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How To Ship An Automobile Abroad - 1908

Boxing an Automobile for Shipment on an Ocean Liner. The Scientific American Handbook of Travel, 1910.

Boxing an Automobile for Shipment on an Ocean Liner. The Scientific American Handbook of Travel, 1910. GGA Image ID # 1627b56510

Nothing could make a trip to Europe more attractive to the motorist than the pleasure of taking his own motorcar with him. Most men retreat before the unknown possibilities of entanglements that would result from the efforts to carry an automobile across the Atlantic, through foreign lands and home.

Enthusiasts will be glad to know that all the difficulties are ended. An enterprising New York firm of steamship agents have prepared a pamphlet giving straightforward directions for the various steps to be taken, and whoever follows the advice they give will find it as easy to take an automobile abroad and back as it is to make the trip across the Hudson.

Swinging a Touring Car on Board at Folkestone. The Scientific American Handbook of Travel, 1910.

Swinging a Touring Car on Board at Folkestone. The Scientific American Handbook of Travel, 1910. GGA Image ID # 1627f1c500

None of the transatlantic steamship lines carry automobiles uncrated; therefore, the first step taken by the shipping agents to facilitate the forwarding of automobiles was to arrange for the necessary boxing at the pier.

Carpenters exceptionally skilled in this sort of work build the boxes for the automobiles on the steamship pier, and tourists are thereby enabled to run their cars directly to the docks under their own motive power, thus avoiding the jolting that a vehicle receives while being carted across New York, besides saving the cost of such drayage, varying from $15 to $20.

Another convenience offered by this arrangement is the fact that the passenger may thereby use his automobile up to the day before sailing, as the car can be delivered in the morning to the carpenters, and is then immediately boxed and placed on the ship.

Crated Automobile Ready for the Cargo Hold of an Ocean Liner. The Scientific American Handbook of Travel, 1910.

Crated Automobile Ready for the Cargo Hold of an Ocean Liner. The Scientific American Handbook of Travel, 1910. GGA Image ID # 16283171b7

The crates or boxes are built in such a manner that they may be taken apart on arrival abroad and used again for the return shipment of the automobile, saving thereby the cost of a new box that is otherwise required.

This arrangement applies primarily to those passengers whose cars are returned from the same port where they were landed, as, when the automobile is returned from a different port, it may prove more economical to build a new crate rather than to strip the lumber of the old box from the port at which it is landed to the port whence the automobile is to be returned. The motorist has to pay these charges:

Boxing at the pier, custom-house service in New York, charge for lifting automobile into the steamer, ocean freight, charge for lifting automobile out of the ocean liner, unboxing of car, customhouse formalities at port of debarkation, storage of lumber (empty case), insurance of lumber (empty case), reshipping of lumber to another port if necessary, refund of duties paid, reboxing of car, ocean freight to New York, United States customs entry at New York.

The United States Treasury Department holds that, upon reimportation, a car previously exported is, under the rule, liable to duty at its full value if repairs amounting to more than ten percent, of its original value have been made while the ear was abroad. Under this ruling, it is quite immaterial whether the repairs were necessitated by accident or otherwise.

It is advisable, though not essential, to procure a passport. This is issued by the State Department at Washington, D. C, upon the payment of a fee of $1.

The roads in France are kept in splendid repair by a large force of caretakers. The Touring Club of France has a fund for the benefit of disabled road-makers, and it would be a graceful action to contribute to this fund.

If driving in a country where the rule is to keep to the right, remember to place the tail-lamp on the left side, and vice-versa.

It is essential to give complete information on the following.

items to procure licenses and "triptiques" (frontier pass) in France, and which is useful for similar purposes in Italy and Germany:

1. Kind of vehicle; automobile, motorcycle.
2. Maker:
3. Mark:
4. Model and date:
5. Style; touring-car, runabout (with top or hood); limousine, Landau, landaulet.
6. Number of car:
7. Color: body, chassis:
8. Number of wheels:
9. Make of tires:
10. Number of springs carrying body:
11. Number of seats:
12. Weight: lbs. __________ kilograms: ___________
13. Value: $
14. Mark of motor:
15. Number of motor:
16. Motive power; gasoline, alcohol, electricity.
17. Number of cylinders:
18. Horsepower:
19. Speed on level:

The Automobile Club of America. Fifty-fourth Street, west of Broadway, New York, has affiliations with the foreign touring clubs of Europe, with whom they also have reciprocal arrangements; such as the use of their clubhouse, the securing of "triptiques" (frontier pass).

The Secretary. Bureau of Tours. Mr. A. L. Westgard will give information about the above. The dues of the Automobile Club are $50 per year, initiation fee $1()0 for members residing within a radius of fifty miles of New York: $25 per year, initiation fee $50 for members living outside of a fifty-mile radius of New York.

In shipping an automobile, it is essential to give the following information:

• Passenger's Name.
• Per S. S ____________ sailing ______________
• Ship car to:
• Chauffeur's name:
• Make Bills of Lading in name of:
• Consign car to:
• Value of the car for U. S. Custom-house clearance: $
• Insure automobile against marine risk for: $
• The make of my car is:
• The motor number is:
• The chassis number is:
• The measurements of my car are, length: ____ width: ____ height: ____
• The weight of my ear is _____ lbs.
• If a foreign car, please fill in the following too:
• The ear was imported on S. S. ________________________
• Custom-house entry was effected by:
• Entry No:
• All charges are to be paid at:

Please state if the car is to be returned to the United States. In shipping automobiles that are boxed from inland points of the United States the same should be consigned. Passenger's name. Port of shipment.

It is imperative that a consular invoice is procured from the United States Consul at the port from which the automobile is returned to the United States.

"How to Ship an Automobile Abroad," in Harper's Weekly, New York: Harper & Brothers, Vol. LII, No. 2670, 22 February 1908, p. 30

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