SS Pennsylvania Ephemera Collection

All Digitized Ephemera for the SS Pennsylvania available at the GG Archives. Common items of ephemera in our maritime collection include passenger lists, brochures, event and entertainment programs, and other memorabilia produced for a voyage or ship.

GG Archives Poster For a Cabin Class Passenger List from the SS Pennsylvania of the American Line, Departing circa 1878 from Liverpool to Philadelphia, Commanded by Captain Thom. R. Harris.

c1878 SS Pennsylvania Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: American Line
  • Class of Passengers: Cabin Class
  • Date of Departure: circa 1878
  • Route: Liverpool to Philadelphia
  • Commander: Captain Thomas R. Harris.
1902-04-22 Passenger Manifest for the SS Pennsylvania

1902-04-22 SS Pennsylvania Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)
  • Class of Passengers: Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 22 April 1902
  • Route: New York to Hamburg via Plymouth and Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain H. Spltedt
1902-06-21 Passenger Manifest of SS Pennsylvania

1902-06-21 SS Pennsylvania Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)
  • Class of Passengers: Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 21 June 1902
  • Route: Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Plymouth
  • Commander: Captain H. Spliedt
Passenger Manifest, SS Pennsylvania, Hamburg America Line, November 1905

1905-11-11 SS Pennsylvania Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)
  • Class of Passengers: First and Second Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 11 November 1905
  • Route: Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Plymouth
  • Commander: Captain H. Knuth
Passenger Manifest, SS Pennsylvania, Hamburg America Line, August 1906

1906-08-04 SS Pennsylvania Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)
  • Class of Passengers: First and Second Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 4 August 1906
  • Route: Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Plymouth
  • Commander: Captain H. Knuth

 

Ephemera contained in the GG Archives collection represent the souvenirs provided to the passengers of each voyage. Many of these souvenir ephemeral items have disappeared over the years.

Our selection varies considerably by ship, and likely contains only a sampling of what was originally produced and printed by the steamship lines.

Bookmark pages you're researching and check back periodically for additions as we continue to digitize our extensive ephemera materials.

The Eighth Voyage of the SS Pennsylvania 1874

The SS Pennsylvania of the American Line (1873) 3,126 Tons, 360 Feet Long x 42 Feet Wide.

The SS Pennsylvania of the American Line (1873) 3,126 Tons, 360 Feet Long x 42 Feet Wide. GGA Image ID # 1674b77e00

As we steam up the Channel towards the harbor of Liverpool, I am reminded that the readers of the Intelligencer may be interested to hear some of the particulars of our voyage across the Atlantic on the Pennsylvania. As it draws near an end, we sigh almost to take leave of the good ship, good captain and pleasant fellow-travelers, which have made our thirteen days voyage a real delight.

This eighth trip of the Pennsylvania is of special interest, since it immediately follows that which is made memorable by the sudden and tragic late of Capt. Bradburn and his officers.

The pioneer ship of the American line was looked on with great distrust after her narrow escape from great peril, and in consequence of this feeling, our company of saloon passengers consists of only ten persons of all ages.

We are entire strangers for the tint few hours, as we steam gently down the river, hut when the gong summons us to dinner at six o'clock, and we sit down at table, common courtesy leads us immediately into conversation, and we soon find that we have common sympathies enough to form us into a pleasant social circle.

At the head of the table sits the captain, Thomas K. Harris, a native of Eastport, Maine, and a mariner of long experience. We immediately take note of him as a fine specimen of physical manhood, and as he welcomes us heartily, and promptly enters into pleasant converse, we had his social qualities are as fine as his physique. Courteous, affable, and simple, we recognize in him a worthy guardian in our ocean home.

The surgeon and purser are also present and help to unite our small company. An Italian gentleman, who has been twenty-five years a resident in our country, and has adopted it as his future home, is returning with his American wife and daughter to visit his native city of Trieste; an Englishman, with his wife and two interesting little children, who claim to be Americans, and Dr. R. H. Nassau, a Presbyterian missionary, returning to his labor among the negroes of Lower Guinea, make up, with our two selves, the entire list of cabin passengers.

We soon anchor, for the night is dark and stormy and we are soon at rest, spending our first night of steamship life on the Delaware. At the dawning of morning we move steadily down the river and soon are out on the billowy sea. We have dispatched a few final letters to our friends by the pilot, who now leaves us, and in the gray and gloomy morning fix ourselves in ship chairs and wraps to enjoy the sea.

But a paroxysm of sea sickness soon sends us utterly prostrated to our comfortable staterooms, which are ready to receive us. All regretful looking back at the vanishing past, all hope of future good, ail care for present surroundings, except those which promote rest, are lost, and your correspondent submits to the inevitable for a few hours.

Another day and the trouble is over, and nothing but a feeling of comfortable weakness makes the stateroom couch seem desirable, as we speed onward toward the sunrise country of our dreams. In the afternoon, the pulsations of the strong engine cease, and we seem to rest for a little season and then resume our onward course.

On inquiry for the cause of stoppage, we find that a steerage passenger was found dead in his bed this morning, and that his body has just been consigned to a grave in the vast and wandering waves. He was an Englishman, and with his wife was returning to his native land to claim a fortune of $12,000, which had fallen to his lot.

The widow must now go on alone upon her quest. Two more pleasant days pass, and then as darkness was clothing the deep, we observed the captain was making rapid preparations for a storm.

He quietly teils us that he thinks, from present indications, we shall have about three days foul weather, after which we may hope for pleasant breezes and tranquil seas. His cheerfulness and vigilance inspire confidence, and we hear the fierce winds whistle through the rigging, and mark without alarm the increasing violence of the waves, as they dash in splendid fury against the ship.

The morning of the 14th found us in that part of the sea known to navigators as "The roaring forties," and the storm-wind is blowing fiercely as ever from the northeast. We progress but slowly against the terrible head wind, and the furious waves seem like advancing mountains, which gather strength as they approach us, and then seem to hurl their wrathful force against the trembling ship.

During part of the night of the 14th the engine stops, and we lie submissively upon the sea till morning. Morning comes, but it seems vain to think of rising, and it appears the part of wisdom to lie still and await more tranquil times. Rumors reach our staterooms of falls and bruises, which have befallen the officers and stewards in the performance of their duties.

Towards evening, the violence of the wind abating, we venture to emerge from our staterooms and ascend to "Social Hall," upon the deck. The wind has changed to the southward, and we find the sea agitated by a double system of fierce waves, which seem to wrench the ship powerfully.

The captain and first officer were upon the bridge when an enormous wave from the southeast hurls itself against the ship, staves in a life boat, breaks down some fifteen feet of the railing, wrenching off the strong iron rods and tears a hole in the deck. It dashes over the bridge and knocks the captain down against the mate, who, seeing the swift destruction that was coming, had firmly grasped a strong iron stanchion.

The captain grasps the officer, and they are saved. The water pours down the hole in the deck, and some of the steerage passengers are deluged in their beds, but no one is seriously hurt. All feel this to have been a great peril and a signal deliverance. The storm is now over, and the morning of the 16th finds us again speeding over smiling seas toward the desired haven.

The rest of our voyage has been with favoring winds, and so great is our satisfaction, that we unite in a series of resolutions, prepared by Dr Nassau, embodying our thanks to, and appreciation of, Capt. Harris.

These, with a letter to the American Steamship Company (also written by Dr. Nassau.), commendatory of their staunch vessel, are read at our last breakfast, Fourth mo. 23, in Liverpool harbor before lauding.

The long line of the Liverpool docks is before us in the gray morning light, and, with a really homesick feeling of reluctance, ire say farewell to our beautiful ship and her officers and step on board the tug, which is waiting to land us in the great commercial city of Liverpool.

As we walk from the landing over devious ways to the Adelphi Hotel, we are strongly reminded of our American city of Boston, and can hardly realize that we are indeed in the greatest commercial city of merry England.

S. R. (European Correspondent), "The Eighth Voyage of the Pennsylvania," in Friends' Intelligencer, Philadelphia: John Comly, Publishing Agent, Vol. XXXI, No. 12, 16 May 1874, pp. 187-188.

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