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August 1961 Approach Magazine : The Naval Aviation Safety Review

August 1961 Approach Magazine : The Naval Aviation Safety Review

Our Product is safety, our process is education, and our profit
is measured in the preservation of lives and equipment.
approach
AUGUST 1961 VOLUME 7 NUMBER 2
CONTENTS
INFREQUENT INSTRUMENTS by W. Bartz 6 There just isn't enough time on actual instruments for many pilots
PROJECT SCAN Flight Safety Foundation 10 A new painless system for reporting near misses protects the pilot
PENETRATING A THUNDERSTORM by Geo. P. Roys 12 Air Force tests with jet aircraft provide important information
UNCALCULATED RISK 16
Below minimum altitude in a weapons training flight is fatal
ROUTINE NIGHT FLOP by LCDR D. H. Howard 22 Not all night carrier flights are as extraordinary as this one
NO CONNECTION 30
Oxygen is no good to the pilot if it can't get to the mask
OXYGEN: IT WILL AND IT WON'T by Maj. Samuel E. Neely USAF 31 Who said 100% oxygen is great for that early morning cure
THE ANTI-G SUIT . . . A MUST! 34
SECOND EJECTION
There is no substitute for experience and this kind is hard to get 35
RAFT OF TROUBLE 36
Out of the Helo and into the water—and things were still tough
DON'T NEGLECT THE OIL SUPPLY 38
QUALITY CONTROL CHECK POINTS 41
LIQUID OXYGEN HAZARDS 42
FUEL SYSTEM CONTAMINATION 44
HATCHES AND DOORS INSIDE BACK
DEPARTMENTS
Letters to the Editor 2 Headmouse 26
Truth and Consequences 16 Flight Surgeon's Notes 32
Monitor 18 Maintenance Notes & Comments 44
Anymouse 20 Murphy's Law 47
Development of USN Aircraft 24 Clipboard 48
LIFT and DRAG
These fine words about aviation safety are val-
uable to us all and come from Major General
Robert W. Burns, United States Air Force:
Like success, flying safety is a journey—not a destination. Aircraft accidents are prevented by moving, dynamic functions of flying safety—not by a set of words which define a goal or outline intent or relate a summary of statistics. Further, flying safety is a composite of many related functions—it is not a single, isolated activity.
To be effective, these functions and activities must be given specific direction and purpose. We must first identify areas of accident potential and then synchronize our collective effort into a clearly understood, working plan which strikes directly at accident causes. This plan must reflect firm, stable policy defined by precise regulations which are enforced by careful and constant supervision. This is the system of law which will govern our journey. It must contain a definite course of action which is the route of our journey. Finally, it must be compatible with and complement our mission. We can avoid accidents in direct proportion to our individual and collective efforts in carrying out this program. Its whole essence is based on our functioning together as an accident prevention team. Who are the responsible members of that team? They are the Commander, the Operations Officer, the Maintenance and Supply Officers, the Weather Officer, the Communications Officer, the Flight Safety Officer, the Doctor, the Personal Equipment Officer, the Chaplain, and most of all, the Pilot and the Airmen who, together, form the foundation of the whole accident prevention structure.
APPROACH
The Naval Aviation Safety Review
Published by U. S. Naval
Aviation Safety Center
RADM William 0. Burch, Jr.
Commander
CDR D. M. Hanson
Head, Literature Department
A. Barrie Young, Jr.
Editor
CDR D. M. Hume
Managing Editor
Associate Editors
LCDR R. A. Eldridge/ Flight Operations
J. T. LeBarron/ Research
J. C. Kiriluk/ Maintenance
Julia Bristow/Aviation Medicine, Survival
Robert B. Trotter/ Art
Associates
J. E. Williams, PHC/ Photographer
A. Navarro, J02/ Production Assistant
Purposes and Policies: APPROACH is published monthly by the U.S. Naval Aviation Safety Center and is distributed free to naval aeronautical organizations on the basis of 1 copy per 12 persons. It presents the most accurate information currently available on the subject of aviation accident prevention. Contents should not be construed as regulations, orders, or directives. Material extracted from Aircraft Accident Reports (OpNays 3750-1 and 3750-10), Medical Officer's Reports (OpNav 3750-8) and Anymouse (anonymous) Reports may not be construed as incriminating under Art. 31, UCMJ. Photos: Official Navy or as credited. Non-naval activities are requested to contact NASC prior to reprinting APPROACH material.
Correspondence: Contributions are welcome as are comments and criticisms. Views expressed in guest-written articles are not necessarily those of NASC. Requests for distribution changes should be directed to NASC, NAS Norfolk 11, Va., Att: Literature Dep't., if you are receiving the magazine free because of military or commercial contact status with the Navy. . . IF YOU ARE A PAID SUBSCRIBER, address all renewals and change of addresses to Superintendent of Documents, Washington 25, D. C.
Printing: Issuance of this publication approved by the Secretary of the Navy on 15 April 1961.
Subscriptions: Single copy 30 cents ; 1-year subscription $3.25 ; 2 yrs.. $6.50 ; 3 yrs., $9.75 ; 75 cents additional for foreign mailing. Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
Library of Congress Catalog No. 57-60020.
1

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