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Titanic Disaster Coverage - Titanic Commutator - 4Q 2001

Front Cover, The Titanic Commutator, Volume 25, Number 154, Quarterly Journal

Front Cover (Above Right): The Great Gantries at Harland & Wolff that were designed for the Olympic-class liner. The secular history in Belfast at the time of Olympic and Titanic building, an overlooked aspect of the liners' story is put into perspective. A Fine Art Series postcard by Hurst & Co., Cornmarket, Belfast.

The secular history in Belfast at the time of Olympic and Titanic building, an overlooked aspect of the liners' story is put into perspective.

This issue features a profusely illustrated article on how the World Newspaper in New York got the story first on the RMS Titanic disaster. It details the journalism involved and provides a timeline of the telegraph news messages along with headlines from various papers around the country.

IN MEMORIAM SEPTEMBER 11, 2001

A picture of serenity in an earlier time—one of two towers completed at the new World Trade Center.

Several thousand people from 80 countries died in the attack. Our sincere thanks to our friends around the world who wrote telephoned and emailed their concern—messages of shock and condolences. We all were affected, but we are united. There will be some delays, and everyone will be patient. It took our enemy's savagery to remind us what some have forgotten.

We've been indoctrinated with the cult of multiculturalism - separate groups and told to abandon the melting pot that is America. We are not a multicultural nation; we are one nation, one people, regardless of color, creed, how long our families have been here or where they came from—and unique in the annals of human history.

In a time of war, it's easy to remember what binds us together; we are fighting to protect our freedom, to preserve our democracy, continue our way of life and to sustain our unity. America welcomes newcomers, and there has never been a time when it was more important to recommit ourselves to the concept of the melting pot.

The preservation and knowledge of history which is this Society's mission must be re-invigorated in our citizens as well as our newcomers—learning history in depth, so the foundations of democracy are understood. We turn our diversity into a strength by creating a collective identity from our various strands.

Like steel, an alloy of iron and carbon, we become stronger from the union of elements forging them into one. Moreover, if this lesson is not learned, it will not be terrorists who destroy us but ourselves.

CONTENTS

  • September 11, 2001, and the Titanic Disaster, excerpts from a column by Peggy Noonan
  • A Titanic Scoop: How the NY Evening World Got the Story First by James McGrath
  • Coaling Wharf No. 4 and Mackay-Bennet
  • No Home Rule by Paul Louden-Brown
  • Sea Poste & Features: Astor's Rolls Royce, Laroche, International Ice Patrol April Wreath Drop
  • Halifax 2001
  • Book Reviews
  • Captain Charles Bartlett: The Man Who Nearly Commanded Titanic? by Simon Mills
  • An Enterprising Lady on Carpathia Competes and Gets Her Titanic Story

 

Back Cover, The Titanic Commutator, Volume 25, Number 154, Quarterly Journal

Back Cover (Above): Carpathia arriving in New York by William Minshall Birchall (1884-c.1935), born in Iowa, he settled in England; primarily a watercolorist of fine marine studies, his illustrations weren't used by steamship company publicity departments whose ships he painted, thereby not as widely known. Nevertheless, his works in museums in the U.S. and Britain are well respected.

Publication Information

The Titanic Commutator
A Quarterly Journal Devoted To Original Research Into Ocean Liners.
Thirty-Eight Years Of Continuous Publication.
Volume 25, Number 154               2001

Published: October 2001
The Journal of Record of The Titanic Historical Society, Inc. — Published Quarterly Since 1963

THE TITANIC COMMUTATOR

Published quarterly and continuously for nearly forty years by The Titanic Historical Society, Inc., (ISSN 004-8182) and mailed from Springfield, Massachusetts, the journal has been the groundbreaker in providing primary source materials.

Accounts from Titanic passengers, biographies of White Star liners and other shipping companies are standard; also varied maritime interests, illustrations, and commentaries—ensuring a permanent record.

Sixty-four pages of exceptional content make this publication the largest and best of society journals whose excellence and accuracy is renowned.

Letters, email, advertising, articles, news items, and photographs are welcome. However, articles submitted must be exclusive to The Titanic Commutator.

No remuneration is made, and the Society cannot guarantee publication. General interest, veracity, and originality are the criteria; the burden for accuracy rests with the author, and the expressed opinions are not necessarily those of The Titanic Historical Society, Inc.

Note: We have made minor edits to this text to correct grammatical errors or to improve word choice to clarify the content. We replaced words written using a non-American variant with the American English spelling for consistency. The passive text was often left “as is.” Those who need to quote directly should verify any changes by reviewing the original material.


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