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Titanic Images - Popular Mechanics

Popular Mechancis focuses on new developments in the field of science, mechanics, industry, invention and discovery — accurate facts accompanied by sharp photos showing the features.

Snapshot Taken by a Passenger on Board the RMS Carpathia Showing the Ice Field into Which the RMS Titanic Ran Causing the Greatest Marine Tragedy in History.

Snapshot Taken by a Passenger on Board the RMS Carpathia Showing the Ice Field into Which the RMS Titanic Ran Causing the Greatest Marine Tragedy in History. © 1912 Underwood & Underwood. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 797. GGA Image ID # 1080141eff

One of the Electrically Operated, Double-Cylinder, Watertight Doors

One of the Electrically Operated, Double-Cylinder, Watertight Doors in the Forward Bulkheads of the "Titanic," Which Were Closed from the Bridge. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 798. GGA Image ID # 1080a486c9

The RMS Titanic, When It Sank, Was in 41° 46 Min. N. Lat., 50° 14 Min. W. Long., Approximately the Same Latitude as New York and Madrid.

The RMS Titanic, When It Sank, Was in 41° 46 Min. N. Lat., 50° 14 Min. W. Long., Approximately the Same Latitude as New York and Madrid. The Distances of Other Vessels in the Vicinity from the Ill-Fated Ship at the Time She First Flashed Distress Signals Were: SS California, about 10 Miles; SS Mt. Temple, 20 Miles; SS Frankfort, 40 Miles; SS Carpathia, 58 Miles: SS Niagara, 75 Miles: SS Virginian, 120 Miles; SS Baltic, 100 Miles; And SS Olympic, about 250 Miles. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 799. GGA Image ID # 1080c2bc2d

How the Titanic, the Last Word in Marine Architecture, Was Crushed like an Egg Shell by the Submerged Portion of an Iceberg.

How the "Titanic," the "Last Word in Marine Architecture," Was Crushed like an Egg Shell by the Submerged Portion of an Iceberg. On the night of April 14th, the ' Titanic," steaming at almost full speed through the darkness and through an ice field of which she had been warned by wireless, struck an iceberg and, despite the most modern devices and mechanical precautions which had led her builders to believe she was unsinkable, went to the bottom of "Sigsbee Deep," carrying 1,635 souls to death. The above drawing was made from descriptions furnished by survivors, and by scores of witnesses who testified before the United States Senate investigating committee at Washington. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 800-801. GGA Image ID # 1080d6589a

The Titanic as She Left Southampton, Starting on Her First and Last Voyage.

The "Titanic" as She Left Southampton, Starting on Her First and Last Voyage. This Reproduction and That of the "Carpathia," Below, Are Made to Scale, Showing the Comparative Sizes of the Ships. © American Press Association. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 803-a. GGA Image ID # 1081375cf4

The Carpathia, the Rescue Ship That Picked up 705 Survivors

The "Carpathia," the Rescue Ship That Picked up 705 Survivors. © Underwood & Underwood. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 803-b. GGA Image ID # 10819126d6

Midship Section of the Titanic, Showing Single Skin above Double Bottom, and Absence of Longitudinal Bulkheads

Midship Section of the "Titanic," Showing Single Skin above Double Bottom, and Absence of Longitudinal Bulkheads. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 804-a. GGA Image ID # 10819412ed

Section of Large Liner with Longitudinal Bulkheads

Section of Large Liner with Longitudinal Bulkheads. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 804-b. GGA Image ID # 1081fb580b

Constructing the Double Bottom of the Titanic at the Harland & Wolff Yards

Constructing the Double Bottom of the "Titanic" at the Harland & Wolff Yards, Belfast, Ireland, Looking Aft. This Steel Bottom Was Torn by the Ice as Though It Had Been Paper. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 805-a. GGA Image ID # 10823fe2c5

The Arrival of the Carpathia in New York Harbor with Survivors of the Titanic

The Arrival of the "Carpathia," in New York Harbor, with Survivors of the "Titanic," Showing the Lifeboats of the Latter Slung from the Davits. This Photograph was Taken from a Tug, Hundreds of Pounds of Powder Being Used. © Underwood and Underwood. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 805-b. GGA Image ID # 108292d164

Boat-Deck Plan of the Titanic

Fig. 1—Boat-Deck Plan of the "Titanic," Showing How Lifeboats Were Located, 60 Feet above the Water. There Were 16 Large Boats, to Be Swung out by the Davits before Lowering, and Two Sea Boats, Already Swung out and Ready for Instant Use in Case of Man Overboard or Other Emergency. There Was Room for More Boats on This and Other Decks of the Liner. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 806-a & 807-a. GGA Image ID # 1082947e52

Broadside Elevation of the Vessel, Indicating Positions of Decks and Water Tight Bulkheads

Fig. 2— Broadside Elevation of the Vessel, Indicating Positions of Decks and Water Tight Bulkheads, Illustrating the Necessity of Carrying Bulkheads to Upper Decks, and Showing How Flooding of Compartments Forward of Boiler Rooms Would Bring the Head down so That Water Would Flow over Bulkheads into Other Compartments, Sinking Being Inevitable. The Titanic Was 882 Feet 6 Inches Long: 92 Feet 6 Inches Beam; 46,328 Tons Register and Had Accommodations for 3,500 People as Passengers and Crew. She Was the Largest and Most Luxurious Ocean Steamship Ever Built, with 11 Decks and 15 Watertight Bulkheads the Distance from the Bottom of Her Keel to the Top of the Captain's House Was 105 Feet 7 Inches. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 806-b & 807-b. GGA Image ID # 1082ea705f

The Ocean Passengers by John T. McCutcheon

The Ocean Passengers by John T. McCutcheon in the Chicago Tribune. The Men Who Used to Be First to Rush down to Have the Purser Assign Them Good Seats at the Tables Will Hereafter First Rush up and Have the Boat Steward Assign Them Their Seats in the Lifeboats. © 1912 by John T. McCutcheon. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 807-a. GGA Image ID # 108385a363

Travelers Insurance Company Ad (1912) Referencing the Titanic

Travelers Insurance Company Ad (1912) Referencing the Titanic. This Is the Rule of the Sea, so That on the Titanic, with Courageous Self-Sacrifice, the Men Stood Aside While the Women and Children Filled the Life Boats and Were Pulled Away from the Sinking Ship. Moral: Insure in the Travelers. Popular Mechanics Magazine (June 1912) p. 175 Advertising Section. GGA Image ID #

The Butt Memorial Bridge in Augusta, Georgia

The Butt Memorial Bridge in Augusta, Georgia with Insert of The Memorial Tablet and Massive Wreath of Lillies and Rhododendron Leaves. Popular Mechanics Magazine (July 1914) p. 10. GGA Image ID # 107fbbbe84

Memorial to the RMS Titanic's Wireless Operator, Jack Phillips

Memorial to the RMS Titanic's Wireless Operator, Jack Phillips. Popular Mechanics Magazine (August 1914) p. 231. GGA Image ID # 107fd4fcc6

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