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Ladies Tailored Suits 186 T & 187 T - 1900

The smart coat used dark-green broadcloth, with machine-stitching for the finish. Mixed red and black Cheviot was used in developing the skirt, which is decorated with strappings of plain fabric.

Newest Effects in Tailor Modes

Ladies' Coat and Skirt No. 186 T

Mixed red and black Cheviot was the material here employed in developing the skirt, which is decorated with strappings of plain fabric and shows the fashionable flare at the foot resulting from box-plaits introduced at the lower part of the side seams.

The mode, which is in seven-gored style, is shaped to have the fashionable dip at the top and has an inverted double box-plait at the back. It may be in round or short-sweep length.

The smart coat is faultlessly adjusted and in this instance is developed in dark-green broadcloth, with machine-stitching for the finish.

A shawl collar and the long shoulder effect are becoming features of the mode, and fancy strappings and stitching useful supply decoration. The sleeves bell over the hand and the garment is closed with a fly.

Dressmaker Options

The coat may be developed in Melton, kersey, and other coatings with a collar facing of velvet or peau de soie, and the skirt reproduced in any seasonable woolen goods.

Pattern Information

The coat pattern, which is No. 4486 and costs 9d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure, and is shown again on page 601.

The skirt pattern, which is No. 4397 and costs 1s. or 25 cents, is in nine sizes for ladies from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure.

Ladies’ Coat or Jacket No, 4486

Ladies’ Coat or Jacket No, 4486

No. 4486 Ladies’ Coat or Jacket, with Round or Square Cornered Shawl-Collar.

Description on Page 607 | Illustrated on Page 601

Description

This coat is represented on page 601, and at figures Nos. 186 T and 193 T in this magazine.

Rows of stitching give an attractive finish to the natty coat, which is shown made of black broadcloth. The back and sides are closely adjusted, while the fronts, which are semi-fitted with bust darts, lap rather broadly and close in a fly.

A shawl collar that may be in square or rounding outline is at the neck, and the close-fitting two-seam sleeve bells gracefully over the hand. The shoulders are cut long to give the military effect to the figure, a style that is much in demand just now.

In the small views, the coat is decorated with fancy strappings; a guide is included in the pattern for shaping these ornamental parts.

Dressmaker Options

Melton, kersey, covert cloth, homespun, etc., are preferred materials for the development of top garments. A coat of hunter’s green cloth may have a collar of velvet in a somewhat darker shade stitched in black, and the seams may be covered with strappings of the fabric.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4486 in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure.

For a lady of medium size, the coat needs two yards and an eighth of material fifty-four inches wide (including for strappings).

Price of pattern, 9d. or 20 cents.

Ladies’ Seven-Gored Flare Skirt No. 4397

Ladies’ Seven-Gored Flare Skirt No. 4397

No. 4397 Ladies’ Seven-Gored Flare Skirt, having an Inverted Box-Plait at the Lower Part of each Side Seam, and an Inverted Double Box- Plait at the Back.

To be made with the Conventional or a Decided Dip at the Top and in Round or Short-Sweep Length at the Bottom.

Description see Page 461 | Illustrations see Page 455 (October 1900)

This skirt may be again observed by referring to figures Nos. 147 T and 150 T in October 1900 Issue of The Delineator.

Description

The desirable flare produced by the introduction of an inverted box-plait at the lower part of each side seam and the sheath effect at the top are pronounced characteristics of the seven-gored skirt as developed in zinc-colored cloth with self-strappings for decoration.

The skirt is shaped to fit perfectly smooth at the top without the use of darts and may have the conventional or decided dip in front, according to individual fancy.

The fullness at the back is arranged in an inverted double box-plait that falls in graceful folds to the lower edge, where the skirt falls in an outline of about four yards in the medium sizes. The skirt may be in round or short-sweep length.

Dressmaker Options

A fashionable skirt may be developed in magenta wool poplin with a decoration of black guipure. Mohair, serge, Cheviot, English suiting, homespun, Venetian and Jady’s-cloth, are appropriate for reproduction by the mode.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4397 in nine sizes for ladies from twenty to thirty-six inches waist, or thirty-seven to fifty-eight and one-half inches hip measure.

To make the skirt of material with figure or nap, not including strappings, for a lady of twenty-four inches waist or forty-one inches hip, needs six yards of fabric, forty-four inches wide; including strappings to trim, five yards and one-half fifty inches wide.

Of goods without figure or nap, not including strappings, it needs four yards and one-half of material, forty-four inches wide; including strappings to trim, four yards and one-eighth fifty inches wide.

Price of pattern, 1s. or 25 cents.

Ladies' Coat and Skirt No. 187 T

Newest Effects in Tailor Modes

For shopping, touring, etc., this tailored suit will prove particularly acceptable. English suiting and dark velvet are used in the development, with stitching providing a tailor-like finish.

The coat, which shows the long shoulder effect that is characteristic of military styles, is fitted closely; it is gored to the shoulders, both front, and back, and closed in double-breasted fashion with buttons and button-holes.

The fronts are turned back above the closing in stylish lapels that extend in points beyond the ends of the rolling collar, and at the lower edge, the coat is shaped fancifully. The close-fitting sleeves are scalloped at the wrists and flare over the hands.

The one-piece circular skirt is fitted perfectly close at the top, the fulness at the back being laid in an inverted box-plait. It ripples gracefully at the bottom and is in instep length.

Dressmaker Options

Broadcloth, Melton, kersey, and similar coatings will develop the mode stylishly, with braid, self-strappings, or velvet for the finish. The skirt is equally desirable for plaids and pattern fabrics as for everyday materials.

Pattern Information

The coat pattern, which is No. 4482 and costs 9d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure, and is pictured again on page 600.

The skirt pattern, which is No. 4448 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure.

Ladies' Coat or Jacket No. 4482

Ladies' Coat or Jacket No. 4482

No. 4482 Ladies' Coat or Jacket, Gored to the Shoulders and having a Plain or Fancy Outline at the Lower Edge.

Description see Page 607 | Illustrated on Page 600

Description

This coat is shown on page 600, and in figure No. 187 T in this number.

This well-shaped coat is made of fawn-colored broadcloth with rows of machine-stitching for the finish. The back and sides are carefully adjusted, and the fronts are fitted with seams that extend like the side-back seams to the shoulders.

Above the closing, which is made in double-breasted style with buttons and buttonholes, the fronts are turned back in lapels that extend beyond the ends of the deep rolling collar.

The two-seam sleeves are of correct shaping and are cut in scallops to fall over the hand, and the coat may be straight-around or fancy at the lower edge, according to individual preference.

Dressmaker Options

A handsome coat might be of black satin-faced cloth with an inlay of velvet on the collar and lapels. Cheviot, Melton in medium weight, covert cloth, Venetian, tweed, and tailored fabric of all descriptions are suitable for the reproduction of the design, and the finish will generally be machine-stitching.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4482 in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure.

For a lady of medium size, the coat needs a yard and three-fourths of fabric, fifty-four inches wide.

Price of pattern, 9d. or 20 cents.

Ladies’ One or Two-Piece Circular Skirt No. 4448

Ladies’ One or Two-Piece Circular Skirt No. 4448

No. 4448 Ladies’ One or Two-Piece Circular Skirt with an Inverted Box- Plait at the Back: in Instep or Shorter Length, and to have the Conventional or a Decided Dip at the Top.

For Shopping, Cycling, Golfing, Ice Skating, Stormy Weather, etc., and Equally desirable for Plaids and Pattern Fabrics as for Plain Goods.

Description on Page 464 | Illustrations on Page 402 (October 1900)

Other illustrations of this skirt are shown in figures Nos. 151 T and 159 T in the October 1900 issue of this magazine.

Description

The practical woman recognizes the benefits to be obtained from wearing the slightly shortened skirt, and, in consequence, this useful garment is not only an acknowledged but a necessary part of the well-ordered outfit.

A skirt that will be sure to meet with appreciation when made of fine cloth. In one instance the material is plain and in the other plaid, stitching giving the finish in both cases.

The mode is of circular shaping and is cut in one-piece but may be in two-piece style with a seam at the center of the front and back, if preferred.

A dip at the top of the front that may be conventional or more pronounced distinguishes the skirt, which is dart-fitted over the hips and has fullness at the back laid in an under-folded box-plait that is stitched for a short distance.

The skirt ripples with becoming fulness at the lower edge, where it measures about three yards in the medium sizes and may be made in instep or shorter length.

The mode is a particularly desirable one for touring, shopping, stormy weather wear and for outdoor sports of all descriptions and is equally beneficial for plaids and pattern fabrics as for everyday materials.

Dressmaker Options

For golfing skirts, the favorite color is a very dark iron-gray or black. Oxford suiting will develop the mode stylishly.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4448 in nine sizes for ladies from twenty to thirty-six inches waist, or thirty-seven to fifty-eight and one-half inches hip measure.

For a lady of twenty-four inches waist or forty-one inches hip, the one-piece skirt needs two yards and seven-eighths of fabric fifty-eight inches wide; two yards and three-fourths of material in the same width will be required for the two-piece skirt.

Price of pattern, 10d. or 20 cents.

“Descriptions of Figures in Colors, Tints, Etc., Shown on First Page of Cover and Pages 571 to 591 Inclusive,” in The Delineator: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Fashion, Paris-London-New York-Toronto: The Butterick Publishing Co. Ltd., Vol. LXI, No. 5, November 1900, p. 573, 591, 600-601, 607.

"Descriptions of Figures in Colors, Tints, Etc., Shown on First Page of Cover and Pages 423 to 437 Inclusive," in The Delineator: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Fashion, Paris-London-New York: The Butterick Publishing Co. Ltd., Vol. LVI, No. 4, October 1900, Front Cover, p. 402, 455, 461, 464.

Editor’s Note: Some terminology used in the description of women's clothing during the 1800s and early 1900s has been changed to reflect more modern terms. For example, a women's "Toilette" -- a form of costume or outfit has an entirely different common meaning in the 21st century. Typical terms applied to "toilette" include outfit, ensemble, or costume, depending on context.

Note: We have edited this text to correct grammatical errors and improve word choice to clarify the article for today’s readers. Changes made are typically minor, and we often left passive text “as is.” Those who need to quote the article directly should verify any changes by reviewing the original material.

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