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Bridal Gown & Maid-of-Honor Dress 188 T & 189 T - 1900

Bridal Gown, and Dress for Maid-of-Honour

Ladies' Princess Dress Bridal Gown No. 188 T

The luxurious fabrics associated in this gown, together with the perfect adjustment, make the mode one of spectacular beauty. Heavy white satin combined with all-over lace was used in the development, with ribbon, lace edging, chiffon ruchings and artistic arrangement of orange blossoms for garniture.

The dress is in princess style and closes at the back. Fulness is introduced below the waist-line at the center of the back and arranged ill an under-folded double box-plait that falls into the long train, which may be in demi-length and have square or round corners.

At the lower part of the front and side-front seams, fan-plaited sections are introduced with satisfactory results. A high stock-collar is at the neck, and the close-fitting two-seam sleeves are fancifully shaped at the wrist. A bolero (omitted in this instance) is also included in the pattern.

The long tulle veil is secured under a wreath of orange blossoms.

Dressmaker Options

Satin Duchesse, bengaline or corded taffeta could be associated with Renaissance, Cluny or Irish point, with ruches of mousseline, Liberty silk, and ribbon for garniture.

A beautiful gown of heavy white silk has a decoration of white satin ribbon and appliqué lace arranged over the seams.

Pattern Information

The pattern, which is No. 4529 and costs 1s. or 30 cents, is in six sizes for ladies from thirty-two to forty-two inches, bust measure, and may be seen again on page 592.

Ladies’ Princess Press No. 4529

Ladies’ Princess Press No. 4529

No. 4529 Ladies’ Princess Press, closed at the Back, and with Fan Plaits at the Sides of the Skirt that may be omitted, and a Full-Length or Demi Train having Square or Round Corners: to have a High, Round or Square Neck, with or without the Fancy Bolero, and Full-Length Sleeves that may be Shortened or Else Omitted with the Bolero Sleeves and Replaced by Puffs.

Description see Page 603 | Illustrated on Page 592

Description

This dress is represented on page 592, and also at figures Nos. 188 T and 190 T in this number of The Delineator.

Among other noteworthy features of this elegant princess dress may be mentioned the fancy bolero.

The dress is one having many intriguing possibilities and is especially desirable for developing wedding gowns, and also for wear at high social functions, or upon occasions when ceremony demands that the dress be low-necked.

The dress shown is made of Eolienne in one of the pastel hues of mauve combined with all-over white lace and decorated with lace edging, appliqué and ruches of chiffon, closes at the back and shows the easy adjustment that characterizes the princess modes.

It may be made with high, round, or square neck and with full-length or demi-train having rounded or square corners, and when made high-necked is finished with a standing collar that is deepest at the sides.

The bolero is shaped with shoulder and small under-arm seams, and at the lower edge, the back is cut fancifully, the front being caught up prettily a little to the left of the center under a bow of satin ribbon.

The close-fitting two-seam sleeve may be in full-length style extending over the hand, or in elbow length, or it may be omitted and the one-seam bolero sleeve, that ends above the elbow, where it is fancifully shaped, substituted.

The long sleeves and bolero sleeves may be used together if desired, and the pattern also supports a short puff sleeve. At the lower part of the front and side-front seams a fan-plaited section is introduced, giving extra flare at the foot, but it may be omitted.

Below the waist-line at the back extra fulness is allowed and arranged in an under-folded double box-plait that falls out into the train, which, in the full length, measures about two yards and one-fourth from a little below the waist-line to the lower edge.

Dressmaker Options

A wedding gown of Irish poplin combined with Irish point lace trimmed with ribbon or ruchings and the conventional orange blossoms will be decidedly handsome.

Ivory satin is used often for wedding gowns, and a dress developed in this luxurious fabric with tucked chiffon edged with lace appliqué for the bolero would be lovely. Nun’s vailing, Liberty cloth, etc., are also suitable fabrics, and panne velvet could be used for the bolero.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4529 in six sizes for ladies from thirty-two to forty-two inches, bust measure.

For a lady of medium size, the dress with full-length train needs eight yards and three-fourths of fabric forty-four inches wide; the dress with demi-train needs seven yards and seven-eighths of material in the same width, with a yard and one-half of all-over lace eighteen inches wide for the collar and bolero.

Price of pattern, 1s. or 30 cents.

Maid of Honor Dress No. 189 T

Maid of Honor Dress No. 189 T

This ensemble includes a Ladies' blouse or bodice and skirt and is illustrated on page 574.

Contrasting beautifully with the wedding gown is the dress of the maid-of-honor. For its development, pale-pink Liberty cloth instead of the pastel tones was chosen with tucked white chiffon for the guimpe and flowers gracefully arranged for garniture.

The blouse is low and rounded at the top and is characterized by the "1830" shoulders. It is sleeveless and is gathered at the lower edge in front, the fulness puffing out prettily.

The back is plaited at the bottom, and, in front, the fashionable dip is seen defined by a ribbon belt that encircles the waist.

The guimpe has the approved extended shoulders, the armhole seams being concealed by the shoulders of the blouse, but it may be made without shoulder seams if desired.

It extends to the line of the waist and closes at the hack, a high standing collar finishing the neck. The sleeves are in close one-seam style, dart-fitted at the elbow and finished with flared cuffs.

The skirt is in three-piece style, dart-fitted over the hips and has an inverted box-plait at the back. It is distinguished by a tucked circular flounce about the foot and may be made with a short-sweep or in round length.

At the top, in front, the mode shows the approved Marie Antoinette dip to give with the blouse.

Dressmaker Options

Nun's vailing, crêpe de Chine, Liberty panne, etc., are used in reproducing the mode, with all-over lace or fancy silk for the guimpe and appliqués of lace for garniture.

A stylish gown could be of white Liberty satin with ruches of white chiffon edged with black velvet baby-ribbon. The guimpe may be of tucked Persian lawn.

Pattern Information

The waist pattern, which is No. 4530 and costs 9d. or 20 cents, is in seven sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-two, inches, bust measure, and is also shown on page 606.

The skirt pattern, which is No. 4534 and costs 1s. or 25 cents, is in seven sizes from twenty to thirty-two inches, waist measure, and is again illustrated on page 612.

Ladies’ Blouse or Bodice No. 4530

Ladies’ Blouse or Bodice No. 4530

No. 4530 Ladies’ Blouse or Bodice, with “1830” Shoulders, and Guimpe having Long Shoulders with the Arm-Hole Seams Concealed under the Waist Shoulders.

The Guimpe may be made with or without Shoulder Seams and Omitted if Desired, in which case the Waist Arm-Holes may be Finished with Ribbons.

Description see Page 612 | Illustrated on Page 606

Description

This blouse is shown on page 606, and in figure No. 189 T.

The mode is developed in chiffonette in one of the pastel tones of blue, with velvet ribbon and lace-edged ruchings of chiffon for garniture. “1830” shoulders distinguish the waist, which is low and rounding at the neck and has full gathered fronts that close at the center.

The slight fullness in the back is arranged in plaits, and a velvet ribbon belt is drawn around the waist, emphasizing the fashionable Marie Antoinette dip in the front.

A fitted lining supports the garment, which is made with short shoulder seams and is sleeveless and may be worn without the guimpe, in which event the arm-holes are finished with ribbons that are bowed on the shoulders.

The guimpe, which is made of lace and trimmed with edging, is individualized by long shoulders, and extends to a little below the waist. It is fitted by single bust darts and under-arm gores with the closing being made at the back.

The sleeves are in close one-seam style without fulness at the top and dart-fitted over the elbow. A fanciful cuff is at the wrist, and the shoulders of the blouse conceal the armhole seams.

The guimpe may be made with or without shoulder seams, and a high collar gives neck completion.

Dressmaker Options

Soft fabrics such as vailing, cashmere, Lansdowne and albatross are adaptable for the waist and mousseline, chiffon, spangled net, and all-over embroidery for the guimpe.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4530 in seven sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-two inches, bust measure.

To make the blouse for a lady of medium size needs five-eighths of a yard of fabric forty-five inches wide. The guimpe with shoulder seams needs two yards and an eighth of material eighteen inches wide, while without shoulder seams it calls for two yards and one-fourth in the same width.

Price of pattern, 9d. or 20 cents.

Ladies’ Three-Piece Skirt No. 4534

Ladies’ Three-Piece Skirt No. 4534

No. 4534 Ladies’ Three-Piece Skirt, with Tucked Circular Flounce from beneath which the Skirt may be Cut Away and Having an Inverted Box-Plait at the Back.

To be made with the Conventional or Decided Dip at the Top and in Short Sweep or Round Length.

Description see Page 616 | Illustrated on Page 612

Description

This skirt is illustrated on page 612, and also at figures Nos. 189 T and 196 T in this magazine.

The distinguishing feature of the skirt, which is shown developed in pastel-blue cloth, with a row of insertion for decoration, is the tucked circular flounce.

It adds a fancy touch to the otherwise plain skirt, which includes a front-gore and two wide, circular portions that are fitted smoothly over the hips by darts.

Another fashionable feature is the provision, for either the conventional or decided Marie Antoinette dip, and the skirt may be in round or short-sweep length.

The fullness at the back is laid in an inverted box-plait, and the flounce, which is tucked all round at the top, is arranged about the bottom of the design, which may extend beneath the frill or only to the top, as desired.

In the round length the skirt measures about three yards and three-fourths at the lower edge in the medium, sizes and the flounce about seven, yards and one-fourth.

Dressmaker Options

Crepe de Chine, vailing, silk, etc., will be appropriate for the skirt, which may be embellished with passementerie or ruchings.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4534 in seven sizes for ladies from twenty to thirty-two inches waist, or from thirty-seven to fifty-two and one-half inches hip measure.

For a lady of twenty-four inches waist or forty-one inches hip, the skirt extending beneath the flounce needs seven yards and one-fourth of fabric fifty inches wide; the skirt cut away from beneath the flounce, six yards and one-fourth in the same width.

Price of pattern, 1s. or 25 cents.

“Descriptions of Figures in Colors, Tints, Etc., Shown on First Page of Cover and Pages 571 to 591 Inclusive,” in The Delineator: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Fashion, Paris-London-New York-Toronto: The Butterick Publishing Co. Ltd., Vol. LXI, No. 5, November 1900, p. 574, 592, 603, 606, 612, 616.

Editor's Note: Some terminology used in the description of women's clothing during the 1800s and early 1900s has been changed to reflect more modern terms. For example, a women's "Toilette" -- a form of costume or outfit has an entirely different common meaning in the 21st century. Typical terms applied to "toilette" include outfit, ensemble, or costume, depending on context.

Note: We have edited this text to correct grammatical errors and improve word choice to clarify the article for today’s readers. Changes made are typically minor, and we often left passive text “as is.” Those who need to quote the article directly should verify any changes by reviewing the original material.

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