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WW1 Photos: Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War - 1920

Photographs and Other Images Sourced from the Book, Leslies Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. A part of the World War 1 Online Exhibit at the GG Archives.

Front Cover, Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920.

Front Cover, Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 182a89b4c0

It is a great satisfaction to have brought together in a single book this remarkable collection of historical photographs of the greatest war in all history. They are gems selected from thousands of official and private pictures taken during these five terrible years. Many of the photographers risked their lives in taking them.

Prominent among them are the exclusive pictures by LESLIE’S staff of war photographers and correspondents—including James H. Hare’s photographs from the Battlefields of France and Italy, Donald Thompson’s from Russia and Siberia, Lucian Swift Kirtland’s from the Russian fronts, and the famous flying pictures of Zinn. The field of vision stretches from the homeland to far-away Vladivostok.

General Pershing will Rank in History with the World’s Greatest Generals.

General Pershing will Rank in History with the World’s Greatest Generals. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1822d60b77

General Pershing on His Way to Hotel de Ville on the French Independence Day, 14 July 1918.

General Pershing on His Way to Hotel de Ville on the French Independence Day, 14 July 1918. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1823108f0f

General Pershing at the Tomb of Lafayette. Photo by International Film Service.

General Pershing at the Tomb of Lafayette. Photo by International Film Service. Though a man of few words, the American commander in France is a forceful speaker and evidently his sentiments have met with the approval of Marshal Joffre who stands directly in front of him and is applauding enthusiastically. Perhaps the occasion recalls to the Hero of the Marne the days of his own visit to America when he, and not the American general, laid wreaths on tombs and was the center of popular enthusiasm. This picture, however, is proof of the success of Joffre’s mission to America, for he came to ask that American troops be sent to France’s aid immediately, and here we see the United States commander-in-chief in France, while in his audience is a United States admiral who commands a large destroyer flotilla in European waters. Preserve this picture, which was taken on Independence Day, for it holds more than passing interest. The tomb of Lafayette is the most hallowed spot in Europe to Americans, the fame of Joffre will live for all time and it is within the realm of probability that the name of Pershing will be written with those of the world’s greatest soldiers. Scenes such as this are epochs in history. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1823201d0f

General Pershing Heading Down the Champs Elysées in Paris. Photo by International Film Service.

General Pershing Heading Down the Champs Elysées in Paris. Holding the Place of Honor in the Great Pageant. Whose Brilliancy Eclipsed All Previous State Occasions in France, General Pershing, at the Head of the American Contingent, Passed down the Champs Elysées. Everywhere Acclaimed by Crowds Delirious with Enthusiasm. Just behind the Commander-in-chief Rides His Standard-bearer, Holding Aloft Pershing's Personal Banner, Four White Stars on a Brilliant Red Field, Here Displayed for the First Time. Photo by International Film Service. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 18232878f8

General Pershing Decorating 78 Men from the 2nd Division with Distinguished Service Crosses.

General Pershing Decorating 78 Men from the 2nd Division with Distinguished Service Crosses. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 182352a07e

Marines Embarking on Transport Ship for Europe.

Marines Embarking on Transport Ship for Europe. Transports will probably be leaving the United States ports with the regularity of clockwork. However, no information regarding time or place of departure will be issued by the Government. For this reason, this picture must speak for themselves as far as “news” is concerned. Marines with full-service equipment are shown going up the gangplank. Photograph by James H. Hare. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 18239dd116

Marines on Transport Ship Waving Goodbye.

Marines on Transport Ship Waving Goodbye. The Farewells Have All Been Made and the Big Ship Is Ready to Start on Its Long Journey. the Rules and Plans of the Transport Service Require a Maximum of Comfort in a Minimum Amount of Pace for Each Soldier. Nothing Is Left to Chance or an Emergency. System Prevails on a Transport as in Every Other Branch of the Military Service. Particular Care Is Taken to Prevent the Carrying of Stowaways or Persons Who May Attempt to Pain Admission to the Ship as Spies or to Do Damage. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1824890250

Transport Carrying Marines to Europe Depart from Port.

Transport Carrying Marines to Europe Depart from Port. The Transport Shown Here Is About to Leave an American Port Carrying Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines. in the Crowd on the Pier Are Relatives and Friends, Many in Tears. So Quietly Is the Work of Transporting Troops Being Done That Many Large Bodies Have Been Moved without Any of the Details Having Been Learned by the Public. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1824ca05f5

Soldiers Embarking onto Transport Ship.

Soldiers Embarking onto Transport Ship. Here Are Uncle Sam's Infantrymen in Complete Marching Equipment Embarking on a Ship for Parts Unknown. While These Men Win Be Relieved of Regular Duty during the Voyage, They Must Follow This Routine: Reveille, 6 Am; Breakfast, 6:30; Sick Call, 7:15; Guard Mounting, 8:00; Inspection, 10:30; Dinner, 12 Noon.; Sick Call, 4:00 Pm; Inspection, 30 Minutes before Sunset; Supper, 5.00; Retreat, Sunset; Call to Quarters, 8:45; Taps 9: 00. in Addition, Every Man Is Put through Vigorous Exercise or Drill Daily. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1824cb6d23

One of Many Soldiers Saying Their Farewells.

One of Many Soldiers Saying Their Farewells. A Point Commented upon during the Great War Is the Courage and Smiles with Which Mothers, Wives, and Sweethearts of the Soldiers of the Many Armies Have Tent Their Dear Ones to the Front. American Women Are Keeping up the Record. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1824d25219

Parade in Paris on the Fourth of July.

Parade in Paris on the Fourth of July. Through Streets Crowded with Enthusiastic Civilians and Soldiers, a Battalion of American Soldiers Marched on Independence Day, While Bands Played the National Airs of the Allies. the Demonstration in Praise of Our Men Surpassed Anything of the Kind in the History of the City. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1824dd8e7f

 American Barracks in France. In long cantonments such as these seen above, the regulars and marines of the expeditionary force are quartered.

American Barracks in France. In Long Cantonments Such as These Seen above, the Regulars and Marines of the Expeditionary Force Are Quartered. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1824ea222f

United States Regulars in Paris.

United States Regulars in Paris. The Stars and Stripes Were Much in Evidence in Paris on July 4th, and the Two Flags Are Seen Here, One "Old Glory," the Other the Regimental Flag of the Men Who Participated in the Parade, Was Cheered by Crowds Who Echoed the Cry "Vive les Etats Unis!" Far into the Night. France Has Adopted the American Soldier and Holds Him Dear. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 182502fa7a

Distinguished Service Cross.

Distinguished Service Cross Authorized in 1918. Awarded by the President, or in His Name by the Commanding General of the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe. for Extraordinary Heroism against the Enemy, but Which Does Not Justify the Medal of Honor Award. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 182a0f5a60

Distinguished Service Medal.

The Distinguished Service Medal, Authorized in 1918, Is Presented by the President to Anyone Serving in Any Capacity with the Army, Who Has Distinguished Himself or Herself by Exceptionally Meritorious Service in a Duty of Great Responsibility. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1829d3ae00

A United States Battleship and Submarines Ready for Action.

A United States Battleship and Submarines Ready for Action. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1829c25e89

The United States Navy Ready for Emergency at Any Time.

The United States Navy Ready for Emergency at Any Time. The Scene of Activity above Gives a Glimpse of the Preparation That Has Fitted the Navy for the Important Part Which It Is to Play in the Great War. In the Picture Is Shown the Forward Deck of the USS Missouri during the Process of Loading Ammunition for the 12-inch Guns Which Constitute the Main Battery of the Ship. The USS Missouri, Which Is a Battleship of the Second Line, Has a Complement of 800 Men. on Every Kind of Vessel Likely to Be Involved in Sea Engagements the Most Thorough Preparation Has Been Made to Bring the Great Fighting Machines up to Their Highest Possible Points of Efficiency. With Magazines Filled and Expert Gunners in the Turrets, American Ships May Be Depended upon to Acquit Themselves with Honor. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1829646c91

14-Inch Guns Stand Ready to Enforce American Rights.

14-Inch Guns Stand Ready to Enforce American Rights. The United States Has in Commission Two Battleships Armed with 14-inch Guns. This Photograph Shows a Gun Turret on One of Them, the USS Arizona When in the Brooklyn Navy Yard Having Her Engines Repaired. the Heavy Guns of This Splendid Fighting Ship Are Arranged Three to a Turret, There Being Four Turrets. the Secondary Battery Consists of 22 Five-inch Guns and 10 Smaller Sites. The USS Arizona Has a Displacement of 31.400 Tons and a Speed of 21 Knots. The USS Pennsylvania Is a Sister Ship, Having Similar Equipment and Carrying the Same Complement, 1,002 Officers and Men. These Two Ships, the Newest in Our Nary, Are the Only Vessels We Have That Mount Anti-Aircraft Guns. These Are on Deck and Are of the Latest and Most Approved Pattern. Three New Battleships, the USS California, USS Mississippi, and USS Idaho Now under Construction Will Mount 16-inch Guns and Will Have Displacements of 39, 220 Tons Each. The USS Mississippi Was Launched in 1916. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1829599945

The Atlantic Fleet Returns Home.

The Atlantic Fleet Returns Home. The Grey Fighters of the Atlantic Fleet Reach Home. Ship for Ship; Man for Man. and Gun for Gun. This Long Line of Super-dreadnoughts and Other Battle Craft Is Second to None in the World. This Unusual Photograph of the Fleet as It Entered New York Harbor Was Made from an Airplane Flying over the Ships. Admiral Henry T. Mayo, Commander of the Atlantic Fleet, Was Then Made Commander-in-chief of the United States Fleet, Thus Giving Him the Command of the Pacific Fleet as Well as That of the Atlantic. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1829193905

Mess Time for The Soldiers of The Seas.

Mess Time for The Soldiers of The Seas. The American Troops to France Are Probably the Best Fed of the Soldiers of Any of the Belligerents. Virtually All the Supplies Are Sent from the United States. Thousands of Cases of Canned Goods and Sides of Beef Are Required Weekly to Supply the First Division to France. One of the Greatest Problems in Waging War against Germany Is That Involved Is in Maintaining the Open Waterway to France in Order to Carry Supplies to the Army and the Allied Countries. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1828ea9da8

Women Workers in Our Shipyards. Photograph by Horace E. Thomas.

Women Workers in Our Shipyards. Women Working in the Columbia River District Shipyards in the Northwest. Employers Have Found That Women Workers Are Not to Be Regarded Lightly and Hundreds Are Employed Regularly in the Most Arduous Work in the Yards and Machine Shops. in One Yard in Portland, Oregon, 15 Women Are Employed in the Block Department. The Women above Operate Metal Lathes for 8 Hours a Day. The Two in the Foreground Were Formerly Schoolteachers. The Machines Are More Easily Managed than Unruly Pupils. Photograph by Horace E. Thomas. GGA Image ID # 1828cbc8a7

Women Working at War Industries. Photograph by Horace E. Thomas.

Women Working at War Industries. (Left) Adjusting Ball Bearings, Made by Women Into Iron Pulleys for Ships. “Formerly I Believed This Was Work Only Men Could Do," Said One Employer. "Now I Know After Three Months’ Trial That Women’s Hands Instinctively Do the Right Thing. I Can Use Many Women in This Business.’' (Middle) Women Workers in Molten Metal Are to Be Found in Another Establishment. They Turn Out Wheels, Bridge Work and Castings. They Make the Sand Molds and Pour in the Hot Metal, as the Two Above, and Finish off the Castings When Cool. the Work Is No Harder Than Washing for a Big Family. (Right) Tamping a Mold. These Molds in Sand Must Be Absolutely Perfect or the Casting Is Useless. It Is Said That the Women Take Great Pains With Their Work and in Many Cases Are Faster and Attend to Work More Closely Than the Men. Many of the Women Were Formerly Engaged in Clerical Work. Photograph by Horace E. Thomas. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1828c33bea

New German Prisoners in The Woevre - 1918-09.

New German Prisoners in The Woevre, September 1918. On This September Morning in the Woevre the Prisoners Began to Come in Early in Good Sized Batches. Most of Them Were Found in Dugouts or Were Machine- Gunners, Left to Protect the German Rear, but They Couldn’t Yell “Kamerad” Quick Enough When the Yanks Were Upon Them. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1828332520

Brigadier General Douglas McArthur With Staff of Rainbow Division.

Brigadier General Douglas McArthur With Staff of Rainbow Division. Brigadier-General Douglas McArthur of the Rainbow Division and Staff Talking It Over While Waiting for the Patrols to Report on the Ground Ahead. During This Time the Line Received a Much-Needed Rest. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 18281d9b9f

They Remembered Me! – A Normal Rockwell Classic from the Great War.

They Remembered Me! – A Normal Rockwell Classic from the Great War. This Issue Covering "the War in Pictures" Includes a Cover Illustration of a Soldier Opening a Christmas Package "They Remembered Me!" by Norman Rockwell. The Painting Appeared on the Cover of Leslie's Published 22 December 1917. Articles Included "Three Big Whys" by C. W. Gilbert, Full-Page Photo Essays "War's Necessity Brings New Transportation" Featuring the New Hospital Train No.1., and "Halifax's Terrible Disaster." The Issue Included Many Word War 1 Coverage Pages From the News, Including Articles About Fighting on Multiple Fronts. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1827a33e70

Goodbye Mr. President.

Goodbye Mr. President. For the First Time in History a President of the United States Is Visiting Europe. on the Morning of December 4, Amid the Booming of Guns and the Dipping of Flags, the George Washington, Bearing the Presidential Party, Was Escorted Down New York Harbor by Five Destroyers of the Atlantic Torpedo Flotilla. Army Airplanes Hovered About the Steamer Performing Spectacular Feats. Beyond the Statue of Liberty the George Washington Passed a Transport Inbound From London, Her Decks Crowded With Homecoming American Troops. In His Parting Speech to Congress the President Said the Allied Governments Desired His Personal Counsel in the Interoperation and Application of the Bases of Peace Which He Had Formulated. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 18277c87ac

The Big Four at The Peace Conference.

“The Big Four” at the Peace Conference. Left to right, Premier Orlando, of Italy; Premier David Lloyd-George, of Great Britain; Premier Georges Clemenceau, of France; President Woodrow Wilson. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 18273c5aa0

America’s Delegation to Negotiate Peace.

America’s Delegation to Negotiate Peace. Here for the First and Last Time on Record the Entire Body of American Delegates to the Peace Conference at Paris Are Assembled in One Room, After Terminating Their Half Year of Strenuous Labors. In the Capitol at Washington an Historic Forensic Battle Is Now Waging Over the Work of These Experts. Probably No Body of American Statesmen and International Experts Was Ever Before Submitted to Such a Simultaneous Storm of Eulogium and Denunciation, as the Assemblage of Diplomats Pictured Above. Their Leader. President Wilson Admits That Their Work Is Imperfect but Holds That It Is the Best Obtainable in the Circumstances. Seated in Front Row, Left to Right, Are Colonel House, Secretary Lansing, President Wilson, Harry White and General Bliss. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 18272bab09

The Signing of the Peace Treaty at Versailles, 28 June 1919.

The Signing of the Peace Treaty at Versailles, 28 June 1919. Lloyd George, President Wilson, and Clemenceau at Left Center. German Delegates Right Center. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 182704124f

The Signing of the Peace Treaty at Versailles, 28 June 1919.

The Signing of the Peace Treaty at Versailles, 28 June 1919. The Signing of the Peace Treaty at Versailles on June 28th Formally Ended the Greatest War in the History of the World, and at the German Delegates Attached Their Signatures the Thoughts of Many Turned Back to the Days of 1871 When Bismarck Imposed His Stern Conditions on the French Delegates in the Same Hall. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1826f1547f

Soldiers Landing in Hoboken Heading to Train.

Soldiers Landing in Hoboken Heading to Train. Daily the Transports Land Our Returning Soldiers at One or More of the Great Ports of “Disembarkation.” Almost Daily Four or Five Thousand Veterans Land at Hoboken From One of the Great Ocean Liners and March Away to a Troop Train With Tin Hats Jangling Against Hobnailed Shoes. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1826c74fe7

Americans In Paris On the Parade of The Unconquered.

Americans In Paris On the Parade of The Unconquered. Only a Parade—What Does It Have to Do With War History? and Not Even a Parade of Conquerors; Just a Parade of Defiance. It Was Held While the Tide of German Invasion Was Still at Highwater Mark, July 4, 1918. Only a Few Hundred Troops Took Part in It. For the First Time in Four Years Paris Decorated With Flags as for a Victory, Crowds Cheered and Applauded and Tossed Flowers to the Marching Yanks and Poilus. It Was a Brilliant Stroke of Propaganda, This Parade of the Unconquered, and It Did Wonders in the Way of Raising the Morale of the Civilian Population. Which at That Time Was at Low Ebb. U. S. Forces Were Represented in the Parade by Troops Chosen From Two Regiments of U. S. Infantry, Two of U. S. Marines and One of Artillery. the Picture Shows Some of the Infantry Marching Down the Rechristened Avenue du President Wilson, Past the Reviewing Stand and the Statue of General Washington in the Place D'Iena. Lieutenant Cushing Selected This Symbolic Picture at the Request of Homer Croy, Leslie’s Correspondent and Editor of the Overseas Weekly. Photograph © Committee on Public Information. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 18266cb239

The Largest Crowd of Spectators in the World’s History Welcomes the 27th Division.

The Largest Crowd of Spectators in the World’s History Welcomes the 27th Division. The Men of the Old National Guard of New York, 20,000 Strong, Marched up Fifth Avenue on March 25, to Receive the Applause of a Grateful People for Their Heroic Part in the Late War. For Five Miles the Line of March Was Jammed With a Solid Muss of Humanity Which for Four Hours Watched the Khaki-Clad Column, LED by Major General John F. O’Ryan. It Was Estimated That Nearly 2,000,000 People Saw the Parade. In the Great Service Flag Which Preceded the Column of Troops There Were 1,942 Stars of Gold for the Men Lost in the Division's Thirty Engagements. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1825f9e262

When Pershing and Grant Led Their Men Through Washington.

When Pershing and Grant Led Their Men Through Washington. The Mighty 1st Division and “Pershing’s Own” Regiment Bringing the History of Our A. E. F. to a Glorious Dose in the Final Parade Down Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, Where Grant’s Victorious Veterans Marched 54 Years Ago. After Leading His Men Down the Avenue, General Pershing Joined Vice-President Marshall and the Other Official Reviewers at the White House Stand and Watched His Fighting Men March By. Photograph © French Illustrating. Leslie's Photographic Review of the Great War, 1920. GGA Image ID # 1825831681

 

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