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Maternity Clothing Fashions 1900s

While maternity clothes existed before 1900, maternity fashions were rarely featured in the fashion magazines of the early 1900s. Often uncomfortable with corsets, the more recent vintage maternity wear offered styles that worked, focusing on the practical over stylish.

A Patented Brassiere for Maternity Wear

A Patented Brassiere for Maternity Wear

A practical garment which allows for expansion at the waist, without lessening the firm support needed at the bust.

From Lane Bryant.

"A Patented Brassiere for Maternity Wear," in The Corset and Underwear Review, New York: The Haire Publishing Co., Inc., Vol. VI, No. 2, November 1915, p. 43.

 

An Anatomically Correct Maternity Supporter

An Anatomically Correct Maternity Supporter

A model admirably designed to provide the needed abdominal and back support during the period of child carrying. With it, a brassiere or bust confiner should be worn to care for the upper figure.

From the Gage-Downs Co.

“An Anatomically Correct Maternity Supporter,” in The Corset and Underwear Review, New York: The Haire Publishing Co., Inc., Vol. VI, No. 1, October 1915, p.33.

Maternity Corset Waist

Maternity Corset Waist

Maternity corset waist which is built on entirely different lines from other maternity corsets. It is designed and constructed to combine comfort, safety, and the retention of a smart, stylish figure for mothers during prospective motherhood and also for convalescents during the convalescing period.

The elastic webbing insertion, down the front and back, yields to any extraordinary movement and provides firm, but gentle support to the abdomen.

“A SUCCESSFUL “H. & W." MATERNITY MODEL. STYLE NO. 2360.”, The Corset and Underwear Review, New York: The Haire Publishing Company, Vol. II, No. 2, November 1913, p. 23.

Maternity Dress and Corset

Maternity Dress and Corset

A maternity dress that is youthful, fashionable, and trim, while at the same time it is constructed along the approved lines for comfort and health. It is made of printed novelty check fine cotton voile, with dainty collar and cuffs of white organdie bound with voile and trimmed with rick rack braid.

The black moire ribbon girdle is adjustable, and the white net waist lining is made with an elastic waistband.

Among the unique features are the panels, front and back, that extends below the belt, and the charming side drapery of the tunics—both contrived to give the desirable straight line. A decided advantage is the fact that the dress may be used for general wear after it is no longer needed for maternity wear.

The dress comes in navy and white or green and white. Bust sizes, 34 to 46. Price, $10.95. Order by normal size.

A maternity and convalescent corset; also suitable for use as a nursing corset. It is unique in that it is constructed on the theory of the “sling support” for the abdomen—a new idea that has high medical approval.

It’s adjusted to the increasing size of the figure, by back lacings, and by side-front lacing devices, which give added room at the top of the corset as it is needed, and at the same time automatically adjust the lower part of the corset to provide the necessary added support to the lower part of the abdomen.

The corset is of coutil lightly boned, but very strong and flexible. Above the short flexible front steel, and covering part of it, there is a flap with rubber inserts and adjusted by buttons on one side.

This flap, in addition to the low cut of the whole corset, makes it useful for nursing. Just as the corset is adjusted to the increasing figure, so it may be readjusted as the figure becomes normal. Sizes, 24 to 36. Price, $6.00.

Excerpt from "Ready-Made Garments for Mother and Child," in Woman's Home Companion, Springfield, OH: The Crowell Publishing Company, Vol. 48, No. 6, June 1921, p. 57.

Note: We have edited this text to correct grammatical errors and improve word choice to clarify the article for today’s readers. Changes made are typically minor, and we often left passive text “as is.” Those who need to quote the article directly should verify any changes by reviewing the original material.

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Vintage Maternity Fashions Archives