A G Hyde And Sons Heatherbloom Petticoat™

1908 Print Advertisement for the Heatherbloom Petticoat™ Manufactured by A. G. Hyde & Sons, New York and Chicago. The Delineator, December 1908.

1908 Print Advertisement for the Heatherbloom Petticoat™ Manufactured by A. G. Hyde & Sons, New York and Chicago. The Delineator, December 1908. GGA Image ID # 1656b858f5

Heatherbloom Petticoat™ The trend of gift-giving to-day is decidedly toward the more practical—toward presents that combine utility and luxury at a reasonable outlay.

Nowhere do these qualities so forcibly assert themselves as in the smart Heatherbloom Petticoats which have taken the well-dressed American woman by storm, bringing to her permanently the very attributes she found so perishable in silk.

For any woman of any age these distinctive garments offer a happy combination of richness, usefulness, beauty, durability.

Heatherbloom possesses the very essence of silk-daintiness—in finish, rustle, sheen and wears three times as long. All the better shops are showing Heatherbloom Petticoats in counterpart designs of the latest silk garments from Paris, at but a third of their cost.

Plaids and stripes, plain effects and embroidered, modish colorings to meet every fancy. Elaborateness of workmanship determines the price- $2 to $S. For gift purposes, many stores are offering Heatherbloom Petticoats in handsomely decorated Christmas boxes.

Heatherbloom is of One Quality Only.

Heatherbloom by the Yard 40 cents.

Its matchless beauty and wonderful wearing properties commend it as a substitute for silk for most uses -linings, drop-skirts, foundations, etc. All shades—at lining counters, in one quality only.

Heatherbloom on every yard, and every yard guaranteed. Send for series of beautiful Souvenir Post Cards —FREE.

A. G. HYDE & SONS, New York- Chicago

Makers of Hydegrade Fabrics

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