surface from 28 to 32 ounces of refuse matter every 24 hours. The action of even a small portion of them, cannot be suspended without disturbance and danger.

The body not only gives off its exhalations to the surrounding air, but also communicates them to all objects with which it and its atmosphere come in contact.

Metallic substances, glass, and wood of which the pores are closed by paint, varnish, etc., are practically impervious to the exhalations, while the two classes of material next mentioned absorb them, but in a very different degree.

I.             All vegetable fibers, such as linen, cotton, hemp, jute, paper, unvarnished and unpainted wood; silk, and unsanitary dyed or dressed wool and leather, attract and absorb these "noxious," "self-poisoning" exhalations, and become, when in contact with human beings, gradually offensive and even poisonous in their effect. Clothing, (including linings and padding,) and bedding made from such fibers, are agreeable and wholesome only when quite new and just washed, but soon become saturated with the " noxious" exhalations, producing discomfort, and, if wet, when the vapors are set free, becoming especially dangerous.

II.           All kinds of animal wool and hair, leather, (undressed, or sanitarily dressed and dyed,) feathers, horn, readily absorb all the excretions of the skin, but 'they do not retain them, but transmit, and disperse them at their outer surfaces, by a repulsive energy to which the self-cleansing properties of hair and wool fabrics are properly due. The value of this feature of the woolen system, more particularly with reference to its surgical uses, is hardly to be exaggerated.

To secure its full benefits, the System should be adopted in its entirety. A beginning may be made with underclothing, which is of the first importance. The outer clothing should be constructed after the Sanitary styles. The upper and lower coverings of the bed should be woolen or camelhair. The sleeping suit should be a stockinet night-shirt, long, light, soft and elastic; or a woolen shirt with a combination consisting of drawers and socks.

"New Inventions: Dr. Jaeger's System of Sanitary Wollen Clothing," in The Sanitary Record: A Monthly Journal of Public Health and the Progress of Sanitary Science, London: Smith, Elder & Co., Vol. V (New Series), Vol. XV (Old Series), No. 8, 15 February 1884, p. 414

Gustav Jaeger, M.D., Stuttgart, "Summary of Dr. Gustav Jaeger's Clothing Reform and Sanitary Woolen System," in Selections from Essays on Health-Culture And the Sanitary Woolen System, New York: Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Woolen System Co., 1891, pp. 1-8.

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