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WW1 Photos: Naval History and Heritage Command - Navy Archives (NHHC)

Photographs and Other Images Sourced from the Naval History and Heritage Command - Navy Archives (NHHC). A part of a World War 1 Online Exhibit at the GG Archives.

American Expeditionary Force Troops Disembarking from the Transport Ship President Lincoln at Hoboken, c 1918.

American Expeditionary Force Troops Disembarking from the Transport Ship President Lincoln at Hoboken, c 1918. NHHC, NH # 60985. GGA Image ID # 1909df066c

USS Cassin (DD43) Being Repaired in England After Being Torpedoed by German Submarine U-61.

USS Cassin (DD43) Being Repaired in England After Being Torpedoed by German Submarine U-61. Operations Along the East Coast on Neutrality Patrol and Drills and Surveillance Patrol in the Caribbean Were Cassin's Employment Until April 1917, When She Was Immediately Prepared for Overseas Deployment. She Arrived at Queenstown, Ireland, 17 May, and Began Operations Which Called for Her to Rendezvous With American Troop Convoys at Sea and Escort Them to Ports in England and France. On 15 October, She Sighted the German Submarine U-61 About 20 Miles South of Mind Head, Ireland, and Pursued Her. At 1330, Cassin Was Struck in Her Port Side, Aft, by a Torpedo. One Man Was Killed, Nine Wounded, and Cassin, Her Rudder Blown off and Stern Extensively Damaged, Began to Circle. This Did Not Prevent Her, However, From Firing Four Rounds at the Submarine When She Spotted Its Conning Tower at 1430. The Submarine, Thus Discouraged From Further Attack, Submerged and Was Not Contacted Again. Through the Night, Cassin Was Guarded by an American and Two British Destroyers, and in the Morning, HMS Snowdrop Took Cassin in Tow for Queenstown. After Repairs There and at Newport, England, Cassin Returned to Escort Duty on 2 July 1918. NHHC NH # 55059. GGA Image ID # 190a231db4

USS Cassin (DD43) On Maneuvers c 1916.

USS Cassin (DD43) On Maneuvers c 1916. NHHC. GGA Image ID # 190a38a3b9

USS Cassin (DD43) Leaving Queenstown for Home, 1918.

USS Cassin (DD43) Leaving Queenstown for Home, 1918. NHHC. NH # 1380. The USS Cassin's War Service Received a Well-Deserved Honor on 12 and 13 December 1918, When She Was Chosen as One of the Escort Ships for the USS George Washington, Carrying President Woodrow Wilson into Brest, France, for His Attendance at the Versailles Peace Conference. The USS Cassin Returned to Boston, Mass., 3 January 1919. GGA Image ID # 190a5e7741

The USS Finland (ID-4543) In Harbor During World War One.

The USS Finland (ID-4543) In Harbor During World War One. On October 28, 1917, the USS Finland Was Torpedoed Only a Few Hours after Leaving Port. This Ship, like The Antilles, Was on Her Return Voyage and, Also like That Ship, Was Manned by a Civilian Crew. She Was Carrying the Survivors of The Antilles, Who, Suffering from the Effects of Their Recent Experiences with That Vessel, Stampeded and Rushed for the Boats, Taking with Them Some of the Lowest Elements of the USS Finland's Crew. the Officers and the Better Element of the Crew Drove the Men Back to Their Stations, and the Vessel Was Saved from Sinking. She Returned to Brest, Where She Anchored the next Morning. the Experience of These Two Ships Was Instrumental in Causing All Troop Transports to Be Manned by Regular Navy Personnel as Rapidly as It Could Be Done. NHHC. NH # 53905. GGA Image ID # 190ac53a94

LTJG Edouard V. M. Isaacs, USN, was Taken Prisoner After the Sinking of the USS President Lincoln, 31 May 1918.

LTJG Edouard V. M. Isaacs, USN, was Taken Prisoner After the Sinking of the USS President Lincoln, 31 May 1918. The Naval Transport, USS President Lincoln, Was Sunk by the German Submarine U-90, off the Isle of Sicily, on 31 May 1918. the USS President Lincoln Was Returning to the United States from Europe with Seven Hundred and Fifteen Persons (passengers and Ship's Company) on Board. Her Loss Was Three of Her Officers and Twenty-three of Her Crew. This Small Loss of Life Was Credited to the Thorough Discipline of the Ship's Company and the Excellent Seamanship of Her Commanding Officer, Captain Joseph Aloysious Gainard. GGA Image ID # 190b1ac894

Memorial Services at Gresend Bay, England for Victims of the USS President Lincoln Sinking Two Years Prior, 31 May 1920.

Memorial Services at Gresend Bay, England for Victims of the USS President Lincoln Sinking Two Years Prior, 31 May 1920. The USS President Lincoln had been Torpedoed and Sunk 1 June 1918 by the German Submarine U-90, 600 Miles off the French Coast. NHHC. NH # 2760. GGA Image ID # 190b1e8d1d

The USS President Lincoln (Formerly of the Hamburg-American Line) at Sea During World War I, ca 1918.

The USS President Lincoln (Formerly of the Hamburg-American Line) at Sea During World War I, ca 1918. NHHC NH # 080. GGA Image ID # 190b4ff224

Soldiers of the 505th Service Battalion, [African-American] Unit, On the Deck of the Transport Ship USS President Lincoln, ca 1917.

Soldiers of the 505th Service Battalion, [African-American] Unit, On the Deck of the Transport Ship USS President Lincoln, ca 1917. NHHC NH # 103273. GGA Image ID # 190b9a30e3

Transport Ship SS Antilles in French Port with Troops on Board, October 1917.

Transport Ship SS Antilles in French Port with Troops on Board, October 1917. The SS Antilles Was an American Passenger-cargo Ship Launched in 1906. Chartered by the US Army in 1917 for Use as a Troop Transport Ship, Antilles Was Sunk by a German U-boat on 17 October 1917, Resulting in the Loss of 67 Lives. At the Time of Its Destruction the Antilles Sinking Represented the Largest Single Greatest Loss of American Lives to That Point in World War I. NHHC NH # 57048. GGA Image ID # 190b9cf15e

Some of the Survivors from the Sinking of the SS Antilles in a Lifeboat, 17 October 1917.

Some of the Survivors from the Sinking of the SS Antilles in a Lifeboat, 17 October 1917. NHHC NH # 41744. GGA Image ID # 190bcdb38b

Survivors of the Sinking of the Transport Ship USS President Lincoln in Lifeboats.

Survivors of the Sinking of the Transport Ship USS President Lincoln in Lifeboats. NHHC NH # 103360. GGA Image ID # 190c03d8e6

Survivors of the Sinking of the USS Jacob Jones, 1918.

Survivors of the Sinking of the USS Jacob Jones, 1918. USS Jacob Jones was a Tucker-class destroyer built for the United States Navy prior to the American entry into World War I. The ship was the first U.S. Navy vessel named in honor of Jacob Jones. The USS Jacob Jones Was Sunk by U-53 off the Island of Scilly on December 6 1917. The Ship Was Struck by a Single Torpedo in a Starboard Fuel Tank, as the Stern Sank Her Depth Charges Exploded Dooming the Ship. The USS Jacob Jones Was the First US Destroyer Ever to Be Lost to Enemy Action and Went Down in 8 Minutes. NHHC NH # 92064. GGA Image ID # 190c3998bf

Workers in Brest, France Drydock Pose by the Damaged USS Finland Caused by a Torpedo.

Workers in Brest, France Drydock Pose by the Damaged USS Finland Caused by a Torpedo. NHHC NH # 53906. GGA Image ID # 190c40de97

King George V of England (Center Foreground, with Beard) Inspecting the American Troop Transport Finland's Armament at Liverpool during World War I.

King George V of England (Center Foreground, with Beard) Inspecting the American Troop Transport Finland's Armament at Liverpool during World War I. Standing by the King's Left Shoulder Is Lieutenant-Commander Stanton L. H. Hazard, USN, Who Commanded the Navy Gun Crews Onboard the Ship. The Gun at Left Appears to Be a 4/40. the USS Finland Was an Army Chartered Transport in 1917. Official US Navy Photograph, NH 53907. GGA Image ID # 190c916454

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