Bordered Materials and Flouncings on Dresses - 1913

Dress Fashions Featuring Bordered Materials and Flouncings. Drawings by Augusta Reimer.

Dress Fashions Featuring Bordered Materials and Flouncings. Drawings by Augusta Reimer. The Ladies' Home Journal, March 1913. GGA Image ID #

Left to Right: 7472 Designed by Richard C. Pond; 7476 Designed by Virginia Walburn; 7478 Designed by Howard R. Moore; 7474 Designed by Richard C. Pond; 7480 Designed by Howard R. Moore; and 7482 Designed by Virginia Walburn.

By the use of embroidered flouncings, as shown in the white over the pink dress Design No. 7474, one can make a pretty lingerie dress at a reasonable cost and with little labor; and the fashion of wearing such a dress over a colored slip makes possible changes of costume without requiring a large wardrobe.

This dress is also suitable for bordered material, and it may be made with wrist-length sleeves if desired. The dress closes in the back, and the skirt is in three gores.

Design No. 7474 a charming design for bordered material, developed in a silk voile in delicate tan and pink coloring. A neck frill and a collar of white net, with a bow and a girdle of pink silk, give a touch of distinction that enhances the beauty of the dress.

A seven-gored skirt section is lengthened by a plaited flounce and finished with an over-skirt in four pieces. The dress closes in the back, and the sleeves are set into drop-shoulder armholes.

Decidedly girlish and pretty is the blue bordered dress Design No. 7478. The design illustrated here was made of a simple, bordered cotton voile, with most effective use of narrow black ribbon velvet, and worn over a guimpe of white net.

Though simple in design and development this dress is a most fortunate choice for the girl who cannot afford ‘"really best" clothes, for it can be used for many occasions and be in perfectly good taste. It closes in the back, and the skirt yoke is in five pieces.

A trifle more matronly in design, but equally good in taste and purpose, is the dress of bordered tan and violet silk voile Design No. 7482. This design may also be reproduced in embroidered flouncings and foulard and taffeta, and it will be especially attractive if made of wool challis, of which there is usually an excellent assortment. Good quality of wool challis washes like a handkerchief and is an excellent fabric for spring dresses. This dress closes in the back.

In the pretty white over green dress Design No. 7480, not only has the color green been used for the underslip, but it also has been most effectively introduced in the waist, the smart flat collar, the yoke buttons, and the girdle; as well as for a binding to outline the drop-shoulder cut of the armholes.

Bordered voiles, both of silk or cotton, and bordered taffetas and foulards will make up attractively in this design. If made of an embroidered flouncing, as pictured here, the yoke should be of tucked lawn or batiste, but if silk or wool is used, then chiffon would be in better taste. This dress closes in the back, and the skirt is straight gathered, with a two-piece yoke in tunic effect.

Many women pass by tempting bargains in flouncings of medium width, because they cannot see in these materials the successful development of a wearable and attractive dress, the material seeming only suitable for underwear or children’s clothes.

It was with this point in mind that the pretty dress Design No. 7472 was designed. The three section skirt lends itself admirably to these medium widths of flouncing, for it is a very simple matter to lengthen out the front panel with a plain material, covering the joining with insertion or beading if the length is necessary.

If a colored slip is desired for this or any other dress, a Princesse foundation or slip is an excellent style to select.

"Bordered Materials and Flouncings," in The Ladies' Home Journal,m Philadelphia: The Curtis Publishing Company, Volume XXX, No. 3, March 1913, p. 42.

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