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US Navy Decorations and Citations - January 1945

Decorations and Citations reported in January 1945 include: Unit Citation Awarded to Four Subs, Two LCTs and Marine Division; Sub CO Wins 3 Navy Crosses; Gold Star in Lieu of Second Navy Cross; Navy Cross; Gold Star in Lieu of Third Distinguished Service Medal; Gold Star in Lieu of Second Distinguished Service Medal; Distinguished Service Medal; Gold Star in Lieu of Third Legion of Merit; Gold Star In Lieu of Second Legion of Merit; Legion of Merit; Gold Star in Lieu of Second Silver Star Medal; Silver Star Medal; Gold Star in Lieu of Second Distinguished Flying Cross; Distinguished Flying Cross; and Navy and Marine Corps Medal.

For reasons of security, the deed for which a man receives a decoration often cannot be fully described either in this section or in the actual citation which he receives. There may accordingly be reports here which do not tell the whole story.

United States Navy Cross Recipients - Reported January 1945

Photographs not available of Lt. (jg) John R. Rock, USNR; Loran E. Barbour, ACOM, USNR; John H. Line, GM2c, USNR; Frederick L. Erickson, Cox., USNR; Report of citation of James W. Daugherty, CWT, USNR, appeared in the December 1944 issue of the Information Bulletin, p. 56.

Unit Citation Awarded to Four Subs, Two LCTs and Marine Division

Four submarines, two tank landing craft and the 4th Marine Division, Reinforced, have received Presidential Unit Citations for outstanding performance in combat.

These included the second award to the USS Guardfish, cited for her bold raids on Japanese shipping during her eighth war patrol. She struck fiercely at combatant units and heavily escorted convoys and inflicted severe damage in important vessels sunk or damaged.

The USS Tang was cited for distinguished service during her first three war patrols in Japanese-controlled waters. Besides sinking thousands of tons of enemy shipping, she braved treacherous reefs off the coast of an enemy stronghold to rescue 22 naval aviators in seven pick-ups within close range of hostile shore batteries.

The citation was awarded to the USS Rasher for striking hard at heavily escorted Japanese convoys during her first, third, fourth and fifth war patrols. In bold defiance of watchful and aggressive enemy air patrols she penetrated deep into forward areas, inflicting tremendous losses in thousands of tons of valuable shipping sunk or damaged.

The fourth submarine, the USS Silversides, was cited for daring tactics in the face of particularly hazardous conditions during her fourth, fifth, seventh and tenth war patrols in Japanese-controlled waters. In audacious defiance of heavy enemy escorts and air opposition, she struck repeatedly at every quarter with devastating results to the Japanese, destroying 24 ships and damaging 12.

Defying terrific artillery and machine-gun fire, the LCT(5) 30 went through mined waters off the coast of Normandy, ramming and breaching enemy-placed obstacles at full speed to clear a channel for the assault waves standing off shore. She boldly fought it out with enemy shore guns and, by her gallant example, inspired the remaining craft to follow with their vehicles and men.

The LCT(6) 540 was rocked by blasts from German 88-mm. cannon as she approached the Normandy beach, her gun turrets wrecked, fires blazing aboard, her officer-in-charge killed and eight of her men casualties. She hit the beach on schedule and operated 24 hours a day until 9 June, beaching her cargo while still under fire and returning repeatedly to place equipment, supplies and troops ashore.

Valiantly storming the fortifications of Saipan on 15 June, the 4th Marine Division, Reinforced, blasted the stubborn defenses of the enemy in an undeviating advance over perilously rugged terrain. Despite heavy casualties, it pursued the Japanese for 25 days, crushing all resistance in its zone of action. After a brief rest, the division hurled its full fighting power against the narrow beaches of Tinian on 24 July. Unchecked by natural obstacles or hostile fire, it swept Japanese forces before it and ravaged all opposition within eight days.

Sub CO Wins 3 Navy Crosses

For extraordinary heroism as commanding officer of a submarine which sank nine Japanese ships, damaged three, damaged and probably sank another and sank an additional 18,000 tons of enemy shipping, Cmdr. John S. Coye Jr., USN, Worcester, Mass., has been awarded the Navy Cross and two gold stars in lieu of a second and third. His ship, the USS Silversides, recently received the Presidential Unit Citation (see first column).

The first Navy Cross was awarded to Commander Coye for courageously and repeatedly delivering skillful torpedo attacks on two occasions, sinking four enemy vessels and probably sinking another. His attack on a heavily escorted convoy which resulted in the sinking of shipping totaling over 18,000 tons merited the second award. He received the third Navy Cross for torpedo attacks which sank five enemy ships totaling 23,600 tons and damaged three others totaling 18,000 tons.

Gold Star in Lieu of Second Navy Cross

★ Lt. (jg) Phil H. Bucklew, USNR, Ashville, Ohio: As scout boat officer during the invasion of Normandy, he embarked in one of the first craft to approach the strongly defended coast and succeeded in locating the beaches to be assaulted. Despite heavy surf and harassing enemy fire, he led the first wave of tanks to the beach and took up his station near the beach to act as a guide. Under heavy enemy fire he rescued wounded personnel from the water near their burning landing craft and carried them to safety.

Navy Cross

★ Cmdr. Stanley M. Barnes, USN, Cambridge, MA.: As commander of a motor torpedo boat squadron during the Tunisian and Sicilian campaigns, he often personally led his squadron in carrying out patrol and reconnaissance missions of inestimable value to our forces and made daring raids on hostile shipping. From 1 to 20 Aug. 1943, he directed offensive sweeps which resulted in the capture of the Eolie Islands, contributing materially to the advance of the 7th Army toward Messina.

★ Cmdr. Charles W. Brewer, USN, Tulsa, OK. (missing in action): As commander of a carrier-based fighter squadron in the vicinity of the Marianas on 19 June 1944, he led component parts of his squadron to intercept Jap planes attempting to reach our fleet and personally accounted for three of the 60 Jap planes destroyed. Later he led the six planes remaining aboard his carrier to Guam and, in the face of overwhelming odds, shot down two enemy planes and contributed to the destruction or rout of the remainder.

★ Cmdr. Seymour D. Owens, USN, Marblehead, Mass, (posthumously): Detailed to cover the left flank of a feint landing south of Tinian town to draw enemy fire away from the actual landings to the north, he maneuvered his ship perilously close inshore in the face of heavy fire from Japanese coastal defense guns and skillfully directed effective fire support for the boat waves until he was killed at his post.

★ Lt. Frank M. Hall, (MC) USNR, Jamestown, N. Y.: In charge of a naval beach party medical team during the invasion of Normandy, he swam three miles to shore when his own landing craft was sunk. Completely unmindful of his own danger, he labored under terrific enemy fire with such meager supplies as he was able to salvage from the dead and wounded, lie assumed command of all medical work on an additional beach when it was determined that the officer-in-charge was missing in action, and skillfully covered two beaches without relief until the afternoon of D-day-plus-two.

★ Lt. William E. Peterson Jr., USNR, Burlington, Vt.: As commanding officer of an LST in the Southwest Pacific, he opened up a barrage of accurate antiaircraft fire when Jap dive- bombers attacked at 500 feet and sent two planes crashing in flames. When a direct bomb hit started fires in ammunition and gasoline compartments and wounded many members of the crew, he calmly organized fire and rescue parties. His presence of mind and devotion to duty undoubtedly saved his ship and the lives of many members of his crew.

★ Lt. Charles S. Potter, USNR, New York, N. Y.: Although wounded by enemy shell fire during the assault on Normany, he refused to be hospitalized. When all personnel had been ordered to take cover, he fearlessly exposed himself in order to direct incoming assault waves to successful landings.

★ Lt. (jg) Grant G. Andreasen, USNR, Homer, Idaho: As scout boat officer during the invasion of Normandy, he succeeded in the highly important mission of locating the beaches to be assaulted and went in close to the beach to act as a guide for the approaching wave of DD tanks. From an advanced position he fired rockets from his craft, at target objectives and rendered close fire support to the infantry assault waves. Later he rescued wounded personnel from burning landing craft under heavy enemy fire and carried them to safety.

★ Lt. (jg) Stuart L. Brandel, USNR, Los Angeles, Calif.: As a naval gunfire liaison officer during the invasion of France he established radio communication with a cruiser when his boat was twice driven off in attempting to land and was thus able to fire several effective missions at a critical juncture. After landing he took over the duties of his seriously wounded forward observer and called for and adjusted fire which was of marked effect on enemy positions.

★ Lt. (jg) John R. Cox Jr., USNR, Los Angeles, Calif.: As executive officer of the YMS 2U during minesweeping operations in support of the invasion of southern France, he took charge when his commanding officer became a casualty and labored to save his ship after her bow had been blown off by a mine. Failing in this, he directed the removal of the wounded and risked his life by entering every compartment in search of missing or trapped men. When another mine exploded under the stern of one of the rescue vessels alongside, he jumped into the water between the two-foundering craft and rescued a critically injured man who was in danger of drowning.

★ Lt. (jg) William M. Jenkins, USNR, Everett, Wash.: As officer-in-charge of a naval combat demolition unit during the invasion of Normandy, he and his crew accomplished the difficult task of blowing a 50-yard gap in beach obstacles despite the fact that the LCT to which he was assigned sank prior to H hour. When the party's CPO was killed while preparing a demolition charge, he completed the task himself, and personally placed a number of charges.

★ Lt. (jg) Kenneth* S. Norton, USNR, Oberlin, Kans.: As a naval gunfire liaison officer in the assault on Normandy, he landed with the first wave of rangers and was one of the first up the cliff at Pointe du Hoe. When the rangers were surrounded by enemy troops in superior numbers, he called for and adjusted fire in great volume and with marked accuracy. Without this accurate fire the rangers probably could not have survived. He was wounded on the evening of D day but continued his efforts and, after being treated on the USS Texas, returned to the battlefield and resumed his duties.

★ Lt. (jg) John R. Rock, USNR, San Francisco, Calif.: Observing that another LCT(5) was in a sinking condition during the invasion of France, with the officer-in-charge severely wounded, he left his own ship in command of his assistant and boarded the sinking craft. He successfully beached the stricken LCT (5) and discharged its load. When it was completely disabled by enemy shells, he swam ashore for medical assistance, despite the handicap of a broken arm.

★ Ens. Lawrence S. Karnowski,(CEC) USNR, Lawrence, Kans.: As officer-in- charge of a naval combat demolition unit during the invasion of Normandy, he succeeded in clearing a 50-yard gap through enemy beach obstacles under heavy artillery and rifle fire. He exposed himself to enemy fire to rescue a wounded member of his crew who was in danger of drowning in the rising tide. Time after time he returned alone to place charges to widen the gap after the rest of his crew had been killed or wounded.

★ Ens. William L. Wilhoit, USNR, Atlanta, Ga.: Severely wounded during the first moments of the assault on Normandy when nine shattering blasts from German 88-mm. cannon crippled his ship, killed his officer-in-charge and injured seven crewmen, he assumed command of the LCT(6) 5U0. Despite his extreme youth and lack of combat experience, he maneuvered the now unwieldy craft toward the beach through obstacles and mines. During the ensuing four days he carried on in the repeated landing of equipment, supplies and troops, inspiring his crew to supreme effort.

★ Loran E. Barbour, ACOM, USNR, Vallejo, Calif.: In command of a naval demolition unit during the invasion of Normandy, he showed exceptional bravery, leadership, and initiative in placing of charges and the blowing of a 50-yard gap in enemy beach obstacles. Although severely wounded, he calmly directed the marking of the gap through which troops could be landed, and later supervised the evacuation of casualties.

★ John H. Line, GM2c, USNR, Harrisburg, Pa.: As a member of a naval demolition unit during the invasion of Normandy, he landed on the beach at H-hour-plus-3-minutes and assisted in blowing a 50-yard gap in the obstacles on the beach. Although half of the crew were killed before the mission was completed, he carried on in the face of heavy gunfire. Later, he directed incoming craft through the gap and exposed, himself on numerous occasions while administering to and removing wounded personnel to places of safety.

★ Frederick L. Erickson, Cox., USNR, Des Moines, Iowa: While serving as helmsman in an LST during operations against Lae on 4 Sept. 1943, he was severely wounded by the impact of a direct bomb hit which blew him out of the pilot house. Upon recovering consciousness he returned to his battle station, and, despite acute pain and waning strength, gamely endeavored to hold the stricken ship on her course until he was relieved by one of his shipmates.

Gold Star in Lieu of Third Distinguished Service Medal

★ Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher, USN, Oklahoma City, Okla.: As Commander Fast Carrier Task Forces, Pacific, in the Central and Western Pacific from 19 March to 27 August 1944, he led his forces in daring and brilliantly executed attacks against heavily fortified Japanese bases at Palau, Yap and Woleai. Forces under his command covered our amphibious landing at Hollandia, carried out a two-day attack on Truk, Satawan, and Ponape in preparation for the invasion of Saipan. During the early stages of the actual landing he sighted the Japanese fleet at maximum range and launched an attack with planes of his Task Force 58, first disrupting an enemy sortie threatening the operation and then winning the Battle of the Philippine Sea.

★ Vice Admiral Richmond K. Turner, USN, Carmel, Calif.: As Commander Joint Expeditionary Force in action against the enemy-held Marianas Islands from 24 May to 12 August 1944, he handled the ever-changing complexities of his assignment with marked facility and decisive judgment and conducted the operations of his command boldly and with superb tactical ability. Working tirelessly in direct command of the Northern Assault Force which attacked Saipan, he organized antisubmarine and antiaircraft defenses and correlated air, naval and ground forces to blast through the enemy’s strong defenses and wage the relentless, devastating battle which resulted in the capture of this important stronghold.

Gold Star in Lieu of Second Distinguished Service Medal

★ Rear Admiral Richard L. Conolly, USN, Waukegan, Ill.: As a group commander of the amphibious forces of the Pacific Fleet, he brought the officers, men, and ships of his command to a high state of combat readiness in preparation for our assault on the island of Guam. He led the determined armada into dangerous, enemy-con- trolled waters where he unleashed the full power of his force in a furious onslaught which crushed the enemy’s fanatical resistance and annihilated the objective in a minimum of time.

★ Rear Admiral Harry W. Hill, USN, Washington, D. C.: As a group commander of the amphibious forces of the Pacific Fleet and second in command of the Saipan attack force he personally supervised the ship-to-shore operations of assault and garrison- force vessels with excellent control. Following the Saipan invasion, he was placed in full command of the Tinian attack force, and skillfully coordinated his units for a furious onslaught which crushed the enemy in a minimum time despite extremely unfavorable weather toward the end of hostilities.

★ Rear Admiral Spencer S. Lewis, USN, Calvert, Tex.: As commander of a naval task force prior to and during the invasion of southern France, he exercised sound judgment and keen foresight in planning the invasion operations. By the effective organization of beach maintenance operations, he assisted in enforcing the early capitulation of the strategic ports of Toulon and Marseilles.

★ Rear Admiral Alfred E. Montgomery, USN, Norfolk, Va.: As commander of a task group of carriers and screening vessels in operation against Japanese forces from March through June 1944 he enabled his aircraft to inflict great damage on enemy shipping and shore installations at Palau, Marcus, and Wake Islands and at Hollandia. His task group participated in the battle for the Marianas, contributing in large measure to the overwhelming destruction of enemy air resistance and the crippling of important units of the Japanese fleet.

★ Rear Admiral John W. Reeves Jr., USN, Coronado, Calif.: As commander of a task group of carriers and screening vessels in operation in the Pacific from March through June 1944 with brilliant tactical skill and exceptional foresight he enabled his intrepid fliers to attack hostile shipping and shore installations at Palau and Yap with exceptional success. In the battle for the Marianas his superbly coordinated forces contributed in large measure to overwhelming destruction of enemy air resistance and the crippling of important units of the Japanese fleet.

Distinguished Service Medal

★ Vice Admiral Willis A. Lee Jr., USN, Owenton, Ky.: As Commander, Battleships, Pacific Fleet, and commander of a task group operating against Japanese forces from April through June 1944 he skillfully maneuvered his ships to form a screen for our carrier units throughout numerous engagements. He directed the bombardment of shore installations at Ponape and Saipan. On 19 June when our task force was subjected to a full-scale attack by Japanese carrier-based aircraft he directed the movements of his ships for maximum effectiveness.

★ Vice Admiral Alexander Sharp, USN, Welcome, Md.: As commander of a battleship division and commander of a major task force in the Atlantic from November 1941 to October 1944, he discharged the multiple responsibilities of his command with splendid success and consistently maintained his forces in a high state of combat efficiency. As Commander, Service Force, he furnished effective logistic support for naval forces afloat in the Mediterranean and eastern Atlantic and for outlying bases in the Atlantic and European theaters.

★ Rear Admiral Joseph J. Clark, USN, Jacksonville, Fla.: As commander of a task group of carriers and screening vessels in the Pacific area from April through June 1944 he rendered invaluable assistance to our landing forces during the invasion of Hollandia and later, at Truk, helped to neutralize shore installations and planes. He contributed in large measure to our victories during the battle of the Marianas and attack on the Bonin Islands.

★ Rear Admiral William M. Fechteler, USN, San Francisco, Calif.: Directing landing operations at Los Negros, Humboldt Bay, Biak, Noemfoor Islands, and Cape Sansapor, he formulated highly efficient and flexible plans which proved of inestimable value, particularly on occasions when major landing activities required sudden changes. His close cooperation with Army and Air Force commands was largely responsible for the execution of precisely timed operations over wide areas.

★ Rear Admiral Frank J. Lowry, USN, Cresco, Iowa: As commander of a task force prior to and during the invasion of southern France he led an Allied task force to the assault area and directed landing of assault troops, supplies and mechanized equipment of the Allied 7th Army. The effective organization of maintenance activities under his inspiring command facilitated the landing of follow-up French divisions and the early capitulation of Toulon and Marseilles.

★ Rear Admiral Bertram J. Rodgers, USN, Pittsburgh, Pa.: As commander of a naval task force prior to and during the invasion of Southern France, he achieved brilliant success in the landing of assault troops, supplies and mechanized equipment of the 7th Army. His efficient direction of unloading operations of convoys were contributing factors in sustaining the rapid advance of our ground forces into enemy-held territory.

★ Rear Admiral Ernest G. Small, USN, Great Neck, N. Y.: Commanding the cruisers of a fast carrier task group during operations against the Gilberts, he provided decisive support for our amphibious landings at Tarawa and Abemama. Handicapped by limited forces and with but little air support in our assault on the Marshall Islands, he succeeded in neutralizing important Japanese bases at Wotje and Maloelap. He worked tirelessly during the powerful carrier strike against Palau, Yap and Woleai on 29-30 March and 1 April.

★ Capt. Daniel V. Gallery Jr., USN, Vienna, Va.: As commander of an Atlantic Fleet anti-submarine task group he selected the most strategic localities for his searches during a period of restricted submarine activity. Maintaining the group in a constant state of alert preparedness for combat, he directed the operations aggressively and with brilliant initiative, inflicting tremendous damage on hostile vessels.

Gold Star in Lieu of Third Legion of Merit

★ Commodore Campbell D. Edgar, USN, Cazenovia, N. Y.: As commander of a follow-up force during the invasion of Normandy he trained and welded the Army and Navy units under his command into one highly efficient amphibious force which effected a valiant landing on the beaches in the Viereville area on the afternoon of D-Day.

★ Capt. Adelbert F. Converse, USN, Wellsville, Kans.: As commander of screening destroyers during the invasion of Normandy and the assault on Cherbourg, he effectively screened the major ships and protected the minesweepers engaged in the invasion. Under his leadership the bombarding units of his command silenced many important enemy shore batteries and provided excellent support of Army troops at a crucial period.

★ Capt. Ross A. Dierdorff, USN, Annapolis, Md.: As commander of a beach assault group during the invasion of southern France, he led a convoy from mounting ports safely to the designated area and landed the troops, their equipment and supplies expeditiously. Upon completion of unloading activities, the ships under his command sailed promptly to base ports for reloading.

★ Capt. Rupert M. Zimmerli, USN, Portland, Me.: As chief of staff to a naval task force commander during the invasion of southern France, he coordinated the administrative and planning agencies during the intensive preparations for the assault. His advice and sound decisions contributed materially to the early and firm establishment of our forces ashore in enemy-held territory.

Gold Star In Lieu of Second Legion of Merit

★ Rear Admiral John L. Hall Jr., USN, Williamsburg, Va.: As commander of a naval task force prior to and during the invasion of Italy he exercised professional skill, sound judgment and great resourcefulness in directing the diverse naval and combined operations which culminated in the successful assault on the west coast of Italy.

★ Capt. (then Comdr.) Edward R. Durgin, USN, Middle Haddam, Conn.: As commander of a U. S. destroyer squadron during the invasion of Italy he skillfully disposed the ships under his command to assist in providing a screen for a major task force. He displayed keen judgment and expert tactical knowledge in the face of heavy enemy opposition.

★ Capt. Lorenzo S. Sabin Jr., USN, Dallas, Tex.: Charged with organizing and training the gunfire support for an amphibious force during the invasion of Normandy, he carried out these vital tasks with efficiency and led a convoy of 250 small craft to the Normandy coast under severe enemy fire. Later, without previous notice, he directed the unloading of all ships and craft in an assigned area and was responsible for the expeditious establishment of a naval base on the French coast.

★ Capt. Leo B. Schulten, USN, Helena, Mont.: As commander of an assault group during the invasion of Normandy he brought his transports and landing craft to their predetermined stations and successfully effected their prompt and efficient unloading. He displayed skill and sound judgment in the execution of this difficult and complex operation undertaken in darkness and in an adverse sea.

★ Capt. Rupert M. Zimmerli, USN, Portland, Me.: As commander of the assault section of a major task force during the invasion of Italy he skillfully directed the movements of approximately fifty landing craft. Subsequent to the assault his task group maintained the British 46th Division over the beaches for more than two weeks despite hostile artillery fire.

★ Lt. Comdr. Crittenden B. Taylor, USNR, Lima, Ohio: As commander of the U. S. minesweepers attached to a major task force during the invasion of Italy he displayed excellent seamanship and superb skill. He maneuvered the vessels under his command through dangerous enemy minefields and swept a clear path for our landing craft, enabling them to arrive at the transport area without loss from enemy mines.

Legion of Merit

★ Rear Admiral Theodore E. Chandler, USN, Washington, D. C.: As Commander All Forces, Aruba-Cura- cao, from 27 April 1943 to 25 July 1944, he exercised sound judgment and initiative in carrying out his many and varied tasks. He was largely responsible for the cooperative employment of U. S. and Netherlands naval and air forces in waging vigorous and effective warfare on enemy submarines. He displayed marked diplomatic ability in his contacts with Netherlands and Venezuelan civil and military officials.

★ Rear Admiral Morton L. Deyo, USN, Kittery Point, Me.: As commander of the gunfire support group of Assault Force “U” during the invasion of Normandy, he skillfully directed his forces and, by effective fire, contributed to the successful landings of the 1st U. S. Army in the Madeleine area. On 25 June, the warships under his command blasted enemy strong points in the vicinity of Cherbourg.

★ Rear Admiral (then Capt.) Paul Hendren, USN, Chapel Hill, N. C.: As commanding officer of the USS Philadelphia during the assault on Sicily, he skillfully maneuvered his ship into striking position and, within close range of enemy shore artillery and under intermittent air attack, directed the bombardment of machine-gun nests and artillery emplacements, providing excellent support for the initial landing and rapid advance inland of our troops.

★ Rear Admiral James C. Jones Jr., USN, Huntsville, Ala.: As chief of staff to Commander Southwest Pacific Force and deputy commander of Allied naval forces in the Southwest Pacific Area from February 1942 to November 1943, he rendered invaluable assistance to his force commanders, strengthened Allied relationships and coordinated U. S. naval forces with associated services. His farsighted planning contributed materially to the success of our campaign in this area.

★ Commodore James E. Boak, USN, Hughesville, Pa.: As commanding officer of a major advanced base from 1 Feb. to 1 Nov. 1943, he organized and developed this base to such a high standard of efficiency that it became an important unit for the servicing and repair of all types of ships, a major operating base for the fleet and a supply depot for the forward areas.

★ Commodore Thomas S. Combs, USN, Lamar, Mo.: As Commander U. S. Naval Aircraft, 7th Fleet, he was an inspiring and dynamic leader. Utilizing a comparatively small force of slow-flying aircraft, he developed new methods of attack procedure. His command made devastating attacks on Japanese land installations, warships and auxiliary vessels and dissipated the enemy’s resources at a crucial time.

★ Commodore Charles M. Yates, USN, Vallejo, Calif.: As Commandant, NOB, Oran, prior to and during the invasions of Sicily and the Italian mainland he efficiently reorganized various- base units to serve and maintain forces afloat. By his tact, cooperation and aggressive leadership he established an amicable relationship with Allied authorities and coordinated the combined efforts of port facilities toward full support of the forces participating in the two amphibious operations.

★ Capt. Archie A. Antrim, (SC) USN, Charleston, S. C.: As force supply officer of Service Force, South Pacific Force, from 1 Nov. 1942 to October 1943, he cooperated closely with the general purchasing agent of the Army in Australia and organized a naval supply system with depots in principal Australian ports. He ably directed and administered the purchase, storage and issue of materials required by the fleet.

★ Capt. Robert F. Batchelder, (SC) USN, Worcester, Mass.: As force supply officer, Western Naval Task Force, he planned for and provided for the necessary supplies during the invasion of Normandy. His skill and devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to the success of the Normandy campaign.

★ Capt. George W. Bauernschmidt, (SC) USN, Monkton, Md.: As supply officer in command of the naval supply depot at NOB, Oran, prior to and during the invasions of Sicily and the Italian mainland, he exercised keen judgment and professional knowledge in organizing the supply depot as a unit of the operating base and in rendering vital and effective support to the participating units.

★ Capt. (then Cmdr.) Robert C. Bell, USN, San Francisco, Calif.: As officer in charge of ship repair forces at NOB, Oran, prior to and during the invasions of Sicily and the Italian mainland he effectively coordinated the functions of base facilities with local shops and floating dry docks controlled by Allied authorities. His thorough engineering knowledge and forceful leadership made possible the return of many ships to active combat.

★ Capt. Edmund E. Brady Jr., USN, Washington, D. C.: As naval attach© for air at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 14 Nov. 1941 to 28 Sept. 1942, he was tactful and effective in his diplomatic relations with Brazilian officials and obtained complete and whole-hearted cooperation between the Brazilian and U. S. armed forces, thereby contributing to the success of our operations against the enemy in the South Atlantic.

★ Capt. Grayson B. Carter, USN, San Diego, Calif.: As commander of a tractor group in South and Central Pacific waters during June and July 1944 he brought his tractor group to a high state of efficiency so that landings on an enemy-held island were made on schedule by a Marine division and the beaches quickly captured.

★ Capt. Charles J. Cater, USN, Anniston, Ala.: As aide and flag secretary from 3 February to 1 Oct. 1943, he rendered invaluable service in the preparation of orders and policies relative to the organization of the Atlantic Fleet for convoy escort and antisubmarine warfare. He also helped plan the Atlantic Fleet’s participation in the occupation of Morocco and Sicily.

★ Capt. William W. Drake, USNR, Los Angeles, Calif.: As public relations officer on the staff of CincPac from 31 December 1941 to 3 October 1944, he facilitated the accurate and expeditious flow of important war news to the American press. He disregarded his personal safety to participate actively in the campaigns against the Marshalls, Gilberts, Marianas and Palaus.

★ Capt. Rae B. Hall, USCG, Norfolk, Va.: As captain of the port of Norfolk, Va., from 10 March 1942 to 1 November 1943, he directed the training and equipping of a port security organization. He succeeded in developing a superbly trained group which provided such effective protection that ships and vital harbor installations in this area sustained no serious damage or loss during this period.

★ Capt. Colin D. Headlee, USN, Kennebunk Port, Me.: As commanding officer of the repair shin USS Delta during the invasions of Sicily and Italy he directed the repairing of ships and landing craft with skill and untiring energy. By his excellent organizing ability and untiring energy he enabled his command to carry out these highly important tasks with the utmost speed and efficiency.

★ Capt. Frank D. Higbee, USCG, Portland, Ore.: As commander of a group of LSTs during amphibious assaults along the northern rim of New Guinea, he displayed seamanship and leadership of the highest order. His services contributed materially to the successful conclusion of operations at Hollandia, Wakde, Biak, Noemfoor and Cape Sansapor.

★ Capt. William B. Jackson Jr., USN, Arlington. Va.: As chief of staff to Commander Service Squadrons, South Pacific Force, from 7 Jan. 1943 to 17 March 1944, during a period of intensive activity he planned skillfully and with marked foresight toward the sustained maintenance of our surface forces and advanced naval bases.

★ Capt. Charles R. Johnson, (CEC) USN, Baltimore, Md.: As public works officer at the U. S. Naval Base in Iceland from 16 Feb. 1942 to 8 Sept. 1943, he supervised the construction of engineering projects of vital military necessity in the Iceland area. By efficient utilization of all facilities, he completed two large airfields and one tank farm in the minimum time and at the smallest cost.

★ Capt. John B. Mallard, USN, Annapolis, Md.: As commander of a task group of LSTs during the assaults on Lae and Finschhafen, he organized and led succeeding echelons of resupply to both of these landing points on New Guinea. He was responsible for the prompt execution of assignments by his task force which contributed materially to the success of our operations in this area.

★ Capt. (then Comdr.) William L. Messmer, USN, Detroit, Mich.: As commander of a minesweeping unit during the invasion of Italy he successfully executed the hazardous operations of sweeping enemy minefields in the Gulf of Salerno, enabling assault boat waves to disembark troops, equipment and supplies expeditiously and according to schedule.

★ Capt. Charles J. Moore, USN, Washington, D. C.: As chief of staff to the Commander 5th Fleet from August 1943 to September 1944, he supervised the planning and execution of operations against the Japanese in the Gilbert, Marshall, and Marianas Islands. He contributed in large measure to the capture of these vital positions and the decisive defeat of enemy fleet units in the Battle of the Philippine Sea.

★ Capt. Edmund M. Ragsdale, USN, Piedmont, Calif.: As repair officer at our Casablanca and Palermo naval operating bases, he planned and supervised temporary repairs to the badly damaged USS Hambleton with extremely limited facilities. He perfected methods of fitting out landing ships for side stowage and of launching pontoon causeways to facilitate unloading on beaches, and also operated a captured shipyard for the maintenance of vital advance naval units.

★ Capt. (then Comdr.) Alfred H. Richards, USN, Columbus, Ohio: As commander of a sweeper group during the invasion of Italy, he successfully swept the approach channel and transport area for the passage of vessels of a major task force. The ships under his command then swept additional channels to the beaches for transports, landing craft and fire-support groups despite the constant danger from hostile mines and aircraft.

★ Capt. Myron T. Richardson, USN. Auburndale, Mass.: As plans and operations officer on the staff of a naval task force commander during the invasion of southern France, he exhibited skill and energy in developing sound and comprehensive plans for the assault. His later services as senior naval liaison officer with the U. S. 7th Army were invaluable in maintaining close communications with its rapidly moving headquarters.

★ Capt. Harry Sanders, USN, Newport, R. I.: By his inspiring leadership and expert tactical ability as commander of an antisubmarine attack group, he contributed materially to the defense of Allied shipping and the successful prosecution of the war in a highly strategic area.

★ Capt. Charles Schaaf, (SC) USN, New London, Conn.: As supply officer in charge of the Naval Supply Depot, Milne Bay, New Guinea, he reorganized the activity, developed proper stowage facilities and completed an inventory and card index of all supplies, thereby creating a smoothly operating organization of infinite value to our operations against the enemy in the Southwest Pacific area.

★ Capt. James W. Whitfield, USN, Wilmington, Del.: As commanding officer of the Amphibious Training Base, Camp Bradford, Va., from March 1943 until October 1944 he organized, equipped and efficiently operated facilities for the training of Army combat teams and naval landing craft crews of all types and of joint amphibious training schools. He was responsible in large measure for the high state of readiness of these troops and units in the assaults on Sicily, Salerno and in the Pacific.

★ Capt. John M. Will, USN, Perth Amboy, N. J.: As a materiel officer he carried out his many and varied duties with keen foresight, sound judgment and untiring perseverance. He coordinated overhaul facilities, procured and allotted materiel, trained personnel and planned and directed submarine operations throughout a prolonged period of time.

★ Cmdr. Joseph E. Ederer, USNR, Portland, Ore.: As engineer officer of the US8 Biscayne during the invasions of Sicily and Italy he exercised superior technical skill and brilliant initiative throughout this perilous period. Despite innumerable fierce enemy aerial attacks he steadfastly carried out his vital assignment, insuring the efficient functioning of essential landing craft, smoke generating devices and other equipment.

★ Cmdr. (then Lt. Cmdr). Robert R. Helen, USNR, San Francisco, Calif.: As salvage officer during the invasion of Sicily he skillfully and efficiently supervised the clearance of wreckage left by the enemy. When a U. S. warship was brought into the harbor in a sinking condition he continued to direct the operations of a salvage party despite repeated enemy air attacks.

★ Cmdr. Robert W. Mackert, USN, Peoria, Ill. (posthumously): As chief staff officer to the atoll commander in the Marshall Islands area from 31 Jan. to 23 June 1944, he assisted in the initial planning: and rapid construction of major airfields immediately after our troops landed at Majuro and Eniwetok. He also served as coordinator of our day and night raids against Ponape and Truk and, in two instances, was largely responsible for the rescue of bomber crews brought down at sea.

★ Cmdr. Kalph S. Moore, USNR, Montecito, Calif.: As commander of a group of ships engaged in operations for the capture of enemy-held islands from 15 June 1944 to 12 August 1944 he caused his vessels to operate in dangerous and poorly charted waters to chart and clear them of mines. In addition, he directed most successfully the employment of his vessels in inshore patrolling thus contributing materially to the success of the operation.

★ Cmdr. John S. Mosher, USNR, Princeton, N. J.: Serving with an amphibious force in the Pacific from its inception until June 1944, he obtained information from aerial photographs and supervised the preparation of maps and charts on the New Guinea area. His compilation of data for each operation contributed materially to the success of these operations.

★ Cmdr. George W. Pressey, USN, Hampton, Va.: Serving on the staff of Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet, from 81 December 1942 to 18 September 1943, he contributed materially to the development of antisubmarine weapons and tactics and to the establishment of a sound escort-of-convoy doctrine. He also aided in the planning for the participation of the Atlantic Fleet in the invasion of Africa and Sicily.

★ Cmdr. John W. Schmidt, USN, Buffalo, N. Y.: As commanding officer of the USS Gherardi during the Sicilian campaign, he skillfully directed shore bombardments and conducted nightly sweeps in the face of strong enemy air opposition to prevent the evacuation or hostile forces by sea. On the night of 3-4 August, his ship intercepted an enemy convoy and sank an F-lighter.

★ Cmdr. Richard M. Scruggs, USN, Madison, Fla.: As commander of a task unit of LSTs during the attacks on Lae and Finschhafen, he organized and led echelons of resupply to both these landing points on New Guinea without loss or damage to a single unit.

★ Cmdr. Edgar E. Stebbins, USN, Dallas, Tex.: As commander of a bombing squadron attached to the USS Yorktown from 19 November to 4 December 1943, he led his squadron in two brilliantly executed attacks against ground installations on Mille and Makin Islands. Later, as acting commander of an air group, he hurled the full strength of his unit against Japanese aircraft, ground installations and shipping and inflicted devastating losses.

★ Cmdr. William H. Standley Jr. USN, San Pedro, Calif.: As training officer on the staff of Commander Landing Craft and Bases, Amphibious Force, Northwest African Waters, during the invasion of Italy he prepared the landing attack plan and indoctrinated personnel so that the assault forces landed exactly on schedule at the beaches of Salerno despite continuous attacks by enemy aircraft.

★ Cmdr. (then Lt. Comdr.) James E. Walsh, USNR; Queens Village, N. Y.: As commanding officer of a beach battalion during the invasion of Italy he landed with the first wave and, although under constant enemy gunfire, daringly directed the beaching and retracting of landing craft at the beachhead for the follow-up convoys.

★ Cmdr. James S. Willis, USN, Charleston, W. Va.: As commander of a task group during the attacks an Lae and Finschhafen he conducted successful landings of initial assault waves without the loss of a craft or damage to a single ship. He also led his task group in an effective bombardment of Japanese positions on New Guinea.

★ Lt. Cmdr. Eugene P. Harris, (MC) USN, Houston, Tex.: As a medical officer attached to the 11th Amphibious Force during the invasion of Normandy, he was charged with the formation of the medical plan of this command and its application to the coast of France. His excellent planning and competent personal supervision of the evacuation of casualties from assault beaches contributed greatly to the operation.

★ Lt. Cmdr. Eugene P. Rankin, USN, Sapulpa, Okla.: As commander of a patrol squadron operating in the Solomons and Bismarck Archipelago areas from 25 November 1943 to 15 June 1944, he coordinated a system of attacks with surface craft which resulted in the annihilation of the Japanese barge fleet in the northern Solomons and New Ireland areas. His thorough training program was responsible in a large part for the success of his squadron in completing 1,777 night and day combat missions without loss of aircraft or personnel.

★ Lt. Cmdr. Attilio A. Vischio, USNR, Brooklyn, N. Y.: As commanding: officer of the USS Areturus during; the invasion of Italy he fought his vessel ably and efficiently during repeated heavy bombing attacks and brought her through without serious casualties to his command.

★ Lt. Cmdr. Carver G. Walcott, (MC) USNR, Fenton, Mich.: While serving as medical officer aboard the uss Biscayne during the invasion of Italy he skillfully treated survivors of nearby stricken vessels despite the danger imposed by devasting enemy bombing attacks. By his competent handling of a difficult task for a long period of time with limited facilities he contributed to the saving of many lives.

★ Lt. Cmdr. Sherman B. Wetmore, USNR, Galveston, Tex.: As commanding officer of the uss Pilot during the invasion of Italy he displayed expert seamanship under extremely hazardous condions, In spite of navigational difficulties and the extreme danger of drifting mines, he successfully accomplished his dangerous missions, thereby enabling our ships to support effectively the assault forces in establishing their initial beachhead.

★ Lt. Louis G. Johnson, USNR, Atlanta, Ga,:, As commanding officer of the USS LCT4(5) 125 during the invasion of Italy he skillfully beached his ship and, despite heavy enemy fire, drove and pushed off his tanks and equipment, retracting and beaching at new points five times within an hour in order to confuse the enemy.

★ Lt. John T. Manry III, USNR, Houston, Tex.: When attached to the USS Biscayne during the invasion of Italy he unhesitatingly led a firefighting party aboard a merchant ship which had been struck by an enemy bomb and set afire. Despite the peril of imminent explosions, he courageously directed the fire-fighting operations, eventually succeeding in controlling the flames.

★ Lt. Robert G. Osborne, USNE, Knoxville, Tenn.: Charged with the task of assisting in planning the gunfire support of landing operations during the invasion of Italy, he was largely responsible for the thorough training and indoctrination of the communication components of shore fire-control parties. He succeeded in reestablishing communications affecting the control of naval gunfire at a time when our forces were seriously threatened by enemy counterattacks.

★ Lt. Lessley G. Pinkerton, USNR, Bartlesville, Okla.: As naval gunfire liaison officer of the 36th U. S. Infantry Division during the invasion of Italy he directed accurate and timely shore bombardments with courageous initiative and untiring effort, repulsing numerous enemy counterattacks and destroying important hostile targets prior to the landing of sufficient field artillery reinforcements.

★ Lt. Clyde A. Scheidemantel Jr., USNR, Harmony, Pa.: When his landing craft was hit by an enemy shell during the invasion of Sicily rendering the port propeller inoperative, he skillfully directed temporary repairs. He succeeded in maintaining power for main propulsion, enabling his craft to return to her base despite fierce aerial and shelling attacks.

★ Lt. (jg) Joseph V. Amendolara, USNR, Youngstown, Ohio: As naval gunfire liaison officer attached to the 2Dth Division artillery during the invasion of Normandy, he effected the reorganization of shore fire-control parties at a time when enemy gunfire had caused severe casualties to equipment and personnel. When the LST on which he was embarked was prevented from beaching by hostile gunfire, he commandeered an LCVP and made his way ashore where he made possible the directing of naval gunfire in support of the troops on the beachhead.

★ Lt. (jg) Frank W. Laeasle, USNR, Moorestown, N. J.: When fierce enemy bombing attacks left our shipping badly damaged and burning during the invasion of Italy, he assumed charge of all salvage operations and skillfully supervised the fire fighting and repair work aboard the damaged vessels. Later, he labored tirelessly to assist in the removal of numerous sunken vessels in the port of Naples so that our ships were able to use the harbor.

★ Gunner Robert P. Burr, USNR, Pontiac, Mich, (posthumously): For outstanding courage and meritorious service, the nature of which cannot be revealed at this time.

★ George I. Mantere, CGM, USN, Newport, R. I.: As the leading petty officer to survive the sinking of the USS Juneau, he swam to a floating net, unrolled it and paddled around rescuing other survivors. He unselfishly watched over the wounded for three days until, unable to sit or lie down without pain, he transferred to a raft to help paddle toward shore. With many of the wounded swimming away or dying, the only surviving officer ill and the raft constantly circled by sharks he heroically continued his efforts to reach shore until the fifth day when planes appeared overhead and promised early rescue.

Gold Star in Lieu of Second Silver Star Medal

★ Cmdr. Richard C. Lake, USN, Ligonier, Ind.: As commanding officer of a submarine during its second war patrol, he launched a deadly torpedo attack which resulted in the destruction of an escorted Japanese light cruiser.

★ Cmdr. George G. Palmer, USN, Charleston, S. C.: As commanding officer of the USS Harding during the assault on Normandy, he maneuvered his ship in under the blasting from enemy coastal defenses and withering machine-gun fire, enabling his main battery to deliver a heavy volume of close-support fire. The Harding's guns silenced German guns firing on our disembarked troops on the beaches and on landing craft carrying our invasion forces.

★ Lt. Jack R. Crutchfield, USN, White Horse Beach, Mass, (posthumously) : As diving, engineer and electrical officer aboard a submarine during her fourth, fifth and sixth war patrols, he maintained equipment in a high state of efficiency. His exceptional skill and courage contributed to the achievement of his ship in sinking seven Japanese vessels, including two destroyers, and in damaging two other ships.

★ Lt. John H. Eichmann, USN, Boise, Idaho (posthumously): As navigator and executive officer aboard a submarine during her fifth and sixth patrols in the Pacific, he rendered invaluable service to his commanding officer in attacks on enemy surface forces and contributed essentially to the sinking of five Japanese ships.

Silver Star Medal

★ Capt. Jesse H. Carter, USN, Texarkana, Ark.: Commanding a destroyer squadron which was supporting amphibious operations against New Guinea, he kept up a withering barrage of antiaircraft fire which destroyed numerous Jap bombers and torpedo planes. His skillful maneuvering prevented serious damage to our units and inflicted disastrous losses upon the enemy. His thorough indoctrination of the men under his command contributed materially to our capture of Lae and Finschhafen.

★ Capt. (then Cmdr.) Henry E. Eccles, USN, Flushing, N. Y.; Capt. (then Lt. Comdr.) John J. Hourihan, USN, Miami Fla., and Cmdr. (then Lt. Cmdr.) Jacob E. Cooper, USN, Brooklyn, N. Y.: As COs of destroyers during the Battle of the Java Sea, they went in boldly in the face of severe enemy fire to deliver a successful torpedo attack in two stages against the Japanese cruisers. This forced them to break off the attack and enabled the Allied ships to regain their battle formation.

★ Capt. (then Cmdr.) William D. Wright Jr., USN, Knoxville, Tenn.: As deputy commander of an assault group during the invasion of Normandy he remained under fire during the bitterest part of the assault, reorganizing and disposing his craft for maximum effectiveness and dispatching them to the beach. Upon relieving the task group commander he was placed in general charge afloat of the unloading of ferry craft and, by his organizational ability, tireless effort and experience, rapidly cleared the backlog of ships.

★ Cmdr. Eugene C. Carusi, USNR, Washington, D. C.: As commander of the 6th Beach Battalion during the invasion of France he landed during the first stage of the assault when the fighting was severe and imposed an effective order on the beaches under his command at an early hour. His courage was equaled by his tireless devotion to duty in maintaining an efficient traffic to and from the beach.

★ Cmdr. Glynn R. Donaho, USN, Normangee, Tex.: As commanding officer of a submarine during prolonged undersea operations in perilous hostile waters of the Pacific he pressed home relentless attacks with cool courage and outstanding ability, sinking an important amount of Japanese shipping.

★ Cmdr. Lawrence C. Leever, USNR, Ann Arbor, Mich.: Commanding the 7th Beach Battalion during the invasion of Normandy, he landed at the first stage of the assault when the fighting was most severe. Through his leadership and courage, he was able to maintain an efficient traffic to and from the beach.

★ Cmdr. Harry H. Mclllhenny, USN, Washington, N. C.; Cmdr. (then Lt. Cmdr.) James T. Smith, USN, Fayetteville, Tenn.; Cmdr. (then Lt. Cmdr.) Robert A. Theobald Jr., USN, Scarsdale, N. Y., and Cmdr. James H. Ward, USN, San Francisco, Calif.: As commanding officers of destroyers in a task group returning from Finschhafen, New Guinea in September 1943, they were suddenly attacked by a formation of 10 Japanese torpedo bombers. They skillfully maneuvered clear of enemy torpedoes, inflicted severe losses on the Japanese, and brought their ships and convoy safely through the encounter with only slight damage from machine-gun fire.

★ Cmdr. Byron H. Nowell, USN, Salt Lake City, Utah: As commanding officer of a submarine during its third war patrol, he made a series of aggressive attacks against a strongly escorted convoy and succeeded in sinking a Hatsuharu-class destroyer and a freighter, and in damaging a tanker.

★ Cmdr. George G. Palmer, USN, Charleston, S. C.: As commanding officer of the USS Harding during the invasion of southern France, he led his ship into action with three other destroyers against five enemy E-boats that were attempting to break through and attack valuable shipping anchored inshore. He sank two of the enemy craft and recovered 12 prisoners, including the two captains.

★ Cmdr. Edgar E. Stebbins, USN, Dallas, Tex.: Under his brilliant leadership as commander of a carrier- based air group in action at Truk, Saipan, Tinian, Palau, and Woleai Islands, he and his pilots destroyed 135 enemy planes, sank, or damaged an important amount of Japanese shipping and effectively bombed vital ground installations. He personally accounted for two hostile aircraft and served as target observer on three occasions, remaining over the target area several hours each day to provide the task force commander with accurate information.

★ Lt. Cmdr. Edward P. Madley, USN, Coronado, Calif.: As assistant approach officer of a submarine, he displayed judgment and resourcefulness which were of great assistance to his commanding officer during attacks which resulted in the sinking or damaging of many thousands of tons of enemy shipping.

★ Lt. Cmdr. James G. Reid, USNR, Knoxville, Tenn.: As a beachmaster during the assault on Normandy, he organized and operated two beaches, working under intense enemy fire. Working with limited personnel and equipment, he successfully operated both beaches for several hours until additional personnel reached him.

★ Lt. Roy E. Butler, USN, Cambridge, Mass.: While in command of the LST 3 during the invasion of Sicily, he beached his ship at San Stefano and was disembarking assault troops and unloading supplies when enemy aircraft scored a direct hit on his vessel, causing severe damage and many casualties. Throughout the following seven days he and his men worked tirelessly to save their ship and finally assured her eventual salvage.

★ Lt. William T. Cogley, USNR, Brooklyn, N. Y.: While serving as a naval gunfire liaison officer during the invasion of Sicily he assisted in the control of shore bombardment in support of the 3d Infantry Division and by initiative and thorough knowledge of naval gunfire contributed materially to the rapid advance of the 7th Army along the north coast of Sicily.

★ Lt. John W. Detwiler, USNR, Grosse Pointe, Mich.: As commanding officer of the USS LCI(L) 220 during the amphibious assault on Sicily when an enemy shell-burst made it impossible to retract the vessel from the uncharted sand bar on which she was grounded, he skillfully ran his craft across the sand bar and in the face of persistent shellfire and dive-bombing attacks, landed the embarked troops on the assigned beach.

★ Lt. Walter G. Epply, (MC) USNR, Manchester, N. H. (posthumously): As officer-in-charge of a medical section of a beach party during the assault on Guam, he landed under heavy mortar and shell fire and directed the establishment of his medical station. He exposed himself continuously to terrific hostile fire while rendering aid to the many casualties on the beach. He was killed while administering plasma to a wounded marine whose life was saved as a result of the prompt and vital treatment.

★ Lt. James W. Foristel, USNR, St. Louis, Mo.: As commanding officer of a sub chaser near Arawa on 15 December 1943, he took his ship within range of a Japanese shore battery to carry out hazardous rescue operations at sea which resulted in the saving of many of our wounded. Later in the day, when attacked by six enemy fighters, he maneuvered his ship to avoid damage, at the same time shooting down one plane and forcing the others to retire (November 1944 Information Bulletin, p. 12).

★ Lt. Lyman B. Fox, USNR, Sikeston, Mo.: As a beachmaster during the invasion of Normandy, he survived the sinking of a landing craft, but was wounded in the hand and chest and buried in a rock slide. On three or more occasions he refused evacuation as a casualty in order to remain with his men and direct the organization of his beach. Largely due to his efforts, his beach was opened to traffic early on 7 June.

★ Lt. Paul H. Koren, (MC) USNR, Scarsdale, N. Y.: As medical officer of a beach battalion during the invasion of France, he landed on the beach at H-hour-plus-32-minutes and unhesitatingly took his station at the water’s edge. At the constant risk of his life he exposed himself to terrific German machine-gun, rifle, and artillery fire to minister to the wounded.

★ Lt. Charles S. Potter, USNR, Washington, D. C.: While serving as a beachmaster during the landing behind enemy lines at Terranova, Sicily, 8 Aug. 1943, he volunteered to go ashore in darkness with the assault waves. He daringly crossed the beach under fire, and although the area was believed to be mined, courageously marked its exits and limits for subsequent waves.

★ Lt. Wesley C. Vines, USNR, Avondale Estates, Ga.: As dispatching officer for the assault boat waves during the invasion of Salerno, Italy, he courageously assumed his post in an exposed position on the top deck of the PC 559 and, in the face of severe, continuous fire from enemy shore batteries, skillfully directed the assembling and launching of assault craft for eight hours.

★ Lt. Griffon C. Wakefield, USNR, Norfolk, Va.: As a naval gunfire liaison officer during the invasion of Normandy, he assumed the duties of spotter and battalion artillery liaison officer when these two officers were wounded. His able conduct of naval gunfire aided materially in the final capture of Montebourg.

★ Lt. (jg) Roy F. Beery Jr., USNR, Houston, Tex.: As naval gunfire liaison officer attached to the 16th Regimental Combat Team, 1st U. S. Infantry Division, during the assault on Normandy, he landed under intense fire and went forward with the assault troops with little regard for his personal safety. He directed naval gunfire on enemy installations with great skill and accuracy, thereby contributing valuable support to Allied troops in the capture of Surain.

★ Lt. (jg) Bennie Berger, USNR, Chicago, Ill.: As naval gunfire liaison officer during the assault on Normandy, he landed in the initial waves under extremely heavy enemy fire and directed cruiser fire in support of the 5th Ranger Battalion. Finding no officer with the 2nd Ranger Battalion fire control party, he took charge of both parties and organized successful communications.

★ Lt. (jg) Lester B. Billheimer, USNR, Oak Park, Ill.: As commanding officer of the LCI (L) 188 during the invasion of Sicily, when his ship struck a sand bar while approaching the beach, he skillfully maneuvered her clear of the obstruction under heavy enemy gunfire and landed the troops on the designated beaches. During the invasion of Italy, he again beached his craft in record time to unload urgently needed men and supplies.

★ Lt. (jg) Phil H. Bucklew, USNR, Ashville, Ohio: As scout boat officer during the invasion of Italy, he embarked in a small kayak under cover of darkness and located a prearranged landing beach. In the face of intense enemy fire, he directed our attack forces to their proper landing point and maintained his exposed position until the mission had been completed.

★ Lt. (jg) Russell E. Carrico, USN, Davenport, Iowa (missing in action): Serving aboard a submarine in the Pacific, he ably assisted his commanding officer in delivering torpedo and gun attacks against enemy shipping, which resulted in the sinking and damaging of considerable tonnage. He fearlessly led a party from his sib aboard a Japanese freighter and captured the crew.

★ Lt. (jg) Coit M. Coker, USNR, Chapel Hill, N. C.: As a naval gunfire liaison officer during the invasion of France and the advance inland from 6 to 15 June 1944 he displayed marked bravery and knowledge in calling for and adjusting fire which aided materially in the advance on and capture of Grandcamp les Bains and Isigny.

★ Lt. (jg) Rumsey Ewing, USNR, St. Louis, Mo.: As commanding officer of a PT-boat along the north coast of New Guinea from September to December 1943, he carried out 30 offensive patrols against Japanese barge traffic and succeeded in sinking an enemy lugger and nine boats. When a PT-boat went aground in hostile territory off Vincke Point on the night of 2 October, he rescued the crew without casualty despite terrific fire from approximately 100 Japanese troops on shore.

★ Lt. (jg) John E. Goodrich, USNR, Oneonta, N. Y. (missing in action): As assistant to the officer in charge of the combat information center aboard the USS Reid while that vessel was serving as air guard ship for a group of six destroyers supporting the landing at Finschhafen, he plotted and evaluated the positions of 60 attacking enemy planes so accurately that the bombing attacks were evaded and the ships were brought through without material damage.

★ Lt. (jg) Edward Kahan, USNR, Hazelton, Pa.: As a boat wave commander attached to the USS Lyon during the invasion of Italy he coolly and courageously directed the landing craft to the proper beaches under heavy gunfire. He maintained radio communication with the transport commander and kept salvage parties advised of the situation on the beaches.

★ Lt. (jg) Louis Kalmar, USNR, Osage, W. Va.: As naval gunfire liaison officer with the 4th Infantry Division during the assault on Normandy, he directed fire on the coastal battery at Crisbecq, assisting materially in its capture. When his spotter was wounded, he took over his duties and continued to direct naval gunfire in the final assault on Cherbourg.

★ Lt (jg) George E. Loria, USNR, Detroit, Mich.: While attached to the USS Lyon during the invasion of Sicily he coolly and courageously carried out his perilous duties as traffic control officer. While under frequent bombing attacks by hostile aircraft he maintained radio communication with the transport commander and kept salvage parties accurately advised of the situation on the beaches.

★ Lt. (jg) Everett W. Pease, USNR, Sutter, Calif.: Acting as naval gunfire liaison officer with an infantry division during the invasion of Normandy, he took charge of an infantry unit and by his example of courage led them forward. The naval gunfire which he directed assisted materially in the capture of Cherbourg.

★ Lt. (jg) William D. Seidler, USNR, Montclair, N. J.: As boat officer of a support boat attached to the USS Thomas Jefferson during the invasion of Italy he skillfully escorted the first three waves of landing craft to their assigned positions, protecting them from the heavy defense fire of the enemy by furnishing accurate and destructive fire support. By his extreme bravery under the shattering hostile guns, he greatly assisted in the safe landing of the assault boats.

★ Lt. (jg) Ransom A. Teeter Jr., USNR, McGehee, Ark.: As commander of the first wave of landing craft attached to the USS James O'Hara during the invasion of Salerno, he effectively directed the retraction of all craft and supervised the expeditious unloading of cargo in support of our forces. He successfully completed his mission with a minimum of losses.

★ Ens. Gene M. Benedetti, USNR, Petaluma, Calif.: As officer-in-charge of an LCT which was a part of the spearhead of the invasion of Normandy, he pressed home his attack relentlessly. When the rudder cable broke about 2,000 yards off the beach, he righted his craft and landed under heavy fire which killed two men who were trying to lower the ramp so that the tanks could disembark. He then led a party of men to replace those killed and succeeded in retracting his craft with the ramp down.

★ Ens. Fred J. Cannastra, USNR, Schenectady, N. Y.: As a naval gunfire liaison officer during the assault on France, he took over the duties of gunfire spotter when this officer was killed, in addition to his own. Under heavy fire he conducted naval gunfire support to assist the advancing infantry and materially assisted in the capture of Montebourg.

★ Ens. (then CSM) Edward W. Epps, USN, Prince George, Va.: While attached to the SC 039 en route to Salerno, Italy, on 8 Sept. 1943, he manned a 50-mm. gun during a surprise attack by 10 enemy fighter-bombers and shot down one of the planes.

★ Ens. (then CSM) Edward W. Epps, USN, Prince George, Va.: While attached to the SC 639 en route to Salerno, Italy, on 8 Sept. 1943, he manned a 50-mm. gun during a surprise attack by 10 enemy fighter-bombers and shot down one of the planes.

★ Ens. Eugene A. Fehlig, USNR, St. Louis, Mo.: While attached to the 116th Regimental Combat Team as naval gunfire liaison officer during the assault on France, he was desperately wounded as he reached the beach. However, he crawled out under enemy fire to drag a wounded comrade back to comparative safety and was wounded twice more during the rescue.

★ Ens. Robert B. Gilfert, USNR, Erie, Pa.: As commanding officer of the LCT (6) 540 during the invasion of Normandy, he landed his craft against heavy enemy gunfire and discharged his tanks, then reported for his second responsibility—the receiving and transportation of assault vehicles to the assault beach. Although several of his small crew lay dead, his ship badly holed by enemy gunfire and the unloading equipment damaged, he proceeded with his task without question.

★ Ens. John J. Vogel, USN, Thiells, N. Y.: In charge of a salvage party from the USS Lyon during the invasion of Italy he coolly and efficiently directed his men in clearing the assault beaches of numerous broached and damaged landing craft in order to expedite the steady flow of essential Army supplies.

★ John A. Jacobson, CBM, USNR, Oakland, Calif, (posthumously): As chief petty officer of a naval combat demolition unit during the invasion of Normandy, he was assigned the perilous mission of landing on the Omaha beach at a given moment and blowing a 50-yard gap in enemy-placed obstacles. Although the task appeared impossible due to intense German artillery and rifle fire, he attempted to place the main firing ring around the enemy obstructions. He was killed before he could complete his task, but the surviving members of his crew completed the mission.

★ A. C. Maguire, MM1c, USNR, Hoboken, N. J.: As a member of Naval Combat Demolition Unit No. 128 he landed during the invasion of France at H-hour plus-one and in the face of heavy enemy artillery and small arms fire was separated from his officer and crew. Instead of seeking cover, he succeeded in laying charges and blowing a gap of 25 yards width in enemy beach obstacles before high tide made further work impossible.

★ James W. Chandler, GM2c, USN, Denton, Tex. (posthumously): Attached to the LST 289 when she was attacked off the coast of England by German E-boats in April 1944, he was stationed at the fog generator of the fantail. By his timely warning and courage in the face of grave peril, he saved the lives of many shipmates.

★ Edgar P. Lesperance, EM2c, USNR, Milwaukee, WI.: When his ship, the USS Skill, was sunk in the Gulf of Salerno he remained at his station in the after-engine room and immediately went to the assistance of an unconscious man, carrying him up the ladder to safety. He then entered a flaming compartment to rescue another shipmate and, throughout the remaining period of time, rendered all possible aid to others, contributing materially to the probable saving of many lives.

★ Thomas J. O’Malley, EM2c, USNR, Dorchester, Mass.: Attached to the LCT(5) 125 during the invasion of Salerno, Italy, he courageously drove vehicles to the assault beach under withering enemy gunfire. He returned to the ship to repeat the operation while the craft retracted and made five separate beachings in order to evade devasting enemy shellfire.

★ Milton P. Weatherford, GM2c, USNR, Salisbury, N. C. (posthumously): As a member of a naval combat demolition unit during the assault on Normandy, he landed on the beach at the appointed hour. While attempting to blow a 50-yard gap in beach obstacles under intense artillery and rifle fire, he was killed before completing his task.

★ Desmond P. Fitzgerald, EM3c, USNR Springfield, Mass., and Burd J. Kaufman, GM3c, USN, Gordon, Pa.: When the ramp of the LCT(5) 221 became imbedded in deep sand during the landing at Salerno, Italy, they were undeterred by machine-gun fire and, despite painful wounds, continued to assist in extricating the vehicles until everyone had been placed ashore. Their grim determination contributed materially to the success of the invasion.

★ Henry R. Beausoleil, S1c, USNR, Nashua, N. H.: While serving aboard the USS Skill when that vessel was sunk off the Gulf of Salerno he was thrown overboard by the force of the initial explosion but, despite the fires which raged on the stricken vessel, immediately returned aboard. Fearlessly entering the forward engine room, he helped several critically injured men to abandon ship, continuing his efforts until a few moments before the Skill capsized and sank.

★ James H. Blackman, S1c, USN, Princeton, N. C. (posthumously): Attached to an LCT during the invasion of Normandy, he and two shipmates volunteered to go over the bow in the face of almost certain hostile fire and test the depth of the water in order to insure the safe disembarking of Army personnel and vehicles. As the ramp of the vessel was lowered, he lost his life in a valiant effort to carry out the mission.

Gold Star in Lieu of Second Distinguished Flying Cross

★ Lt. Cmdr. Rolla S. Lemmon, USN, Long Beach, Calif, (missing in action): As executive officer of a carrier-based fighter squadron near the Kazan Islands, he led a small formation of fighters against a numerically superior force of enemy bombers attempting to close in on one of our task groups. He accounted for one of the seven planes destroyed by his formation before he himself was forced down.

★ Lt. Merl W. Davenport, USNR, Detroit, Mich.: As division leader of a fighter squadron operating in the Solomon Islands and the Bismark Archipelago from 26 January to 7 March 1944 ne took part in 31 combat missions over Japanese territory. His superior airmanship and excellent teamwork contributed materially to the success of these missions.

★ Lt. Mayo A. Hadden Jr., USNR, Holland, Mich.: While participating in a fighter sweep over the Japanese base at Saipan on 22 February 1944, he was ordered to cover other planes of his flight and many enemy fighters were encountered, eight of which were shot down. He personally shot down three enemy fighters in flames.

Distinguished Flying Cross

★ Lt. Cmdr. Richard M. Swenson, USN, Kansas City, Mo. (missing in action): As a pilot of Torpedo Squadron 24 attached to an aircraft carrier he led numerous vital bombing strikes against enemy shipping, airfields and installations. In support of landing operations at Hollandia he pressed home powerful attacks in the face of persistent antiaircraft fire, accurately releasing his bombs at perilously low altitudes.

★ Lt. John M. Armitage, USNR, Fairfax, Calif, (posthumously): Among the first to volunteer for tests in the development of aircraft rockets, he repeatedly risked his life to make hazardous experimental flights in various types of planes carrying rocket ammunition. He was killed at the Naval Ordnance Test Station, Inyokern, Calif., on 21 August 1944 while testing an early development of the Navy’s largest aircraft rocket.

★ Lt. Hulon R. Blakeney, USN, Warrington, Fla.: As patrol plane commander of a Ventura he volunteered with his crew7 to make daylight photo-reconnaissance flights to the northern Kurils. On 29 May 1944, with full realization of the danger involved, and without escort, he made his first daylight sortie over Paramushiru and Shimushu. On 31 May he made a second unescorted daylight sortie and on this occasion was successful in obtaining excellent photographs of hitherto undiscovered and important installations.

★ Lt. Robert R. Butler, USNR, Oakland, Calif, (missing in action): Leading a fighter sweep over Iwo Jima, he attacked two groups of intercepting aircraft and, despite the hazards of a low ceiling, personally accounted for three of the 33 planes destroyed by his flight. In a fighter-bomber mission over the same area later, he assisted in destroying 33 Jap fighters in combat and approximately 40 on the ground.

★ Lt. James G. Leonard, USNR, Island City, Ore. (missing in action): As a fighter pilot attached to a bombing squadron in the central and Southwest Pacific from January to June 1944 he was gallant and daring in many combat missions against hostile shipping, supply dumps and gun positions. He attacked a large cargo ship in Tanapag harbor, Saipan, and, diving low, bombed the vessel accurately and skillfully, contributing materially to her final destruction.

★ Lt. Niles R. Siebert, USNR, Canada, Kans. (posthumously): Acting as flight leader during a strike against a Japanese airfield in the vicinity of the Marianas on 24 June 1944, he flew in boldly in the face of intense and accurate antiaircraft fire to bomb assigned targets. He fiercely pressed home his attacks, destroying a runway and numerous installations.

★ Lt. Paul Sorenson, USNR, Muskegon, Mich.: As pilot of a fighter plane in action against a German submarine in the Atlantic during March 1944 he pressed home two vigorous strafing runs in the face of intense antiaircraft fire, silenced the enemy deck guns, de­molished the periscope and started fires and explosions of ready ammuni­tion. Subsequent appearance of an oil slick enabled our forces to locate and destroy the submarine the next day.

★ Lt. Ernest W. Wood, USNR, Sac­ramento, Calif.: As a pilot of Torpedo Squadron 24 attached to an aircraft carrier he made a single-handed at­tack on an enemy destroyer escort in Palau harbor^ scoring two direct hits which immediately sank the ship. Later, flying in support of the land­ings at Hollandia and in attacks on Truk and the Nomoi Islands he con­tributed materially to the damage in­flicted on grounded aircraft, service facilities and installations.

★ Lt., (jg) Carl Burkhardt, USN, Coronado, Calif, (posthumously): Fly­ing his patrol plane through darkness and heavy rain, he established contact with a Japanese submarine and launched a vigorous and daring at­tack, which resulted in probable dam­age to the enemy craft.

★ Lt., (jg) Conrad Elliott, USNR, Houston, Tex. (missing in action): As pilot of a carrier-based fighter plane in action against enemy forces in the Marianas he pressed home an accu­rate, powerful bombing and strafing attack on a valuable enemy convoy, scoring a near miss on a cargo ship and setting a destroyer on fire. When his small flight engaged a numerically superior force over Iwo Jima he personally accounted for one of 17 Jap­anese planes destroyed by his formation.

★ Lt. (jg) Grover C. Hannever, USNR, Providence, R. I.; Ens. Eugene L. Coupe, USNR, Nebraska City, Neb.; Ens. Robert Tehan, USNR, St. Louis, Mo.; Howard C. Brandon, ACR, USN, Lithonia, Ga.; Clyde A. Smith, ACMM, USN, Harvard, Idaho; Gordon G. Merrick, AOM1c, USNR, Memphis, Mich.; John R. Van Horn, AMM1c, USNR, Niagara Falls, N. Y.; Donald W. Gardner, ARM2c, USNR, Howard, S. D., and Joseph Mihalsky, S1c, USN, Whiting, Ind. (all posthumously): While participating in a flight of a heavy bomber on a special antisubmarine mission they carried out their duties with expert skill and untiring effort, thereby assuring the eventual destruction of the enemy vessel.

★ Lt. (jg) Frank R. Hayde Jr., USNR, Kansas City, Mo. (missing in action): Directed to intercept a numerically superior force of enemy fighters during our invasion of the Marianas, he hurled his fighter plane into the midst of the Japanese formation and sent three Jap planes crashing into the sea.

★ Lt. (jg) Paul D. Searles, USNR, Portland, Oreg. (missing in action): As a technical observer in a carrier- based torpedo plane, he accompanied his squadron commander in the initial pre-dawn raid on Marcus Island and displayed brilliant technical skill in locating the target despite clouds, darkness, rain and fierce enemy opposition. His skill insured the success of the flight in starting fires among grounded aircraft which guided other planes in subsequent attacks.

★ Lt. (jg) Jack H. Wells, USNR, Lynden, Wash, (missing in action): As section leader of a carrier-based dive- bombing squadron, he participated in a hazardous strike against units of the Japanese fleet west of the Marianas. In the face of tremendous antiaircraft fire of all calibers, he scored a direct hit with his bomb load on a* large enemy carrier.

★ Ens. John 0. Ellsworth, USNR, Kingston, N. Y. (posthumously): As a pilot attached to a fighter squadron operating in the Solomon Islands and Bismarck Archipelago areas from 27 October 1943 to 8 March 1944 he took part in 71 combat missions over Japanese territory. His courageous conduct, excellent teamwork and superior airmanship contributed materially to the success of all missions.

★ Ens. Roy J. O’Neal, USNR, Spring- field, Ohio (missing in action): Piloting a fighter plane in a sweep over Iwo Jima he climbed to attack two large groups of hostile aircraft and, despite the hazards of a low ceiling, personally accounted for three of 33 enemy planes destroyed by his flight. In a fighter-bomber mission over the same area he assisted in destroying 33 Japanese fighters in combat and approximately 40 planes on the ground.

★ Ens. Theodore W. Sterling, USNR, Trenton, N. J. (posthumously): As pilot of a carrier-based torpedo plane in action in the vicinity of the Marianas Islands, he scored two rocket hits on a cargo vessel, leaving it burning and out of control. During a raid on Iwo Jima, his plane was hit by antiaircraft fire which severed an oil line as he approached the target. Although, aware that a forced landing was inevitable, he made a daring bombing and strafing run on a group of parked aircraft, inflicting severe damage on the planes.

★ Raymond A. Wickham, ARM2c, USNR, Burbank, Calif.: As a rear seat gunner in combat against an enemy fleet on 20 June 1944, he assisted in a determined divebombing attack on an enemy carrier. Using his radio equipment with great skill, he assisted his pilot in locating their carrier at night when their plane was extremely low on gas.

Navy and Marine Corps Medal

★ Lt. Richard D. Mansfield, USNR, Somerville, Mass, (posthumously): When a Navy scout bomber crashed into the water while attempting to land on a carrier, he dived over the side into the extremely cold water and proceeded to one of the survivors. Tying a line around the exhausted man, he swam with him toward the ship. Finding the survivor too benumbed to assist himself in any way, he clasped him with his legs and maintained his hold as they were hauled on board.

★ Lt. Arthur L. Newman, USN, Annapolis, Md. (posthumously): As executive officer of the USS Truxton when she foundered off the coast of Newfoundland on 18 Feb. 1942, he exposed himself to powerful wind and subzero temperature to carry out all orders. His self-sacrificing efforts on behalf of others were largely responsible for the rescue of those who survived the eventual destruction of the Truxton.

★ Lt. (jg) Thomas M. Leovy Jr., USNR, San Diego, Calif, (posthumously): As commander of the armed guard aboard the SS Examelia when that vessel was sunk 9 Oct. 1942, he swam to a capsized life boat, assisted in righting it and rescuing 14 survivors. The courageous group were eventually picked up and taken to a South African port. Again under submarine attack after embarking on the SS Zaandam for repatriation, he remained steadfast to the last on the after gun-station of the rapidly sinking ship. Succeeding in getting away as the ship went down he gave his life belt to another who was unable to swim and gallantly refused to get aboard a crowded and badly damaged life boat.

★ Lt. (jg) Julian J. Walilko, USNR, Paterson, N. J.: When the destroyer in which he was serving during the invasion of Sicily was rammed and a boiler explosion was imminent, he made repeated trips to the flooded fireroom and skillfully assisted in plugging a hole in the bulkhead which made it possible to bring the flooding under control. His prompt action materially aided in saving the ship.

★ Ens. Robert E. Huffman, USNR, Compton, Calif: When a fully loaded gasoline truck accidentally became ignited at the Naval Air Station, Quonset Point, R. I., on 1 May 1943, he sounded the alarm, obtained a fire extinguisher and successfully fought the spreading flames. His timely action undoubtedly prevented a disastrous explosion.

★ Ens. Oliver Mollet, USN, La Feria, Tex.: In charge of the forward engine room of a destroyer which was rammed during the invasion of Sicily, he skillfully supervised the securing of the engineering plant and instituted damage-control measures. Working for hours in a partially flooded compartment filled with smoke and steam, he refused to leave his station until the flooding was under control.

★ Ens. Howard W. Taylor, USNR, Kenosha, Wis. (posthumously): When a crew member fell into the icy waters during the foundering of the USS Truxtun on 18 Feb. 1942, he fearlessly dived over the side and fought through a treacherous, pounding surf to return the man safely aboard. His courage and initiative saved the life of a man who otherwise might have perished.

★ Ens. (then CMoMM) William C. VanKirk, USN, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho: While serving in a submarine during a fire, he entered a confined, debris-filled compartment and assisted in the removal of an injured man. Although suffering from smoke and gas, he reentered the compartment and removed another man who was seriously injured and unconscious.

★ Charles B. Chapman, CWT, USN, Chickasaw, Ala.: In charge of a fire- room of a destroyer when it was rammed during the invasion of Sicily, he remained in the fireroom until all boilers were secured, thereby preventing an explosion and probable loss of life. He returned to the compartment later and rendered valuable assistance in effecting repairs which brought the flooding of the fireroom under control.

★ James A. Clifton, CBM, USNR, Norfolk, Va.: As a member of the beach party which rescued the crew of a U. S. warship aground off Tenaga Island, Alaska, when a highline carried away and a man was thrown into the water he promptly manned and launched a small home-made boat, although he had no life jacket. Courageously maneuvering the frail craft through tumultuous surf, he assisted in hauling the injured man into the boat and returned him safely to the beach.

★ Robert E. Dennehy, CBM, USNR, Washington, D. C.: When a flying bomb made a direct hit on a civilian office building at a naval advanced amphibious maintenance base on 21 July 1944, he was badly shocked by blast and practically deafened. However, he made the rounds of all huts and quarters to determine the extent of damage and casualties before consenting to medical treatment. He was then ordered to sick bay where he collapsed from shock and exhaustion.

★ John Urquhart, CMM, USN, Springfield, Mass.: When the destroyer in which he was serving was rammed during the invasion of Sicily, he crawled in darkness through steam, smoke, and debris in order to reach deck-operated valves and isolate a damaged fireroom. Later he entered a flooded compartment and worked under water in extreme danger to supervise temporary repairs which were a decisive factor in saving the ship.

★ Eugene M. Riggleman, CMlc, USNR, Bridgedale, La.: As a member of the 6th Beach Battalion during the invasion of Normandy, he swam 50 yards out to sea under direct enemy artillery fire and against a strong tide to rescue a coxswain of an LCVP, which was disabled and sinking. In spite of a direct hit on the craft while he was aboard, he brought the man safely ashore.

★ Lavon R. Hendrickson, RM2c, USN, Hobbs, NM and Thomas J. Bright, Cox., USNR, East Boston, MA: Serving aboard a seaplane tender in June 1943 when it was involved in a collision at sea, they noticed that one member of the crew had been thrown overboard and was struggling helplessly in the heavy swells. Hendrickson leaped over the side with a life buoy and line and fought his way to the man’s side but lost the line to the ship. Bright then jumped over the side with a line and dragged the helpless crewmen back to safety.

★ William Mesquita, SM2c, USNR, Clarksburg, Calif, (posthumously): Attached to a beach battalion during the invasion of Normandy, he swam to the beach and assisted in caring for wounded and signaled warnings to approaching landing craft. He rushed out on the open beach under a withering fire and payed out rope to a shipmate who was swimming out to rescue two wounded men on a wrecked craft. After the line was tied about one of the wounded soldiers, he coolly brought him to shore as German bullets whipped the water about him.

★ William A. Derosa, Bkr3c, USNR, New York, N. Y. (posthumously): While serving in the USS Pollux when she was stranded on a rocky shore, he was a member of the crew of a motor whaleboat which proceeded through heavy seas during freezing temperatures and successfully ran a line from the vessel to shore. Despite immersion in icy water while landing, he scaled a cliff and endeavored to walk three miles over rough terrain to summon assistance.

★ John B. Hawkins, St3c, USNR, Oklahoma City, Okla. (posthumously): When the rowboat in which he and three small boys were rowing was violently rocked by a passing launch near Plymouth, England, on 11 Aug. 1944, and one of the boys fell overboard, he jumped in the water despite his inability as a swimmer and struggled to save his young companion. He managed to keep the boy’s head above water until a rescue boat arrived but was lost himself before the rescuers could reach him.

★ John J. Miller, MoMM3c, USNR, Michigan City, Ind.: Unhesitatingly going to the aid of a seaman who had fallen overboard while attempting to secure an LCM to a buoy in the waters off a U. S. Navy base on 5 Aug. 1944, he dived over the side and succeeded in reaching and supporting the violently struggling man until they were both hauled aboard by a line thrown from a rescue boat.

★ Herbert C. Reinhardsen, PhM3c, USN, Westchester, N. Y.: Although not attached to the Naval Magazine, Port Chicago, Calif., on the occasion of an explosion on 17 July 1944, he volunteered to enter an area made dangerous by burning ammunition boxcars and worked tirelessly to bring the flames under control. He contributed to the prevention of further explosions and possible loss of life.

★ Morris K. Eagan, Cox., USNR, Phoenix, Ariz.: While attached to an LCM in the waters off New Guinea on 3 May 1944 he unhesitatingly went to the aid of a shipmate who had been thrown overboard during a severe gale. He dove into the raging seas, swam to the dazed and helpless man and, with the aid of a life ring, returned him to the ship.

★ Frank A. Spiller, Cox., USNR, Alliance, Ohio: When the USS Glennon struck a mine, he was thrown from a compartment up and out through a break in the deck. Although wounded himself, he returned to the compartment and succeeded in removing three wounded men, leaving just before the compartment became submerged.

★ Bruce E. McLaughlin, Sic, USNR, Chicago, Ill.: While attached to NTC Gulfport, Miss., he saved the lives of three trainee companions when their sailboat capsized during a storm on 13 Aug. 1944. Leaving his friends clinging to the loosened mast, he negotiated a six-hour swim through choppy seas and sent crash boats to their rescue.

★ John P. Sweeney, Sic, (now AS, V-12) USNR, Rockville, Conn.: When a Navy scout bomber crashed into the water while attempting to land on the flight deck of a carrier during the night of 3 April 1944, he dived into the water and swam to the point where he had last sighted the pilot. Unable to locate the pilot, he swam around the ship to the opposite side and assisted another volunteer swimmer in the rescue of the other survivor.

"Decorations and Citations," in All Hands: Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin, Washington, DC: Bureau of Naval Personnel, NAVPERS-0, No. 354, January 1945, p. 57-69.

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