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Camp Dix Pictorial Review - 20 March 1918

Content

p.1

  • COMING AND GOING

P.2

  • THE ARTILLERY HORSE BALKS AT NOTHING
  • ON THE RIGHT: EXTERIOR AND.INTERIOR VIEW OF CAMP DIX LIBRARY
  • DEPOT BRIGADE OFFICERS’ BALL IN K. of C. BUILDING

P.3
WITH THE COLORED ARTILLERY BOYS
1. Litter Drill.
2. Veterinary Class in YMCA No. 7.
3. 349th F. A. Band.
4. A Jersey Mosquito for the Kaiser.
5. Glee Club, 350th F. a.
6- 350th F. A. Band.
7. YMCA No. 7 at Night.

P.4

  • CAMP DIX’S ALLIED INSTRUCTORS

Experience is the best teacher— when coupled with ability to use it and impart the knowledge gained to others. In this war not the few but the million must know. Fortunate is the American Army to have the benefit of French and British experience so dearly bought by early experiments.
The Scotchman in the Tam-o’- Shanter carries a dirk in the top of his sock—the handle can be seen protruding. We wonder what the penalty would be if he should dress without the dirk. Possibly thirty days in trousers would be the worst possible penalty.

 

  • THE HOSTESS HOUSE

Is a place where good cheer and good food may always be found. Here we entertain Mother and Jenny when they call. It is a connecting link between home and camp.
In the picture is shown the Sun Parlor, where easy chairs and current magazines are generously provided. A ping-pong outfit is on a table, and Jeff Smith, the camp boxing’ instructor, is “at the bat.” His uppercut, they say, is somewhat different from his “ping-pong” down-cut.

  • ST. GEORGE’S CLUB HOUSE POINTVILLE

One of the many inviting club houses specially erected for soldiers in and around Camp Dix.

 

P. 5
And the tank ambled along, what it didn't climb it pushed down. Over hill and dale, over snow and ice, across sunken roads and trenches and through forests, the tank just kept going. Camp Dix now understands why the Huns also kept going when the tanks came.

P.6

BOO-HOO!
‘‘O, I bleed fast!
Death, thou art a guest long look’d for; I embrace
Thee and thy wounds: 0, my last minute comes!
Where’er I go, let me enjoy this grace
Freely to view my Annabella’s face.”

We may not admire the setting in which John Ford, the English dramatist placed the above verse; we do admire the thought. There is no use writing a thesis upon love. Every man worthwhile treasure in his heart and mind a mother, sister, wife or sweetheart and thereby is a better man and a better soldier.

This article is not addressed to the man. It is to the woman. At times one lingers around a telephone booth in camp waiting for his call. The open-front noiseless-proof booths compel one, whether he would or not, to listen to many a conversation. Judging from one end of the dialog, there is more than one girl, more than one mother and wife who causes her soldier boy unnecessary worry, simply because she is worried about him.

Such worry cannot be avoided—it is part of human nature, especially feminine nature—but the planting of another worry where only one grew before, that can largely be avoided.

Worry depresses the man who is trying to do his very best to become a soldier and bear the brunt and burden of a new and different life. When a man becomes an American soldier today, he joins the legion of heroes and the women he loves and who loves him should be a worthy auxiliary.

Her share of the burden is to cause him the least amount of needless annoyance. Few men appreciate a woman’s feelings and a woman should try to understand that fact.

On the other hand, few women realize the profound depths of a man’s love. “Men love and ride away, but women love al- way” is a saying much older than it is true, for Annabella’s face is always with him, more so when he remembers it wreathed in smiles and good cheer.

To quote just one recent telephone conversation: “Why should you worry about me? It worries me to know that you are continually worrying about me. Please remember that my heart is often in my throat when I think of leaving you behind; I have my duty to attend to, I write you just as often as I can find time and ring up every day or two, and I wish you would not worry so much!”  This is typical of more than one conversation.

The folks at home must keep their troubles to themselves. They must not thrust every petty triviality of home discord, troubles and “just nerves” upon their boys in camp. If all the women of America will be brave enough to keep their troubles at home their boys will fight harder for them and come home to them sooner.

Keep a stiff upper lip and have a smile in your voice when talking to Johnnie on the telephone and when you write him. Co-operate with the Government’s agencies, the YMCAs, and other organizations who are doing their level best to bring cheer into army life.

The best these agencies can do is small compared with what you women can do. Man follows the guidance of woman in matters of feeling and sentiment far more than he does any man or organization of men. In the things that cheer, and comfort don’t merely “do your bit,” do everything. Many fine women do, but others don’t. Which class are you in, fair lady?

 

MUDDLED THOUGHTS
E-E-E-EEE sings the fly stuck on molasses or tanglefoot! E-e-e-eee sing the motors of the autos stuck in the Camp Dix mud; e-e-e-eee high-pitched, desperate, ending in pitiable exhaustion—as the exhaust chokes with mud.1 Pitiable things we do not like to think about, but war is Krieg and facts must be faced and we certainly have faced the fact that the days of mud followed the reign of the Frost King.
Yes, it has been a muddy scandal and we don’t care to go to the bottom of it. It’s a long, deep way out Wrightstown way and we were hiking that way in hip boots on one of
these delightful spring mornings after a slight shower.

Jitneys did not bother us, and all was nice and serene until we came to No Man’s Land near the Base Hospital. Here within a space of two hundred feet we found a whole fleet floundered; two jitneys, one Dodge that simply could not dodge, an ambulance hors de combat (this was not a mule ambulance, although the driver felt like a jackass), a Sixty-six and an F.W.D.—the latter going on all fours, downward.

As we said, it was one of those rare mornings when every prospect pleased and only the mud was vile—and the drivers’ language. A few of the names of our truck and jitney drivers at one time were on the muster roll of St. Peter; they have now all been transferred.

Facilis descensus Avemo through Camp Dix mud. But every cloud has its silver lining. This is a training camp; any jitneur who can navigate the parade ground when soft, or the Pemberton - Wrightstown road, will find it easy to pilot one of Henry’s new tanks across any part of No Man’s Land in Flanders.

We are only slightly interested in the chemical composition of Camp Dix mud, but we have made an exhaustive research into its physical properties, its tensile strength and its adhesive qualities. As for its tensile strength, we have seen a bread truck stuck and two other trucks hitched to it with a log chain, the chain broke.

Last fall we tried to buy glue in Wrightstown, but the stores weren’t selling ice to the Eskimos or glue to people who could find it on the street. The adhesive quality of Camp Dix mud is far beyond that of Major’s cement or the General’s comment.

We don’t know all the General said about it, we do know what he did about it. He wrote history on it—or in it. He set the entire camp, including the new rookies, to work digging drainage ditches, building culverts, boardwalks and corduroy boulevards.

Now if Doctor Garfield or Doctor Hoover would only prescribe a talkless and coughless theatre audience.

 

 

ALL REVIEW ADVERTISEMENTS GUARANTEED
A New Service to the Men in Camp and Co-operation with Merchants Who Are Just and Fair in All Their Dealings

The publisher guarantees every merchant advertising in the columns of this publication to be a reputable concern, one who does not overcharge, and all goods are as represented. The publisher does not care to have any advertiser whose integrity
may in any way be questioned and has amply assured himself that every advertiser represented is a merchant of standing in the first place.
This is going a step further than usual. Some merchants have overcharged, others
have sold seconds as firsts; such merchants are not advertised in these pages.

We positively guarantee to make good any purchase made from one of our advertisers if it is misrepresented in any way or, if purchased from a local branch house, a higher price has been charged than prevails in their Philadelphia, Trenton or New York
stores.

We guarantee that their prices are fair and just, and on the average, no higher than the goods can be bought in the general retail market. We have fully satisfied ourselves that none of our advertisers will give us any occasion to be called upon to satisfy this
guarantee, but in case of any dissatisfaction, the guarantee is your full protection.

It must be remembered that bargain sales, where the merchant finds himself  overstocked with a certain kind of goods and wishes to sell out at a price below his cost plus overhead charges, or is cutting a line for advertising purposes, such instances are not to be considered as a basis of comparison for fair prices, and that our advertisers are not expected to meet such prices.

Again, there is a class of city merchants who regularly sell a number of well-known branded goods, such as bromo-seltzer, in a drug store, at a very low price as a “leader,” overcoming the loss on such featured lines by adding an extra profit to other lines.

We are not asking our advertisers to meet cut rates. We demand, however, that they in no case charge more than the standard advertised price for standard goods, plus war tax, if any.

Merchandising is the same everywhere; the capable merchant looks to a large trade at a fair profit. Review advertisers are in that class.

When you buy from an advertiser in the Review you are sure of a fair price, good service and satisfaction.
(Reprinted from February Issue)

JITNEYING BACK TO BARRACKS NEAR A COLD GRAY DAWN
p. 7

  • A PART OF THE K. of C. SECRETARIAL STAFF - Left to right : (Standing) Secretaries Wm. O’Neill Wm. Sullivan, and Daniel McCormack; (Seated) General Secretary James P. McGovern, Rev. Father John F. Walsh, Chaplain, and Secretaries Wm. J. Schnorbus and George Gibson
  • MISS MARGARET WILSON - The President’s daughter, standing on the
    steps of the Hostess House. From a Brownie Snapshot by Miss Johnson
  • Why are the headquarters of the Officers’ Training School enclosed by a barbed
    wire fence? One answer is: To keep the students from their Superintendent. In
    fact it was intended to be a guard house.
  • INTERIOR OF 303rd ENGINEERS HALL
  • A GROUP OF CAMP DIX YMCA SECRETARIES

 

p. 8-9

  • Company F of the 24th Engineers, Captain Cross, has the unique distinction of having a member from every state in the Union except two, Vermont and North Dakota being the unfortunate ones. It is a company of repair shop mechanics ranging from watchmakers to boilermakers, from a half-breed Cherokee Indian to a man born in Batavia, Java, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Italian, Bohemian, Dutch and Polish boys in this company will work and fight side by side for the Land of the Free.
  • THE 310TH INFANTRY BAND
  • A SQUAD OF ROOKIES REPAIRING AND DRAINING A MUD ROAD
  • ROOKIES LINED UP FOR THE “SHOT IN THE ARM”
  • QUARTET OF CO. B, 303RD ENGINEERS
  • COTS GETTING AN AIRING

 

P.10

  • P. O. OSTERHUS
    The watchful, kindly eye of Uncle Sam is on his boys in and out of Camp. The
    Community Service of the War Department Commission on Training Camp Activities
    is now so organized that it includes practically all the towns and communities in the
    vicinity of Camp In its supervision of recreation and welfare work for the boys of
    Dix in the towns of Burlington, Moorestown.

Mount Holly and Pemberton the Commission is represented by Mr. P. O. Osterhus, with headquarters in Mount Holly. Mr. Osterhus is well fitted both by training and ten years of experience in educational and social service work.

He is graduate of Augsburg at Minneapolis, completed professional teachers’ course at Valparaiso University and has taken graduate courses at the University of Wisconsin as well as at Columbia University.

  • AFTERNOON BOXING LESSONS IN K. of C. HALL
  • THE FIRST MEN TO ENROLL AT CAMP DIX, SEPT. 5, 1917
  • OUTDOOR BOXING LESSONS

 

Camp Dix One Mile Relay Team has to its credit the Army and Navy Championship, New York City, Jan. 23rd defeated Camp Meade in dual race Baltimore Feb. 23rd, defeated in dual race U. S. A. A. A. C. Philadelphia March 8th. Army and Navy Championship, Philadelphia March 9th.

  • B. S. Walton, Camp Athletic Director
  • Lt. Wm. Anderson
  • Lt. L. Howard
  • Lt. C. M. Finch
  • Lt. Wm. Kelly
  • Lt. O. C. Anderson
  • Lt. F. Mt. Pleasant
  • SETTING UP EXERCISES

 

P. 11 – ONLY A PHTOGRAPH (NO TEXT) AND ADS

 

P. 12

  • A COMPANY ASSEMBLED FOR THEIR 15-MINUTE DAILY SING
  • FOUR FIELD MESS SCENES OF MEN FROM CO. C, 26TH ENGINEERS, AT THE RIFLE RANGE
  • ROOKIES’ FIRST LINE-UP IN FRONT OF BARRACKS

 

P. 13
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR SCENES WHEN DIX WAS COLD
Bryant, writing his Thanatopsis, might have started it "He who in the love of the army holds, she speaks a various language.”
A glance at the intimate scenes on this page shows just a glimpse of how varied army life may be. If you are a member of the Officers’ Training School you sleep double-decker, for has not the psychological test proven your brain to be double-action.
You may be a sharp-shooter and a biscuit-shooter at the same time. Of course, if someone in your barrack hasn’t had them before, why it’s a measly shame.
For when your barrack is quarantined about the only thing to liven you up is a fire, and even then, you don’t care to hear the fire-call in the dead of night. A call that is always welcome is the call to mess, whether turkey or hash.
You lean, scrawny civilians, if you want to put on a few pounds join the army; ask any of us. A good hike or a brisk gallop—some appetite!

 

P.14

  • A STUDY IN TYPES
  • NOON TIME ON THE RIFLE RANGE
  • FUTURE DISPATCH BEARERS

P.15

  • BAND OF THE 59TH PIONEER REGIMENT – DELAWARE BOYS

P.16
GILLETTE AD

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