Browse The Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives Home Page

Ladies Outdoor Garment 351 L - August 1890

Ladies Outdoor Garment 351 L - 1890

In the present instance, Aubergine and cream-white cloth are united in the jacket, with silver braid and machine-stitching for a completion.

The jacket is adjusted stylishly by under-arm and side-back gores, and a well-curved center seam which ends a little below the waist-line at the top of coat-laps rounded at their lower corners.

The fronts finished with a handsome collar, which passes across the back and tapers narrowly to the bottom, fall apart stylishly. The collar rolls in Medici fashion its entire length and is decorated handsomely with a fancy design done in a silver braid.

Two openings for pockets are made in the right side of the jacket, and one in the left, and both are concealed by pocket-laps, which are outlined by machine-stitching and finished at each upper corner with a triangular ornament done with a twist.

The coat sleeves are gathered at the top to produce a high impression above the shoulders, and a cuff is outlined on each by several rows of machine stitching, a button being placed ornamentally back of the wrist. Machine-stitching also follows the lower outline of the jacket.

The vest, which is shown stylishly between the fronts of the jacket, is pictured made of figured pique. The smooth adjustment is affected using single bust darts, under-arm seams, and a well curved center seam.

The closing is made with buttons and button-holes, and a point is shaped at each side of the closing. The top of the vest is cut out at the front in a shallow V-shape to show the elegant chemisette, Piccadilly collar, and puff scarf; and the edges are bound with washable braid.

A welt conceals an opening for a pocket, made at each side near the lower edge.

The jacket will be favored for wear during the early Autumn.

Costume Options

All varieties of light-weight cloth, plain, checked, or striped cloaking, etc., will develop charmingly by the mode; and the decoration may consist of braiding or embroidery done with fancy cords, or a simple finish of machine-stitching may be adopted.

For Autumn wear the collar will be made of velvet, heavy corded silk, or Astrakhan, in which case the braiding may be omitted. The vest may be made of piqué, all sorts of fancy vesting, etc., and a finish of machine-stitching will always be in good taste.

The stylish toque is draped with velvet and trimmed with fancy pins.

Terminology

Aubergine - another term for eggplant.

Illustration and Pattern Information

Figure No. 351 L.—This consists of a Ladies’ jacket and vest. The jacket pattern, which is No. 3385 (illustrated below) and costs Is. 3d. or 30 cents, is in thirteen sizes for ladies from twenty-eight to forty-six inches, bust measure, and may be seen again on page 83 of this magazine.

The vest pattern, which is No. 3384 (illustrated below) and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is also in thirteen sizes for ladies from twenty-eight to forty-six inches, bust measure, and is differently portrayed on page 84.

LADIES’ JACKET Pattern No. 3385.

LADIES’ JACKET Pattern No. 3385.

The jacket represented is made of Aubergine and white cloth and decorated with silver braid on figure No. 351 L (above) in this Delineator, where it forms part of a costume.

The jacket pictured above, developed in light-weight cloth with adjustments available by under-arm and side-back gores, and a well-curved center seam that ends a little below the waistline at the top of coat-laps, the lower corners of a rounded cut.

The fronts are narrow and loose-fitting and separate all the way down. At the neck is a collar that has a seam at the back and extends to the lower edges of the fronts, with rounded lower corners.

It adds to the width of the fronts and may roll in Medici fashion nearly to or all the way to the lower edge, as preferred, either arrangement giving a decidedly stylish air to the garment.

If desired, the fronts may be held together near the waist-line using straps, which are furnished by the pattern; they are secured underneath to the collar with buttons and button-holes.

A pocket inserted near the lower part of each front has an opening being concealed by a deep pocket-lap, which is cut rounding at the lower corners; and a smaller pocket is inserted in the right front a short distance above the lower one and finished with a small pocket-lap.

The stylish coat-sleeves are gathered at the top to rise high above the shoulders, and two rows of machine-stitching finish each wrist edge.

Two rows of stitching finish the loose edges of the jacket, with a row of stitching at each side of the joining of the collar.

Costume Options

The mode may be developed in all sorts of fancy cloaking appropriate for jackets, Cheviot, lady’s cloth, flannel, serge, cashmere, etc., is well liked. Velvet may be united with wool goods, being used for the collar and pocket-laps; and sometimes the sleeves will also be made of velvet.

One or several rows of machine-stitching will generally be used for finishing the edges, though, if preferred, these may be decorated with cord or bound merely with silk or mohair braid. A silk lining may be added to the jacket if desired.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 3385 in thirteen sizes for ladies from twenty- eight to forty-six inches, bust measure.

To make the garment for a lady of medium size will need four yards and a half of material twenty-two inches wide, or two yards and a-fourth forty-four inches wide, or a yard and five-eighths fifty-four inches wide.

Price of pattern, 1s. 3d. or 30 cents.

LADIES’ VEST No. 3384.

LADIES’ VEST No. 3384.

Another view of this vest on figure No. 351 L in this magazine shows the garment made of figured piqué.

The vest is here pictured developed in white piqué showing a colored flower, and plain white muslin.

The fronts are fitted smoothly to the figure by single bust darts and closed with buttons and button-holes, and the back is adjusted by a curving center seam and joined to the fronts by under-arm and shoulder seams.

At the neck is a high standing collar, and on each side of the front near the lower edge is applied a pocket-welt, which may conceal a pocket opening, if desired.

The fronts shape a notch below the closing and a high arch over the hips. A line of perforations in the upper part shows where the vest may be cut away at the neck if desired.

Costume Options

Such a vest may be worn with a blazer or tennis costume, and all sorts of fancy suitings and vesting, Cheviot, piqué, linen, etc., may be chosen for it.

The back will generally be made of muslin, Farmer satin, or Silesia; and one or several rows of machine-stitching may follow the edges of the vest, pocket-welts, and collar.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 3384 in thirteen sizes for ladies from twenty-eight to forty-six inches, bust measure.

For a lady of medium size, it will need one yard of material twenty-two inches wide, or three-fourths of a yard twenty-seven inches wide, or five-eighths of a yard either thirty-six or forty-four inches wide, each with one yard of lining thirty-six inches wide for the backs, etc.

Price of pattern, 10d. or 20 cents.

"Figure No. 351 L.—LADIES’ OUTDOOR GARMENTS," in The Delineator: A Journal of Fashion, Culture, and Fine Arts – Midsummer Number, New York: Butterick Publishing Co., Ltd, Vol. XXXVI, No. 2, August 1890, P. 78 (For Illustrations see Page 78).

"LADIES’ JACKET [Pattern No. 3385]," in The Delineator: A Journal of Fashion, Culture, and Fine Arts – Midsummer Number, New York: Butterick Publishing Co., Ltd, Vol. XXXVI, No. 2, August 1890, P. 81 (For Illustrations see Page 83).

"LADIES’ VEST [No. 3384]," in The Delineator: A Journal of Fashion, Culture, and Fine Arts – Midsummer Number, New York: Butterick Publishing Co., Ltd, Vol. XXXVI, No. 2, August 1890, P. 82-83 (For Illustrations see Page 94).

Editor's Note: Some terminology used in the description of women's clothing during the 1800s and early 1900s has been changed to reflect more modern terms. For example, a women's "Toilette" -- a form of costume or outfit has an entirely different common meaning in the 21st century. Typical terms applied to "toilette" include outfit, ensemble, or costume, depending on context.

Note: We have edited this text to correct grammatical errors and improve word choice to clarify the article for today’s readers. Changes made are typically minor, and we often left passive text “as is.” Those who need to quote the article directly should verify any changes by reviewing the original material.

Return to Top of Page

Vintage Outerwear Fashions Archives