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The Service for the RMS Titanic Victims - April 1912

The Crowd Outside St. Paul's at the Conclusion of the Titanic Memorial Service on 19 April 1912

The Crowd Outside St. Paul's at the Conclusion of the Titanic Memorial Service on 19 April 1912. The Illustrated London News (11 May 1912) p. 703. © L.N.A. GGA Image ID # 101f0406c4.

In the Hours of Strongest Feeling: The "Titanic" Service. Gathered to Show Sympathy with the Sorrow of Two Peoples: The Crowd outside St. Paul's at the Conclusion of the Memorial Service on April 19, 1912.

The special memorial service at St. Paul's on April 19 gave full proof of the truth of Archbishop Tait's words: "Always in their hours of strongest feeling men acknowledge that they need a church.”

In the choir sat the Lord Mayor: some members of the Cabinet, including Mr. Sydney Buxton, President of the Board of Trade: The United States Ambassador and other diplomatists and representatives of the White Star Line.

In the body of the cathedral, no seats had been reserved, and rich and pour sat together in the vast congregation, united in a common sorrow.

The altar, stripped of all ornament but the Cross and two tall candlesticks, was draped in black and white, and a black carpet covered the steps. The band, one hundred strong, from Kneller Hall, were seated in front of the choir.

The service was simple, but most moving and impressive, especially the rendering of the Dead March in "Saul."

Among the hymns were "Rock of Ages" and "Eternal Father, strong to save"—the well-known hymn “for those in peril on the sea."

A Crowd Equal to That Which Was Lost with the Ill-Fated White Star Liner Titanic

A Crowd Equal to That Which Was Lost with the Ill-Fated White Star Liner Titanic. The Illustrated London News (11 May 1912) p. 704-705. © Topical. GGA Image ID # 101fc2d5d0.

Crowd Equal to That Which Was Lost with the Ill-Fated White Star Liner: Sixteen Hundred and Thirty-Five People. the Number Reported Drowned in One of the Greatest of Maritime Disasters.

By the sinking of the liner "Titanic" after collision with an iceberg, sixteen hundred and thirty-five people were drowned. There were 705 survivors: 202 first-class passengers, 115 second-class, 178 third-class, 206 of the crew and 4 officers.

Such figures, informative as they are, do not convey at once the extent of the catastrophe: they transmit to the mind little more than a blurred impression of a considerable number.

This photograph represents of a crowd totaling exactly 1635, a crowd equal, that is to say, to the roll of those who perished.  It was taken on Tower Hill when Mr. Ben Tillett was speaking on a recent occasion.

It was Mr. Tillett whose signature appeared on an extraordinary document drawn up after the disaster by the executive of the Dock, Wharf and General Workers‘ Union, which is reported as saying: “We offer our strongest protest against the wanton and callous disregard of human life and the vicious class antagonism shown in the practical forbidding of the saving of the lives of the third-class passengers. 

The refusal to permit other than first-class passengers to be saved by the boats is a disgrace to our common civilization.”

It need not be said that there is in truth in the allegations thus made, and it is good to know that a number of Labor leaders have repudiated the document.

Funeral Procession of MR. Wallace Hartley of the RMS Titanic in Colne, Lancashire

Funeral Procession of Mr. Wallace Hartley of the RMS Titanic in Colne, Lancashire. The Illustrated London News (8 June 1912) p. 867. © Farringdon Photo Co. GGA Image ID # 101fe60747.

The Burial of the Heroic Bandmaster of the "Titanic": The Funeral Procession of Mr. Wallace Hartley, at Colne, Lancashire.

The remains of Mr. Wallace Hartley, the bandmaster of the liner “Titanic,” who, accompanied by his musicians, continued playing as the great vessel sank, were laid to rest on May 18 in his native town, Colne, Lancashire.

Some 30,000 people were present; and figuring in the funeral procession were the Corporation of CoIne, representatives of various institutions with which Mr. Hartley was associated, members of the East Lancashire Territorial Regiment, five brass bands, and many of the Lancashire County Constabulary, mounted and on foot. It will be  remembered that when Mr. Hartley's body was recovered from the sea, his music case was strapped to it.

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