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Ladies Stylish Outdoor Outfits 192 T & 193 T - 1900

Modish Outdoor Toilettes

Ladies' Eton Blouse and Skirt No. 192 T

The extreme good style expressed in the outfit pictured at this figure will gain for it many admirers.

It is shown developed from a lustrous-faced Venetian cloth in a rich royal-blue shade and white Lousine, silver-gray chinchilla affording the decoration; large blue-and-gold buttons are a practical as well as a decorative feature.

The Eton, which blouses becomingly, is closed in a double-breasted style and is further characterized by the turn-down military collar and Garibaldi sleeves.

It has the popular long shoulder effect and the dip in front and is followed at the bottom by a shaped belt. The under-sleeve is mounted on a fitted lining and completed with a wristband, while the upper sleeve is slashed at the back and is in a bell shape.

The skirt is in three-piece style and is exceptionally graceful, showing a curved circular flounce around the bottom and an inverted box-plait at the back, also the approved dip at the top. It is pictured in short-sweep length but may be in round length, if preferred.

Dressmaker Options

Smooth, satin-faced broadcloth, and fine lady's cloth in any of the delicate pastel shades, with decoration of panne in some effective contrast, would develop beautifully by the mode, while a satin-faced camel-hair zibeline in automobile red would be very stylish with a trimming of sable. The style is adaptable to a severe tailor finish, as well as elaborate ornamentation.

Pattern Information

The Eton blouse pattern, which is No. 4488 and costs 9d. or 20 cents, is in seven sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-two inches, bust measure, and is portrayed differently on page 602.

The skirt pattern which is No. 4522 and costs 1s. or 25 cents, is in nine sizes from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure, and is shown again on page 611.

Ladies’ Eton Blouse No. 4488

Ladies’ Eton Blouse No. 4488

No. 4488 Ladies’ Eton Blouse, to be worn Closed or Open, and to be made with a Turn-Down or Standing Military Collar, and with Garibaldi or Plain Jacket Sleeves.

Description on Page 608

Description

Illustrations of this blouse are shown on page 602, and in figure No. 192 T in this number of The Delineator.

The Eton blouse is a simple and becoming garment and is pictured made of light cloth associated with dark panne velvet, and light silk for the under-sleeves, strappings of the fabric being used for decoration.

The blouse is shaped with extended shoulders that produce the fashionable military effect now so desirable. It is tightly fitted at the back and sides, and the fronts are gathered at the waist, where they puff out attractively and are lapped and closed in double-breasted style, but they may be worn open.

The fronts, which are rounded gracefully, are turned back to form revers, and the neck is finished with a turn-down or a standing military collar.

The Garibaldi sleeve consists of a one-seam over the part that flares over a full, short under-portion arranged on a two-seam lining and finished with a narrow wristband. The over-portion bells at the lower edge and is slashed at the back of the arm, and the pattern also supports plain two-seam sleeves.

The lower edge of the blouse, which describes the fashionable Marie Antoinette dip in front, is followed by a shaped belt that has a pointed overlapping end to correspond with the wristband and collar.

Dressmaker Options

A dressy blouse could be made up in a combination of black velvet and white silk with garniture of a narrow gilt braid. Tan cloth associated with dark-brown velvet and stone martin will be stylish and be becoming.

Covert cloth, Cheviot, and broadcloth would develop beautiful blouses, and braid, appliqué lace or fur would be appropriate for decoration.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4488 in seven sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-two inches, bust measure.

For a lady of medium size, the blouse not including strappings requires three yards and one-fourth of goods twenty-seven inches wide, or one yard and three-fourths of material fifty-four inches wide, including strappings.

In either case, five-eighths of a yard of silk twenty inches wide will be needed for the under-sleeves, and a yard and one-fourth of velvet in the same width for the belt, wristbands, collar and for facing the revers.

Price of pattern, 9d. or 20 cents.

Ladies’ Three-Piece Skirt No. 4522

Ladies’ Three-Piece Skirt No. 4522

No. 4522 Ladies’ Three-Piece Skirt, having an Inverted Box-Plait at the Back, and a Curved Circular Flounce from Beneath which the Skirt may be Cut Away.

To be made with the Conventional or Decided Dip at the Top, and in Short-Sweep or Round Length.

Description on Page 616 | illustrated on page 611

Description

This skirt is illustrated on page 611, and in figure No. 192 T in this magazine.

The mode is desirable for development in any of the fashionable silk or woolen fabrics, the brown cloth being the choice in the present instance. It is in three-piece style, smoothly adjusted over the hips by darts and having the fulness at the back laid in an inverted box-plait.

The skirt may be shaped to have the regular or decided dip at the top and is in sheath style to below the knee, from which point it flares stylishly.

It may be in short-sweep or round length and is given added grace by an applied circular flounce arranged at the foot; the frill has a curved upper outline, and the skirt may be cut away from beneath it if desired.

In the medium sizes the mode measures about three yards round at the foot, and the flounce about four yards and one-fourth.

Dressmaker Options

A beautiful skirt evolves from a combination of embroidered and plain black taffeta, with embroidered taffeta employed for the flounce.

Pattern Information

Wo have pattern No. 4522 in nine sizes for ladies from twenty to thirty-six inches waist, or thirty-seven to fifty-eight and one-half inches hip measure.

For a lady of twenty-four inches waist or forty-one inches hip, the skirt with the gores extending beneath the flounce needs four yards and one-half of fabric fifty-four inches wide, and the skirt with the gores cut away from beneath the frill, three yards and three-fourths in the same width.

Price of pattern, 1s. or 25 cents.

Ladies' Coat and Skirt No. 193 T

Modish Outdoor Toilettes

A slightly shortened skirt is included in every well-appointed wardrobe and being practical for varied purposes stormy weather, golfing, traveling, and general wear—hat gained almost universal popularity.

A circular skirt of this type and a light short coat are associated in the costume represented here developed in gray mixed tweed suiting and heavy corded silk of lighter tone, with a simple decoration of machine-stitching. The coat has a rounding shawl-collar and is fully described at figure No. 186 T.

The new habit back, which is an inverted box-plait stitched down, is the particular item of interest in the skirt that may be made with or without a fiat circular flounce from beneath which the skirt may be cut away.

It extends to the instep in this instance, though it may be shorter if desired, and is shaped to produce the fashionable dip at the top in front.

Dressmaker Options

Double-faced suiting in dark Oxford, blue, or brown would develop the mode satisfactorily for wear upon almost every occasion when this suit would be appropriate.

Cheviot, tweed, storm serge, Scotch mixtures, and rain-proof fabrics may be used for serviceable costumes, with machine-stitching, stitched straps of the material and mohair braids for the finish.

Pattern Information

The coat pattern, which is No. 4486 and costs 9d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure, and is illustrated again on page 601.

The skirt pattern, which is No. 4510 and costs 9d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure, and may be seen again on page 614.

Ladies’ Coat or Jacket No. 4486

Ladies’ Coat or Jacket No. 4486

No. 4486 Ladies’ Coat or Jacket, with Round or Square Cornered Shawl-Collar.

Description on Page 607

Description

This coat is represented on page 601, and in figures Nos. 186 T and 193 T in this magazine.

Rows of stitching give an attractive finish to the natty coat, which is shown made of black broadcloth. The back and sides are closely adjusted, while the fronts, which are semi-fitted with bust darts, lap rather broadly and close in a fly.

A shawl collar that may be in square or rounding outline is at the neck, and the close-fitting two-seam sleeve bells gracefully over the hand. The shoulders are cut long to give the military effect to the figure, a style that is very much sought just now.

In the small views, the coat is shown decorated with fancy strappings; a guide is included in the pattern for shaping these ornamental parts.

Dressmaker Options

Melton, kersey, covert cloth, homespun, etc., are preferred materials for the development of top garments. A coat of hunter’s green cloth may have a collar of velvet in a somewhat darker shade stitched in black, and the seams may be covered with strappings of the fabric.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4486 in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure.

For a lady of medium size, the coat needs two yards and an eighth of material fifty-four inches wide (including for strappings).

Price of pattern, 9d. or 20 cents.

Ladies’ Circular Skirt No. 4510

Ladies’ Circular Skirt No. 4510

No. 4510 Ladies’ Circular Skirt, with the New Habit, Back having an Inverted Box-Plait Stitched Down: to be in Instep or Shorter Length with a Flat Circular Flounce from Beneath which the Skirt may be Cut Away, or in Either Length without a Flounce; and to have the Conventional or Decided Dip at the Top.

For Shopping, Touring, Golfing, Risking, Stormy Weather, etc.

Description on Page 617 | illustrated on page 614

Description

This skirt is illustrated on page 614, and in figure No. 193 T in this magazine.

The hygienic short skirt is still gaining in favor, not only for outdoor sports and stormy weather but general wear.

The one under consideration introduces a novelty in the flat circular flounce and the new habit back, the latter effect being produced by an inverted box-plait stitched down for a short distance from the top, and with the aid of darts, the skirt fits smoothly about the hips.

The style is of circular shaping and ripples stylishly below the hips and at the back with the length at instep or shorter; it shows the fashionable Marie Antoinette dip at the top, which may be conventional or decided, according to individual preference.

A flat circular flounce, finished with rows of machine-stitching, is a striking feature of the mode, and the skirt may extend beneath the frill or be cut away, as desired; or the flounce may be omitted altogether.

The skirt measures about three yards and one-fourth, and the flounce about three yards and three-fourths at the lower edge in the medium sizes.

Dressmaker Options

Cloth, Serge, Cheviot, or double-face material would develop a very stylish and serviceable skirt by the mode, with machine-stitching or self-strappings for the finish.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4510 in nine sizes for ladies from twenty to thirty-six inches waist, or thirty-seven to fifty-eight and one-half inches hip measure.

For a lady of twenty-four inches waist or forty-one inches hip, the skirt extending beneath the flounce needs three yards and one-eighth of fabric fifty-four inches wide; the skirt cut away from beneath the frill or without the ruffle, two yards and five-eighths of material in the same width.

Price of pattern, 9d. or 20 cents.

“Descriptions of Figures in Colors, Tints, Etc., Shown on First Page of Cover and Pages 571 to 591 Inclusive,” in The Delineator: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Fashion, Paris-London-New York-Toronto: The Butterick Publishing Co. Ltd., Vol. LXI, No. 5, November 1900, p. 576, 601-602, 607-609, 611, 614, 616-617.

Editor's Note: Some terminology used in the description of women's clothing during the 1800s and early 1900s has been changed to reflect more modern terms. For example, a women's "Toilette" -- a form of costume or outfit has an entirely different common meaning in the 21st century. Typical terms applied to "toilette" include outfit, ensemble, or costume, depending on context.

Note: We have edited this text to correct grammatical errors and improve word choice to clarify the article for today’s readers. Changes made are typically minor, and we often left passive text “as is.” Those who need to quote the article directly should verify any changes by reviewing the original material.

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