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BAIN-MARIE - Defined with Recipes Demonstration Utilization

BAIN-MARIE----A foreign culinary term for a hot water bath in which are kept the pots or saucepans containing sauces, garnitures, entrees, soups, etc., that require to be kept hot without reaching the boiling point.

A double kettle of any kind, the inner vessel surrounded by water, like a farina-kettle or glue-pot.

Recipes Utilzing a Bain-Marie

PORRIDGE—Proper name of "mush,” which is but a provincialism. Made of oatmeal, cornmeal, graham meal, fine hominy or grits, ground rice, farina, graham farina, cracked wheat, rolled oats, etc. Some of these need to be soaked in water for some hours before cooking. They arc all made into porridge by simply boiling in the requisite quantity of water, and best if in a double kettle or bain-marie.

FARINA—Pudding material made from wheat; it is like sifted corn-meal to the touch. There are two kinds, one being Graham farina, which is used principally for making mush or porridge for breakfast or supper; takes 3 oz. to a quart of water or milk; requires long cooking in a bain-marie or double kettle; pastry cooks let it simmer in milk for puddings at side of the range, then mix in sugar, butter and eggs, and bake.

Farina Custard Pudding—Made thin with farina boiled in milk, and thickened with sufficient yolks, sugar, butter, flavoring; baked; served with sauce. Boiled Farina Pudding— Made with 3 oz. in 1 qt. milk; simmered till thick, little sugar, butter, 2 yolks; served in saucers with thick lemon-syrup sauce.

Consommé with Farina—Soup first made clear; 1 oz. farina to each qt., washed, and simmered in it till transparent. Farina Cup Custard—Boiled custard, of 1 oz. to 1 qt. milk, well cooked in it, 4 yolks to each quart, sugar, flavor; made cold in ice water; served in cups. Farina Ice-Cream —Cup-custard frozen; it is also called Frozen Farina-Pudding.

ANDAYE BRANDY. An ounce of bruised aniseed, an ounce of bruised coriander seed, two ounces of powdered Florence iris, the zests of two oranges; put them with three quarts of distilled brandy into the alembic bain-marie; dissolve two pounds and a half of sugar in two pints and a half of clear river water, add them to the distilled liqueur, pass the whole through a strainer, and put into bottles.

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Vintage Culinary Terms - "B"