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Ladies Graceful Promenade Costume 149 T - 1900

Graceful Promenade Costume

Described on Page 443 | For Illustration see Page 429

Description

A smart jacket sans revers and a graceful five-gored skirt compose the costume stylishly developed in brown-and-white shepherd’s plaid.

Folds of smooth-faced cloth corresponding with the dark-brown check in the material and stitched with white were used as a decoration for the skirt and jacket. Faultless adjustment characterizes the jacket, which is of stylish depth and laps in double-breasted fashion.

Vents are formed at the darts and side-back seams to give the desirable spring below the waist, and a deep, rolling collar completes the neck. The close-fitting sleeves bell stylishly at the bottom.

An inverted box-plait at the lower part of each side seam and one at the center of the back are features of the skirt, which flares at the foot and shows the fashionable dip.

Pattern Information

The pattern, which is No. 4454 and costs Is. 3d. or 30 cents, is in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure, and is shown again on page 439 of this issue.

Ladies’ Two-Piece Costume No. 4454

Ladies’ Two-Piece Costume No. 4454

No. 4454 Ladies’ Two-Piece Costume: consisting of a Jacket Sans Revers, and a Five-Gored Skirt having an Inverted Box-Plait at the Lower Part of each Side Seam and One at the Centre of the Back. (The Skirt to be made with the Conventional or a Decided Dip at the Top and in Round or Short-Sweep Length at the Bottom.)

For Description see Page 449. | For Illustrations see Page 439.

No. 4454. — This costume is represented again at figure No. 149 T in this number of the Delineator.

Description

Graceful lines and correct shaping are two essential characteristics of the tailored costume. An excellent example that displays both these qualities is here pictured made of dark-gray tailor cloth with velvet in a darker shade for inlaying the collar and rows of machine-stitching for the finish.

The skirt is a five-gored mode that is fitted over the hips by darts; it is distinguished by the conventional dip at the top of the front which may be more pronounced if liked.

It has fullness at the lower part of each of the seams at the front and sides laid in an inverted box-plait, a similar plait disposing of the fulness at the top of the back. In the medium sizes, the skirt falls in an outline of about three yards and a half and may be made in round or short-sweep length at the bottom.

The jacket, which is a new mode sans revers, is carefully adjusted at the back and sides, while the fronts, which are semi tight-fitting, close almost to the throat in double-breasted style with buttons and button-holes.

The darts and side-back seams terminate a short distance from the lower edge to form vents, and a deep, rolling collar is at the neck. The sleeves are in two-seam coat style, and bell slightly over the hand, and the jacket may be worn open and stylishly rolled, if liked.

Dressmaker Options

Blue whipcord with black velvet for the collar will reproduce the mode well, or Venetian cloth in light tan will be effective with self-strappings for a finish. Vicuna, covert cloth, broadcloth, etc., are much used for costumes of this description, stitching or strappings being the most approved completion.

A going-away gown for an Autumn bride was of mode cloth with velvet in a darker shade for the collar and white silk for lining the jacket. A white taffeta shirt-waist was worn.

Pattern Information

We have pattern No. 4454 in nine sizes, for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure.

To make the costume for a lady of medium size requires four yards and seven-eighths of goods fifty-four inches wide with one-fourth of a yard of velvet twenty inches wide (cut bias) for inlaying the collar.

Price of pattern, 1s. 3d. or 30 cents.

"Descriptions of Figures in Colors, Tints, Etc., Shown on First Page of Cover and Pages 423 to 437 Inclusive," in The Delineator: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature and Fashion, Paris-London-New York: The Butterick Publishing Co. Ltd., Vol. LVI, No. 4, October 1900, p. 429, 439, 443, 449.

Note: We have edited this text to correct grammatical errors and improve word choice to clarify the article for today’s readers. Changes made are typically minor, and we often left passive text “as is.” Those who need to quote the article directly should verify any changes by reviewing the original material.

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