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Saved From The Titanic (1912)

Titanic Movie: Saved From The Titanic (1912)

Premier Movie Poster for the Film "Saved from the Titanic," Starring Dorothy Gibson, a Titanic Disaster Survivor. GGA Image ID # 101043e431

The startling story of the world's greatest sea disaster is the sensation of the country. Miss Dorothy Gibson, a heroine of the shipwreck, and one of the most talked of survivors tells in this motion masterpiece of the enthralling tragedy, among icebergs.

Excellent mechanical and lighting effects, realistic scenes, perfect reproduction of the real history of the fateful trip, magnificently acted.

A heart-stirring tale of the sea's greatest tragedy depicted by an eye-witness.

The wireless, the lifeboats, the wreck, the return.

Year: 1912
Film: Saved from the Titanic
Director: Étienne Arnaud
Cast: Dorothy Gibson
Notes: Starring Titanic survivor Dorothy Gibson. A lost film.

It was a unique chance that led Miss Dorothy Gibson, of the Eclair Film Company, to take passage on the Titanic, when she had already been booked on the Hamburg-American line.

As told in these columns last week, she had a wonderful escape from the dread disaster; and so impressed were the Eclair producers with her story that they decided to bring out a drama entitled “Saved From the Titanic,” from Miss Gibson's own account, with that handsome young cinematic star playing the leading role.

Accordingly, the work was begun and finished with such remarkable celerity that on May 14, one month from the day of the great wreck, this dramatic film play will be released. In the pictures Miss Gibson is shown in the very garments in which she was rescued; a ship's wireless room, scenes on a naval vessel, and other actual details never before attempted are brought into the story to make the photographic drama one worthy its high origin.

The harassing details which might offend good taste are carefully omitted, but the story of the wreck, the love interest and the effects of the bitter calamity are all depicted. It was a terrible task which Miss Gibson took upon herself, a week after her rescue. Most people would have succumbed to the nervous strain, but like the actresses before the footlights, this star of the camera play stuck to her part and went over and over the bitter details, keeping a tight grip on her emotions.

A Scene from the Film "Saved from the Titanic," Released 14 May 1912.

A Scene from the Film "Saved from the Titanic," Released 14 May 1912. The Moving Picture News (4 May 1912) p. 27. GGA Image ID # 100f8d7cb2

The play in its story form is that of a young girl who is returning to New York to her parents, after her studies abroad. She is to meet her betrothed, a naval officer on one of Uncle Sam's battleships, and then they are to be married.

The dreadful wreck occurs, and she is given up for lost. At last, the wireless announces the daughter's rescue, and the bad news turns out to be good. Yet, even after the daring rescue and her return to shore, the girl is so overcome by the thoughts of her future husband being upon the sea as a navy man, that she begs him to give up the commission.

Her father comes to him, demands that he choose between the two—his marriage, or his navy life. The young man is in a bitter plight, but he sticks to his duty; to his bewilderment, the father declares that the answer had been expected and that such was the only patriotic and manly thing to do.

He calls in his charming daughter and blesses them in their union. It is a lovely story, and because of the national interest in Miss Gibson, whose rare beauty is seen to more advantage than ever, this film will be a sensation.

In Miss Gibson's support is a strong cast, among whom are Alex Francis, the father, Miss Stuart, the mother, Jack Adolfi, the ensign and William Dunn and Guy Oliver in strong characterizations.

The Eclair Company

Saved from the Titanic Film Poster for Its Premier on 14 May 1912

Saved from the Titanic Film Poster for Its Premier on 14 May 1912. The Moving Picture News (4 May 1912) p. 30. GGA Image ID # 100fa88157

Charles Jourjon, was head of the Eclair Film Company, which had thirty branches and agencies and auxiliary concerns in as many of the large capitals of the world.

The Eclair company claimed to be the pioneer in engaging dramatic stars for film production, Sarah Bernhardt being an example. Eclair companies in foreign countries are known by the letters "A.C.A.D.," that stands for "Cinematograph Association of Dramatic Artists." The name of this society was known in America as Leading Players of France.

His biggest piece of luck was in missing the "Titanic" upon which he had reservation. He missed the ill-fated boat and followed on the Savoia twelve hours later. It will be remembered that the Savoia assisted in the search for those who met with disaster.

Release of "Saved from the Titanic"

SAVED FROM THE TITANTIC
Eclair Release, May 16

The startling story of the world's greatest sea disaster is the sensation of the country. Miss Dorothy Gibson, a heroine of the shipwreck, and one of the most ta-ked of survivors, tells in this motion masterpiece of the enthralling tragedy, among icebergs. Wonderful mechanical and lighting effects, realistic scenes, perfect reproduction of the true history of the fateful trip, magnificently acted. A heart-stirring tale of the sea's greatest tragedy depicted by an eyewitness. # wireless, the lifeboats, the wreck, the return.

Review of "Saved from the Titanic"

There have been many ways in which “easy money” was secured, but I respectfully doff my “skypiece” to the Eclair bunch, for when it comes to pure unadulterated nerve and gall, they are in a class by themselves.

I saw their reel, “Saved from the Titanic,” and if ever the public “fell” for an imposition, they tumbled good and hard on that one. There is about as much “Titanic” in that picture as there is in the Ozark mountains.

Even the management of the Photo Play, where the reel attracted banner business, were deceived, and they placed a streamer across the front of their theatre, telling the people that one of the young ladies who was rescued from the Titanic would appear and tell her story.

And it was such a “bum” picture, Eclair, I am surprised that you would utilize such a serious thing as that great catastrophe to put out the studio production you did when you didn't have one single feature that was real or genuine about the Titanic.

It was the limit. If you intended to “fake” it all, you should have made it a good deception, but that reel was the positive limit, and the Photo Play came in for an awful “panning.” They (like the “dear people,”) were not wise to what you were slipping them.

Bibliography

Éclair, “Saved From The Titanic,” in The Moving Picture News: America’s Leading Cinematograph Weekly, New York: Cinematograph Publishing Company, Vol. V, No. 18, 4 May 1912, p. 27.

Robert Grau, The Theater of Science: A Volume of Progress and Achievement in the Motion Picture Industry, Broadway Publishing Company, New York, 1914, Chapter 9, Pages 180-183

Synopsis of “Saved from the Titanic,” In The Moving Picture News: America’s Leading Cinematograph Weekly, New York: The Cinematograph Publishing Company, Vol. V, No. 19, 11 May 1912, p.29.

Release of "Saved from the Titanic," in The Moving Picture News: America’s Leading Cinematograph Weekly, New York: The Cinematograph Publishing Company, Vol. V, No. 19, 11 May 1912, p.35.

Western Correspondent, Review of "Saved from the Titanic," in The Moving Picture News: America’s Leading Cinematograph Weekly, New York: The Cinematograph Publishing Company, Vol. V, No,. 24, 15 June 1912, p. 29.

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