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Ladies Fashionable Mourning Attire 158-160 T - 1900

Fashionable Mourning Outfits - View 1

Ladies' Jacket and Skirt No. 158 T

This mourning dress is of graceful shaping and is admirable for practical outdoor wear. Fine black Cheviot was used in the development with Persian lamb for facing the collar and fronts of the jacket, which is fully described in Figure No. 139 T. Rows of machine-stitching supply a neat finish to the toilette.

The skirt is in five-gored style with a short sweep and is shaped to flare gracefully at the bottom. It is distinguished by narrow side-gores and a band flounce that flares very slightly and is of circular shaping.

An inverted box-plait disposes of the fulness at the back, and the mode shows the fashionable dip at the top.

Dressmaker Options

Broadcloth with facings of broadtail would develop a fashionable mourning dress.

Pattern Information

The jacket pattern, which is No. 4402 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure, and is portrayed differently on page 443.

The skirt pattern, which is No. 4429 and costs 1s. or 25 cents, is in nine sizes from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure, and is illustrated again on page 460.

Ladies’ Jacket No. 4402

Ladies’ Jacket No. 4402

No. 4402 Ladies’ Jacket, to have the Fronts Closed at the Centre or Overlapped in Double-Breasted Fashion or Worn Open. (Known as the Jacket Sans Revers.)

For Description see Page 451

Different developments of this jaunty jacket are shown at figures Nos. 139 T and 158 T in this magazine.

Description

The long effect from shoulder to bust — a prominent feature of the newest jackets — emphasizes the natty top garment here shown made of satin-faced cloth with Persian lamb and also in dark velvet combined with chinchilla fur.

The mode is known as the Jacket Sans Revers and reaches to a short distance below the line of the waist; it is snugly adjusted at the back and sides by the regulation seams and gores, the center-back seam terminating to form a vent.

The fronts have the slightest suggestion of a point at the lower edge and are semi tight-fitting; they may be lapped to the throat and closed in double-breasted style or be worn open and rolled as shown in one of the large front view's or closed only at the throat and rolled as shown in the small illustration.

A high, sectional collar that Hares at the throat gives a becoming touch to the mode, and the closely adjusted sleeves may bell over the hand or be straight-around.

Broadcloth, covert, Venetian and all suitable tailor cloths may be used in the reproduction of the jacket with fur for the collar and for facing the fronts.

Dressmaker Options

Hunter’s green cloth combined with mink would develop a very stylish and serviceable jacket, and the closing could be accomplished with cord loops and olives.

An attractive jacket could be made of dark-brown or black light-weight melton, and the finish may be plain, or braid or narrow fur bindings may be added.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4402 in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure.

To make the jacket for a lady of medium size requires a yard and five-eighths of material fifty-four inches wide.

Price of pattern, 10d. or 20 cents.

Ladies' Five-Gored Skirt No. 4429

Ladies' Five-Gored Skirt No. 4429

No. 4429 Ladies' Five-Gored Skirt with Short Sweep and Flared at the Bottom and having a Narrow Side-Gore and Slightly Circular Band Flounce, and an Inverted Box-Plait at the Back. (To have the Conventional or a Decided Dip at the Top.)

For Description see Page 463 | For Illustrations see Page 460

Refer to figure No. 155 T - Ladies Negligee Garment for a different view of this skirt.

Description

A narrow gore at each side and a band flounce are the distinguishing features of the five-gored skirt here illustrated developed in magenta Venetian cloth finished with machine-stitching.

The skirt is fitted at the top by a single hip dart at each side and has the fulness at the back laid in an inverted box-plait. At the bottom, the skirt flares gracefully and is relieved of severe plainness by a slightly circular band flounce.

The skirt may have the conventional or a decided dip at the top, according to the style most liked, and is in short-sweep length at the bottom, where it measures, in the medium sizes, about four yards.

Dressmaker Options

Modish skirts may be reproduced by the design of satin Liberty cloth, vailing cashmere, voile, etc., and decoration of applique lace, braid or embroidered bands may be added.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4429 in nine sizes for ladies from twenty to thirty-six inches waist, or thirty-seven to fifty- eight and one-half inches hip measure.

To make the skirt for a lady of twenty-four inches waist or forty-one inches hip requires four yards and three-eighths of goods fifty inches wide.

Price of pattern, 1s. or 25 cents.

Ladies' Jacket and Skirt No. 159 T

Fashionable Mourning Outfits - View 1

Self-strappings give a neat and tailor-like finish to this outfit, which is here pictured made of black cheviot. The coat or jacket is gracefully adjusted and is fully described at figure No. 140 T.

The skirt is of comfortable walking length and, in this instance, is made with a seam at the center of the front and back. It may be in one piece and is equally appropriate for cycling, golfing, etc., and is fully described at figure No. 144 T, where it is developed for evening wear for a young girl.

Dressmaker Options

Double-faced cloth would develop the skirt stylishly, and melton or any of the fashionable coatings may be used for the coat with fur for decoration or a plain finish of stitching.

Pattern Information

The jacket pattern, which is No. 4458 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure, and is differently shown on page 443.

The skirt pattern, which is No. 4448 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure, and is again pictured on page 462.

Ladies’ One or Two-Piece Circular Skirt no. 4448

Ladies’ One or Two-Piece Circular Skirt no. 4448

No. 4448 Ladies’ One or Two-Piece Circular Skirt with an Inverted Box- Plait at the Back: in Instep or Shorter Length, and to have the Conventional or a Decided Dip at the Top.

For Shopping, Cycling, Golfing, Ice Skating, Stormy Weather, etc., and Equally desirable for Plaids and Pattern Fabrics as for Plain Goods.

For Description see Page 464 | For Illustrations see Page 402

Other illustrations of this skirt are shown in figure Nos. 151 T Ladies' Traveling Outfit and 159 T Ladies' Jacket and Skirt in this magazine.

Description

The practical woman recognizes the benefits to be obtained from wearing the slightly shortened skirt, and, in consequence, this useful garment is not only an acknowledged but a necessary part of the well-ordered outfit.

A skirt that will be sure to meet with appreciation is here shown made of cloth. In one instance the material is plain and in the other plaid, stitching giving the finish in both cases.

The mode is of circular shaping and is cut in one- piece but may be in two-piece style with a seam at the center of the front and back, if preferred.

A dip at the top of the front that may be conventional or more pronounced distinguishes the skirt, which is dart-fitted over the hips and has fullness at the back laid in an under-folded box-plait that is stitched for a short distance.

The skirt ripples with becoming fulness at the lower edge, where it measures about three yards in the medium sizes and may be made in instep or shorter length.

The mode is a particularly desirable one for touring, shopping, stormy weather wear and for outdoor sports of all descriptions and is equally desirable for plaids and pattern fabrics as for plain goods.

Dressmaker Options

For golfing skirts, the favorite color is a very dark iron-gray or black. Oxford suiting will develop the mode stylishly.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4448 in nine sizes for ladies from twenty to thirty-six inches waist, or thirty-seven to fifty-eight and one-half inches hip measure.

For a lady of twenty-four inches waist or forty-one inches hip, the one-piece skirt needs two yards and seven-eighths of goods fifty-eight inches wide; two yards and three-fourths of goods in the same width will be required for the two-piece skirt.

Price of pattern, 10d. or 20 cents.

Ladies’ Double-Breasted Coat or Jacket No. 4458

Ladies’ Double-Breasted Coat or Jacket No. 4458

For Description see Page 451 | For Illustrations see Page 443

This coat may be seen again by referring to figures Nos. 140 T Outdoor Dress and 159 T Ladies' Jacket and Skirt in this number of The Delineator.

Description

A coat cut on the most approved lines is here pictured made of fine cloth finished with stitching. It is closely adjusted at the back and sides, and the fronts are semi tight-fitting and closed in double-breasted style with buttons and button-holes.

Above the closing, the fronts are turned back in pointed lapels that meet and extend beyond the ends of the rolling collar.

The darts and side-back seams are discontinued to form vents with rounding corners, but they may be continued to the bottom to give a straight-around outline if liked.

Pockets covered with laps are inserted low down in the fronts, and the sleeves are in close-fitting two-seam style completed with turn-back cuffs finished corresponding with the lower edge of the jacket.

Dressmaker Options

Cheviot, covert cloth, broadcloth and all the tailor fabrics are suitable for the reproduction of coats of this description, and machine-stitching or strappings will give an approved finish.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4458 in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure.

To make the coat for a lady of medium size will require a yard and three-fourths of goods fifty-four inches wide.

Price of pattern, 10d. or 20 cents.

Ladies' Eton Blouse and Skirt No. 160 T

Fashionable Mourning Outfits - View 1

Heavy black serge was the material employed in reproducing this outfit in combination with grosgrain silk which was tucked for the vest front and standing collar. Strappings of the serge and silk and machine-stitching provide pretty decoration.

The Eton blouse is smooth at the back but has fullness at the bottom of the fronts which pouch prettily. The fronts are broadly reversed to form the front of the deep sailor-collar, and the sleeves are in plain two-seam style.

The skirt is a five-gored mode and is in instep length; it is fully described in Figure No. 140 T.

The outfit would be attractively developed in Henrietta or wool poplin, with taffeta for the vest front, collar, and strappings.

Pattern Information

The Eton pattern, which is No. 4352, and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in seven sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-two inches, bust measure.

The skirt pattern, which is No. 4449, and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure, and may be seen again on page 461 of this number of The Delineator.

Ladies’ Five-Gored Skirt No. 4449

Ladies’ Five-Gored Skirt No. 4449

No. 4449 Ladies’ Five-Gored Skirt with an Inverted Box-Plait at the Lower Part of each Side Seam and One at the Centre of the Back: to be in Instep or Shorter Length and to Have the Conventional or a Decided Dip at the Top.

For Shopping, Touring, Golfing, Ice Skating, Stormy Weather, etc.

For Description see Page 464 | For Illustrations see Page 461

This skirt is represented again at figure Nos. 140 T Ladies' Outdoor Dress and 160 T (above).

Description

The skirt that extends only to the instep or is of shorter length is now receiving considerable attention. For shopping, touring, golfing, ice skating, stormy weather, etc., it is practical, neat, and stylish and is almost universally adopted.

The mode here illustrated made of double-faced cloth and decorated with machine-stitched strappings of the material is in five-gored style and is an admirable design.

It is fitted perfectly smooth over the hips without the employment of darts and has fullness at the center of the back laid in an inverted box-plait that is stitched for a short distance from the top. The skirt may have the conventional or a decided dip at the top in front, according to preference.

The adjustment at the top produces the fashionable close effect, and extra width allowed at the lower part of each side seam for inverted box-plaits gives the stylish dare at the bottom which is a feature of' the newest modes. The skirt falls in an outline of about three and one-half yards in the medium sizes.

Dressmaker Options

A serviceable skirt could be evolved from light-weight double-faced covert cloth with machine-stitching for the finish.

Pattern Information

We have the pattern - No. 4449 in nine sizes for ladies from twenty to thirty-six inches waist, or thirty-seven to fifty-eight and one-half inches hip measure.

To make the skirt of material with figure or nap for a lady of twenty-four inches waist or forty-one inches hip, requires three yards and three-eighths fifty-eight inches wide; of material without figure or nap, three yards in the same width.

Price, 10d. or 20 cents.

"Descriptions of Figures in Colors, Tints, Etc., Shown on First Page of Cover and Pages 423 to 437 Inclusive," in The Delineator: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Fashion, Paris-London-New York: The Butterick Publishing Co. Ltd., Vol. LVI, No. 4, October 1900, p. 402, 443, 451, 461-464.

Editor's Note: Some terminology used in the description of women's clothing during the 1800s and early 1900s has been changed to reflect more modern terms. For example, a women's "Toilette" -- a form of costume or outfit has an entirely different common meaning in the 21st century. Typical terms applied to "toilette" include outfit, ensemble, or costume, depending on context.

Note: We have edited this text to correct grammatical errors and improve word choice to clarify the article for today’s readers. Changes made are typically minor, and we often left passive text “as is.” Those who need to quote the article directly should verify any changes by reviewing the original material.

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