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What To Pack For Your Ocean Voyage

Fashionable Men Always Make a Great Entrance, Men's Wear Magazine, 22 June 1910.

Fashionable Men Always Make a Great Entrance, Men's Wear Magazine, 22 June 1910. GGA Image ID # 178feec59a

CLOTHING

Warm clothing and rugs should be taken for the ocean trip, as well as for the railway journeys in most European countries; even in winter the trains are seldom well heated, the primitive hot water can being very much in vogue. Occasionally trains will be found where some of the cars are heated by steam from the engine. At least one rug should be provided for each person.

Gentlemen should have at least two suits, as a change of clothing is sometimes necessary owing to the fact that decks are damp. It is also desirable to carry a dress suit for use on the steamer, as gentlemen dress for dinner on most of liners. Evening dress is not, however, obligatory.

Thick rubber-soled shoes will prove a great comfort on the voyage. Golf or soft felt hats should be worn by gentlemen at sea, and ladies wear tam-o'-shanters or similar head-gear with thick veils. Yachting caps are not worn at sea. Heavy underclothing should be provided for the voyage, and may be left in trunks in the storage warehouse.

Any article of clothing which may have been forgotten can be easily purchased abroad. English tailors are noted for the excellence of their material and workmanship, but the cut is not always adapted to our American ideas.

There will be little trouble, however, if a good tailor is selected. The dressmakers and milliners of Paris are, of course, famous throughout the world, and are referred to later on in this book.

Ladies will find it very desirable to take along an extremely portable workbox equipped with needles, thread, pins, hooks and eyes, buttons, etc., as these articles are not readily obtainable at sea, although one vessel has inaugurated a "department store" where all little necessaries can be purchased. Stewardesses usually carry needles, thread, pins, etc.

Bath slippers should be provided, as occasionally the distance to the bathrooms is quite considerable. A bathrobe should also be provided.

Serviceable Tub Dresses, Woman's Home Companion, July 1910.

Serviceable Tub Dresses, Woman's Home Companion, July 1910. GGA Image ID # 178f816541

Men will find that a heavy overcoat is needed even in summer, as the winds are apt to be very piercing. A lighter coat intended for use on arrival is also useful at sea. Ladies should have two cloth suits, flannel waists, one or more silk waists, and several shirt waists with necessary, changes of underclothing, etc., and if space permits, a gown for dinner and evening wear. An extra pair of shoes and a pair of rubbers should also be provided.

Those who are desirous of taking fur wraps should obtain a Custom House certificate before sailing, as otherwise duty will be levied on the return.

Advertisement for Regal Shoes for Men and Women, Effective Magazine Advertising, 1907.

Advertisement for Regal Shoes for Men and Women, Effective Magazine Advertising, 1907. GGA Image ID # 17bb743930

LADIES' LIST OF THINGS NOT TO BE FORGOTTEN:

  • Gowns
  • Underclothing
  • Bathrobe
  • Bath Slippers
  • Shirt Waists
  • Ulsters
  • Cap ( not a yachting cap )
  • Extra Shoes, and Rubbers
  • Umbrella
  • Rug
  • Steamer Chair Pillow

Modified Narrow Skirt Becoming Popular, The Delineator, February 1911.

Modified Narrow Skirt Becoming Popular, The Delineator, February 1911. GGA Image ID # 17d386f7bb

TOILET ARTICLES.

  • Brush
  • Hairpins
  • Tooth Brush
  • Tooth Powder
  • Cold Cream
  • Cologne
  • Powder
  • Pins
  • Safety Pins
  • Collar Buttons and Cuff Studs
  • Needles and Thread
  • Tape
  • Buttons
  • Hooks and Eyes
  • Manicure Articles
  • Fancy Work
  • Fountain Pen
  • Writing Material
  • Address Book
  • Hot Water Bag

GENTLEMEN'S LIST OF THINGS NOT TO BE FORGOTTEN:

Bramdegee Kincaid & Co Overcoat Models, Men's Wear Magazine, 6 July 1910.

Bramdegee Kincaid & Co Overcoat Models, Men's Wear Magazine, 6 July 1910. GGA Image ID # 178fb0f43e

  • Dress Suit
  • Dinner Coat
  • White Waistcoats
  • Dress Shirt
  • Dress Ties
  • Dress Collars
  • Cuffs
  • Cuff Studs
  • Shirt Studs
  • Patent Leather Shoes
  • Opera Hat
  • Silk Hat
  • Cane
  • Umbrella
  • White Gloves
  • Suspenders

FOR STEAMER

  • All papers, letters of credit, travelers' checks, visiting cards, keys, passport, medicines, etc.
  • Collars
  • Cuffs
  • Handkerchiefs
  • Studs
  • Cuff Buttons
  • Duplicate Prescriptions
  • Duplicate Eyeglasses
  • Duplicate Oculist's Prescriptions
  • Ties
  • Bow Ties
  • Shirts
  • Outing Shirts
  • Flannel Shirts
  • Suit
  • Suit Underwear
  • Pajamas
  • Duck Pants (Southern Trips)
  • Hose
  • Shoes
  • Rubber-soled Shoes
  • Bath Slippers
  • Bath Robe
  • Steamer Rug
  • Suspenders
  • Belt
  • Gloves
  • Cap
  • Shoestrings
  • Umbrella
  • Cane (?)
  • Brush Broom
  • Fountain Pen
  • Paper Cutter
  • Films

TOILET REQUISITES

Advertisement for Listerine Antiseptic Mouthwash and Tooth Paste, Good Housekeeping Magazine, June 1921.

Advertisement for Listerine Antiseptic Mouthwash and Tooth Paste, Good Housekeeping Magazine, June 1921. GGA Image ID # 17bbcdbb08

  • Hair Brush
  • Comb
  • Corkscrew
  • Tooth Brush
  • Tooth Powder
  • Mouth Wash
  • Nail Brush
  • Listerine or Borine
  • Pocket Knife
  • Shaving Soap
  • Shaving Brush
  • Safety Razor
  • Razor
  • Razor Strop
  • Sponge
  • Bay Rum
  • Violet Water
  • Lilac Water
  • Talcum Powder
  • Nail Clipper
  • Nail File
  • Medicines
  • Hot Water Bag

Medicine

Advertisement for a Kantleek Hot Water Bag, Good Housekeeping Magazine, October 1920.

Advertisement for a Kantleek Hot Water Bag, Good Housekeeping Magazine, October 1920. GGA Image ID # 17bc11021b

The following medicines, etc., should be carried:

  • One small hot water bag
  • One ounce arnica
  • Three Ounces extract of witch hazel
  • Two ounces aromatic spirits of ammonia
  • One menthol cone
  • One styptic pencil
  • One package court plaster
  • One narrow bandage
  • One small package of absorbent cotton
  • One can containing "new skin"
  • One bottle "Sun" cholera mixture
  • One bottle soda-mint tablets
  • One bottle bismuth and pepsin tablets
  • One bottle "Listerine;—boritte" or equivalent preparation

A bottle of Jamaica ginger (Brown's is good) will also obviate many of the little ills incidents to travel. Bicarbonate of soda tablets should also be carried to take care of slight attacks of indigestion.

If inclined to catarrh, take Dobell solution tablets and a Bermingham douche.  They will pack nicely in a small cracker tin. A little old linen, a few yards of stout thread wound around a stiff piece of paper should also be carried. 

Slight injuries to the hands often occur when getting in or out of railway carriages. Some travelers recommend a small bottle of spirits of camphor; Vaseline and cream may be carried with advantage.

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