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Port of Gibraltar

The Port of Gibraltar circa 1905.

The Port of Gibraltar circa 1905. GGA Image ID # 143f8d2ca8

Approach to Gibraltar (1911)

Nearing the Strait of Gibraltar, the vessel crossing the Atlantic first sights the bold cliff shores of Cape St. Vincent in the southwest corner of Portugal. Lighthouse and signal stations here are plainly seen. Some hours later the coast of Seville is reached, and the way lies along Spanish shores with martello towers, the old signal stations of the Moors, crowning every headland. Cadiz is sighted, a white town at the water’s edge. Cape Trafalgar is passed later, and after this, the town of Tarifa.

Across the mouth of the strait, the African coast now comes in sight with the bare rocky range of the Jebel Kebir running out to Cape Spartel, the northwestern point of Africa. The Spartel lighthouse on the extremity was erected at the cost of the Sultan of Morocco, and is maintained by the commercial nations of the world, the United States bearing its part of the expense of keeping this light burning at the entrance of the great sea highway.

The town of Tangier is conspicuous farther along the coast of the strait, a white drift about its harbor and up the rocky hills beyond. Some miles farther the Jebel Musa, the mountain of the Apes and the African Pillar of Hercules, rises opposite its mating pillar in Europe. Ceuta, a Spanish possession on the African shore, and the place of noted Spanish prisons, occupies the peninsula of Mt. Acho, marking on the south the eastern end of the strait.

The shores on the north of the Strait of Gibraltar are in striking contrast with the rocky and sterile heights of the African shores. The hills of the Spanish coast show green and gently sloping with green mountain ranges in the background. The Rock of Gibraltar is seen above the Spanish shores on the west of the Bay of Gibraltar, and as the last point of this is rounded, the Rock looms in sight across the Bay. On the west side of the Bay the Spanish town of Algeciras is seen.

The approach to Gibraltar from the Mediterranean is along the Spanish coast of Almeria, Grenada and Malaga. Cape de Grata or Point de Elena, on either side of Aimer Bay, makes the first land sighted. The mountains of the Sierra Nevada range fill in the background, with high rolling land down to the precipitous shores that are a marked feature of these shores of Spain. Gibraltar as seen from the Mediterranean lies out in its full length of rock peninsula in strong contrast to the low lands about it.

THE SPECIAL TENDER AT GIBRALTAR (1905)

A special tender of the North German Lloyd is in service in landing passengers from their steamers at Gibraltar.

Formerly passengers landing and embarking at Gibraltar were obliged to avail themselves of small steam-launches or rowboats, and the introduction of a special tender for passengers has contributed very materially to the greater comfort and safety of passengers at Gibraltar.

The small tender, which bears the name Grille, is built of wood, and with special reference to the local requirements at Gibraltar. Her length is 79 feet 8 inches; beam, 18 feet; and depth, 9 feet 10 inches.

A handsomely appointed cabin furnishes ample accommodation for passengers in bad weather.

The Special North German Lloyd Tender Grille used for Landing Passengers at Gibraltar.

The Special North German Lloyd Tender Grille used for Landing Passengers at Gibraltar. GGA Image ID # 145552c8bc

Her construction is very strong. The vessel has been fitted with all conveniences. The extensive deck is provided with benches at the railing, and its whole length covered with an awning. Amidships there are two deckhouses connected by a platform, from which passengers disembark and embark from the transatlantic steamer.

As protection against the rain a pleasant saloon is provided under deck, aft. The motive power consists in a compound engine of about 150 horsepower, giving a speed of about ten knots. Fare : One shilling each way.

The New Special Tender at Gibraltar (1900)

The Special North German Lloyd Tender "Undine" Upon Which Passengers Are Landed at the Port of Gibraltar. GGA Image ID #

A special tender has been built by the North German Lloyd for service in landing passengers from their steamers at Gibraltar. So far passengers landing and embarking at Gibraltar have been obliged to avail themselves of small steam-launches or rowboats, and the introduction of a special tender for passengers will contribute very materially to the greater comfort and safety of passengers at Gibraltar.

The small tender, which bears the name Undine, has been built of wood and with special reference to the local requirements at Gibraltar. Its length is 79 feet 8 inches; beam, 18 feet; and depth, 9 feet 10 inches.

A handsomely appointed cabin furnishes ample accommodation for passengers in bad weather. Its construction is a very strong o»e, and the vessel has been fitted with all conveniences.

The extensive deck is provided with benches at the railing, and its whole length covered with an awning. Amidships there are two deckhouses connected by a platform from which passengers disembark and embark from the transatlantic steamer.

As protection against the rain a pleasant saloon is provided under deck aft. The motive power consists in a compound engine of about 150 horse-power, giving a speed of about ten knots.

Bibliography

Presbrey, Frank, "Approach to Gibraltar," in Presbrey's Information Guide for Transatlantic Travelers, Seventh Edition, New York: Frank Presbrey Co., 1911: P. 48-49.

"The Special Tender at Gibraltar," in North German Lloyd Bulletin, New York: Oelrichs & Co., Vol. XIX, No. 1, January 1905, p. 9.

"The New Special Tender at Gibraltar," in North German Lloyd Bulletin, New York, Oelrichs & Co., Vol. X, No. 2, August 1900, p. 7.

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