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Charming Wedding Gown 4435 and 4436 - 1900

Charming Wedding Gown 4435 and 4436 - 1900

For the bride of the near future, a more charming wedding gown could not be desired than the one pictured here, developed in white satin Duchesse combined with all-over lace.

The blouse is shaped to accommodate a smooth yoke that is topped by a stylish standing collar. The back is plain except at the top, where there is pretty gathered fulness, and the fronts, which overlap in surplice style, are gracefully full.

A stylish effect is produced by the right front being slashed almost to the center and drawn apart by gathers. The sleeves are close-fitting and are given the result of a double sleeve by a deep facing of lace and an upturning cuff at the elbow.

The skirt is exceptionally graceful and stylish and is shown again at figure No. 145 T and on page 426 of this magazine. It is in eight-gored style with a long train and shows the fashionable dip at the top.

An inverted box-plait is introduced at the lower part of each side seam, and an inverted double box-plait disposes of the fulness at the back. Orange blossoms are arranged effectively as a garniture on the blouse and skirt.

The tulle veil has an embroidered edge, becomingly secured with orange blossoms, and a beautiful bouquet of flowers is carried.

Dressmaker Options

While satin is a general favorite for gowns of this description, many beautiful costumes are being developed in white crepe de Chine, voile, silk, and fine silk muslin, in combination with chiffon, lace, or fancy tucking.

A beautiful costume could be made of white organdy over silk or any suitable lining material, and an airy effect is obtained by appliqué band applied about the bottom, the material being cut away from beneath.

Pattern Information

The blouse pattern, which is No. 4435 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in seven sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-two inches, bust measure, and is illustrated again on page 446.

The skirt pattern, which is No. 4436 and costs 1s. or 25 cents, is in six sizes from twenty- two to thirty-two inches, waist measure, and is portrayed differently on page 454.

Ladies’ Blouse or Bodice No. 4435

Ladies’ Blouse or Bodice No. 4435

No. 4435 Ladies’ Blouse or Bodice, to be made or High or Low Neck and with Full-Length or Elbow Sleeves.

Description on Page 453 | Illustrations on Page 446

Description

This blouse is shown again on the first cover page of this magazine.

This attractive blouse, which may be made with high or low neck and with full-length or elbow' sleeves, is here shown made of mauve crepe de Chine associated with Renaissance lace and decorated with ribbon and bands of narrow' appliqued lace.

The back is plain, save at the top, where it has graceful fulness collected in gathers at the arm-holes and the center; it is short enough to display a smooth, square yoke that is seamed on the right shoulder to a pointed front-yoke, which is more profound than the back-yoke and is closed at the left side.

The fronts are also short and are gathered at the arm-holes and front edges, the right front being wider thru the left, over which it laps. The overlapping edge of the right front is slashed almost to the center and drawn apart by gathers that give pretty fulness to the blouse.

The close-fitting sleeves are shaped with two seams and are extended over the hand. The effect of a double sleeve is produced by making the lower part of the lace and an upturning cuff at the elbow.

When a low-necked blouse is desired, the yokes are omitted, and the sleeves cut off at elbow length. A narrow, plaited bias belt follows the lower edge of the blouse, which is made over a fitted lining, and when made high-necked, a standing collar gives completion.

Dressmaker Options

This design is a desirable one for combining different fabrics. Gray taffeta embroidered in white associated with white spangled net and pink panne will handsomely reproduce the mode.

Soft textiles are particularly adapted to the mode since they drape so gracefully; among the elegant fabrics of this order are vailing, crepe de Chine, mull, mousseline, grenadine, point d’esprit and Liberty silk.

A delicate shade of mauve vailing was associated with shrimp-pink panne for an attractive blouse intended for theatre wear.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4435 in seven sizes, for ladies from thirty to forty-two inches, bust measure.

To make the blouse for a lady of medium size will need three yards of material twenty-seven inches wide with a yard and three-eighths of all-over lace twenty inches wide for the yoke, collar, and lower part of sleeves.

Price of pattern, 10d. or 20 cents.

Ladies’ Eight-Gored Trained Skirt No. 4436

Ladies’ Eight-Gored Trained Skirt No. 4436

No. 4436 Ladies’ Eight-Gored Trained Skirt, having an Inverted Box-Plait at the Lower Part of Each Side Seam and an Inverted Double Box-Plait at the Back.

Could be made with the Conventional or a Decided Dip at the Top and with the Train Square or Round and in Either of Two Lengths.

Description on Page 461 | Illustrations on Page 454

This skirt is again shown in figure No. 145 T and also in the figure on the first cover page of this magazine.

Description

For bridal or other ceremonious wear the eight-gored trained skirt here illustrated developed in both white and black silk will be found particularly desirable.

The skirt is carefully adjusted in sheath effect at the top without the use of darts and may be cut to give the decided or conventional dip, according to the outcome most desired. It flares stylishly toward the foot, where extra width allowed at the side seams is arranged in an inverted box-plaits.

The fullness in the back is laid in an inverted double box-plait that spreads out stylishly into the sweeping train, which may be in either of two lengths and have square or round corners.

The long train measures from the belt at the middle of the back to the lower edge about two yards and three-fourths. An under ruffle of silk stylishly completes the bottom.

Dressmaker Options

A beautiful and elaborate skirt could be developed in heavy white bengaline with accordion-plaited frills of chiffon for decoration and Brussels rose point lace artistically arranged down the front of the skirt; if for a bride, festoons of orange blossoms or bride roses could be added.

Other appropriate materials are faille, voile, peau de soie, or organdy, mull and point d’esprit over silk with decorative embroidered designs of lovers' knots and flowers.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4436 in six sizes for ladies from twenty-two to thirty-two inches waist measure, or thirty-nine to fifty-two and a half inches hip measure.

For a lady of twenty-four inches waist or forty-one inches hip measure, the skirt with full train needs fifteen yards and five-eighths of goods twenty inches wide, while thirteen yards and five-eighths of material in the same width will be needed for the skirt with shorter train.

Price, 1s. or 25 cents.

"Descriptions of Figures in Colors, Tints, Etc., Shown on First Page of Cover and Pages 423 to 437 Inclusive," in The Delineator: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Fashion, Paris-London-New York: The Butterick Publishing Co. Ltd., Vol. LVI, No. 4, October 1900, Front Cover + p. 437, 446, 453-454, 461.

Editor's Note: Some terminology used in the description of women's clothing during the 1800s and early 1900s has been changed to reflect more modern terms. For example, a women's "Toilette" -- a form of costume or outfit has an entirely different common meaning in the 21st century. Typical terms applied to "toilette" include outfit, ensemble, or costume, depending on context.

Note: We have edited this text to correct grammatical errors and improve word choice to clarify the article for today’s readers. Changes made are typically minor, and we often left passive text “as is.” Those who need to quote the article directly should verify any changes by reviewing the original material.

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