Browse The Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives Home Page

Velouté - Definition and Recipes

Definition: Veloutés differ from the purées, cullises (broths), and bisques in that their invariable thickening element is a velouté whose preparation is in harmony with the nature of the ingredients of the soup, these being either vegetables, poultry, game, fish, or shell-fish.

The Preparation of the Ordinary Velouté

Allow three and one-half oz. of white roux per quart of the diluent. This diluent should be ordinary consommé for a velouté of vegetables or herbs, chicken consommé for a poultry velouté, or very clear fish fumet for a fish or shell-fish velouté.  

Dissolve the roux stirring the sauce with a spatula or whisk, so as to avoid its burning at the bottom.

Add one oz. of table-salt, a pinch of nutmeg and white powdered pepper, together with one-quarter lb. of white mushroom parings, if these are handy.

Now boil and move to a corner of the fire to despumate slowly for one and a half hours.

Strain through muslin into a smaller saucepan, add one pint of stock, and despumate for another half hour.

Strain it again through a tammy or a sieve into a wide tureen and keep moving it with a spatula until it is quite cold.

The Apportionment of the Ingredients

In general, the quantities of each constituent are in the following proportion: Velouté, one-half; the purée of the substance which characterizes the soup, one-quarter; the consommé used to bring the soup to its proper consistence, one-quarter.

In respect of finishing ingredients, use, for thickening, the yolks of three eggs and one-fifth pint of cream per quart of soup.

Thus, for four quarts of poultry velouté we arrive at the following quantities: Poultry velouté, three pints; purée of fowl obtained from a cleaned and drawn hen weighing about three lbs., one quart; consommé for regulating consistence, one quart; liaise twelve yolks and four-fifths pint of cream.

Rules Relative to the Preparation of Velouté

If the velouté is to be of lettuce, chicory, celery, or mixed herbs, these ingredients are scalded for five minutes, drained, gently stewed in butter, and added to the prepared velouté in which their cooking is completed.

If carrots, turnips, onions, etc. are to be treated, finely mince them, stew them in butter without allowing them to acquire any color, and add them to the velouté.

If fowl be the base, cook it in the velouté.

This done, withdraw it, remove the meat, finely pound same, and add it to the velouté, which is then rubbed through tammy.

In the case of fish, the procedure is the same as for fowl.

For game, roast or sauté the selected piece, bone it, finely pound the meat, and combine the latter with the velouté, which should then be rubbed through tammy.

For shell-fish, cook these in a mirepoix, finely pound them together with the latter, add to the velouté, and pass the whole through tammy.

The Completing of Velouté

Having passed the soup through tammy, bring it to its proper degree of consistence with the necessary quantity of consommé, boil while stirring, and place in a bain-marie.

At the last moment, finish the soup with the liaison and two oz. of butter per quart of liquid.

Garnish for Velouté

In the case of vegetables: Chiffonade, fine printaniers or brunoises.

For fowl and game: The fillets of one or the other, poached and cut into small dice or in julienne-fashion; little quenelles made with the raw fillets, or either fowl or game royales.

For fish: Small dice or fine julienne of fish fillets poached in butter.

For shell-fish: Small dice of cooked shell-fish meat put aside for the purpose.

Remarks. -In certain circumstances these garnishes are increased by means of three tablespoonfuls of poached rice per quart of the soup.

Velouté Recipes

Velouté de Volaille

This is identical with ordinary Velouté, except that instead of having white veal stock for its liquor, it is diluted with white poultry stock. The mode of procedure and the time allowed for cooking is the same.

Fish Velouté

Velouté is the base of various fish sauces.  

Prepare it in precisely the same way as poultry velouté, but instead of using poultry stock, use very clear fish fumet, and let it despumate for twenty minutes only.

 P. 116
FROM World’s Fair Menu and Recipe Book 1915

Velouté Agnes Sorel

Prepare one and one-half pints of poultry velouté, keeping it somewhat thin.

Clean, wash, peel, and quickly pound eight oz. of fresh mushrooms

Rub through a fine sieve and add the resulting purée of raw mushrooms to the velouté.

 Bring the whole to the boil once or twice, and this done rub through tammy immediately.

Finish with the liaise and add butter when dishing up.

Garnish with one tablespoonful of a julienne of raw mushrooms tossed in butter, one tablespoonful of chicken fillets, and as much salted tongue, both of which should also be cut in julienne-fashion.

The liaison, per quart of the soup, should consist of the yolks of three eggs and one-sixth pint of cream, while the average quantity of butter should measure about two and one-half oz.

This soup may also be prepared as a cream.

Velouté de Blanchaille au Curry

Bear in mind that this soup ought to be made and served within the space of twenty minutes, for if it be left to stand for however short a time, it will most probably turn, despite every possible precaution.

Cook three oz. of finely chopped onion in butter without coloration, besprinkle with one-half teaspoon of curry, moisten with one and one-half pints of boiling water, add a faggot, a pinch of salt, a few sprigs of saffron (or a little of it powdered), and two oz. of Viennese bread.

Set to boil for ten minutes; this done add three-quarters lb. of fresh Blanchailles and cook over a brisk fire.

Rub through a hair-sieve, finish by means of a liaison consisting of the yolks of three eggs and one-fifth pint of cream and pour the whole into the soup-tureen over some dried slices of bread (buttered), over rice, or over some previously poached vermicelli. Serve at once.

VELOUTE CARMELITE

Prepare one and one-half pints of fish velouté, stew four oz. of fillets of sole and the same quantity of fillets of whiting in one and one-half oz. of butter and lemon juice.

Pound the fish, add it to the velouté, and rub through tammy.

Add the necessary quantity of consommé, heat the velouté, and finish it, when about to serve, with a liaison and butter.

Garnish with one tablespoonful of a julienne of poached fillets of sole and twelve small quenelles of smelt forcemeat.

This soup may also be prepared as a cream.

Veloute Aux Carottes, AKA Nivernaise

Cut into thin slices one lb. of the red part only of carrots, season with a pinch of table-salt and twice that amount of castor-sugar, and stew in one oz. of butter.

Add one pint of ordinary thin velouté and let the cooking of the carrots be completed therein. Rub through tammy, finish with one-half pint of white consommé, set to boil, and complete the preparation, when dishing up, with the liaison and butter.

Garnish with one and one-half tablespoonfuls of a fine brunoise of the red part of carrots.

This soup may also be prepared as a cream.

Velouté Comtesse

Prepare one pint of ordinary velouté, parboil one- and one-half lbs. of white asparagus, and put them into the velouté.

Complete the cooking gently. Rub through tammy, add one half pint of white consommé, heat, and finish the preparation when dishing up, with the liaison and butter.

Garnish with one tablespoonful of a lettuce chiffonade and twelve small white asparagus-heads wherefrom all leaves have been removed.

This soup may also be prepared as a cream.

Velouté Au Concombres, AKA Danoise

Peel, remove the seeds from, mince, and stew in butter one lb. of parboil cucumber.

Add this to one pint of ordinary velouté, which should have been prepared at the same time, and complete the cooking quickly. Rub through tammy, add the necessary quantity of white consommé, heat, and finish the preparation, when dishing up, with a liaison and butter in the usual quantities.

Garnish with small bread dice fried in butter.

This soup may also be prepared as a cream.

Velouté Cressoniere

After having slightly parboiled them, stew one lb. of very fresh watercress leaves in one and one-half oz. of butter, add them to one pint of ordinary velouté.

Set to simmer for seven or eight minutes, rub through tammy, add one and one-half

pints of ordinary white consommé, heat, and finish the preparation, when dishing up, with a liaison and butter.

Garnish with one oz. of watercress leaves parboiled for three minutes.

This soup may also be prepared as a cream.

Velouté Dame-Blanche

Prepare one and one-half pints of clear poultry velouté.

Also, finely pound ten or twelve well-washed sweet almonds, moisten them, little by little, with one-sixth pint of fresh water, and rub through a strong towel, twisting the latter to assist the process.

Add this almond milk to the velouté, and finish the latter, when dishing up, with the liaison and butter.

Garnish with one tablespoonful of the white of a chicken cut into small dice, and twelve small quenelles of chicken forcemeat (in the shape of pearls) poached just before dishing up.

Velouté D'Artois

Prepare one pint of ordinary velouté and mix therewith one-half pint of a purée of haricot beans. Rub through tammy; add one-half pint of white consommé; heat, and finish the whole, when dishing up, with the liaison and butter.

Garnish with two tablespoonfuls of an ordinary julienne and a pinch of chervil pluches.

This soup may also be prepared as a cream.

Velouté d'Éperlans

Prepare a thin panada with one pint of boiled milk and two and one-half oz. of crumbled bread. Season with a pinch of salt and a very small quantity of mignonette.

Also stew gently, in one oz. of butter, two tablespoonfuls of chopped onion, two and one-half oz. of fillets of smelt, one-half lb. of fillets of sole, or the meat of a dory, and the juice of the quarter of a lemon.

Add the fish, stewed in butter and pounded, to the panada, together with one-half pint of ordinary thin velouté.

Rub through tammy; heat; season with a very little cayenne, and finish the whole, when dishing up, with an ordinary liaison and one and one-half oz. of butter.

The velouté d’Eperlans should, like almost all fish veloutés, be prepared as quickly as possible, and at the last moment. The process should not last longer than thirty minutes, for, if there be any delay, the preparation will turn and lose its flavor.

Velouté d'Éperlans Joinville

Proceed in the matter of the base of the soup.

Finish the velouté with an ordinary liaison and one- and one-half oz. of shrimp butter.

Garnish with six crayfish tails, cut into four pieces, and one tablespoon of a short julienne of truffles and mushrooms.

Velouté d'Éperlans Princesse

The same as above, with twelve small quenelles of smelt forcemeat with crayfish butter, and one tablespoonful of very green asparagus-heads per quart of velouté.

Veloute aux Grenouilles, AKA Sicilienne

Prepare one and one-half pints of delicate and rather thin fish velouté.

Trim fifteen or twenty frogs' legs; toss them in butter without letting them acquire any color and set them to poach for ten minutes in two tablespoonfuls of white wine and the juice of a lemon.

 Pound them in a mortar; add the resulting purée to the velouté; set to simmer for seven or eight minutes and rub through tammy.

Heat the velouté, and finish it, when dishing up, with the ordinary liaison and three and one-half oz. of best butter.

Do not garnish this velouté.

This soup may also be prepared as a cream.

Velouté de Homard, AKA Cardinal

Prepare one and three-quarter pints of bisque de homard but substitute velouté for the thickening with rice.

Rub through tammy; heat, and complete, when dishing up, with two and one-half oz. of lobster butter and three-quarters oz. of red butter.

Garnish with two baba-molds of a royale of lobster, cut by means of a fancy-cutter in the shape of a cross.

Shell-fish veloutés do not admit of an egg-yolk liaison.

Velouté de Homard à Cleveland

Break up two small live lobsters or one medium-sized one, and prepare it a l'Américaine

Reserve a few slices of the meat for garnishing purposes.

Finely pound the rest with the shell; combine the purée with one quart of ordinary velouté prepared beforehand and add the lobster sauce.

Rub through a sieve, first, then through tammy; heat without allowing to boil; add the required quantity of consommé, and once more pass the whole through a strainer.

Complete, when dishing up, with three oz. of best butter.

Garnish with one-half tablespoonful of peeled tomato pulp, cut into dice and half-melted in butter, and the reserved slices of lobster cut into dice.

Velouté de Homard a L'Indienne

Prepare the lobster a l'Américaine as above, and flavor it with curry.

Preserve an enough quantity of meat from the tail to afford an abundant garnish.

For the rest of the process proceed exactly as the preceding recipe directs.

Garnish with the reserved meat cut into dice, and four tablespoons of rice à l'Indienne; send the latter to the table separately.

Velouté de Homard a L'Orientale

Prepare a medium-sized lobster after the manner directed in “Homard à la Newburg with raw lobster’” and season with curry.

Reserve a few slices of the meat of the tail for the garnish; finely pound the remaining portions and the shell; add the lobster sauce and combine the whole with one quart of ordinary velouté, kept somewhat light.

Rub through a sieve, first, then through tammy; heat the velouté without letting it boil; add the necessary quantity of consommé, and finish the preparation, when about to serve, with three oz. of butter.

Garnish with the reserved meat cut into dice, and two tablespoons of rice à l'Indienne, each grain of which should be kept distinct and separate.

Velouté de Homard au Paprika

Prepare a medium-sized lobster A l’Américaine, and, in addition to the usual ingredients of the preparation, include two concassed tomatoes and two roughly chopped onions.

Season with paprika.

For the rest of the operation, proceed exactly as directed under “Velouté à la Cleveland.”

Garnish with lobster meat cut into dice, two tablespoons of rice, and one tablespoon of pimentos cut into dice.

Velouté de Homard à la Persane

Proceed exactly as for “Velouté de Homard A l'Orientale.”

Garnish with lobster meat in dice, one tablespoon of pimentos in dice, and two tablespoons of pilaf rice, to which add a very little saffron.

Remarks relating to the Variation of these Veloutés.: By merely substituting an equivalent quantity of crayfish, shrimps, or crabs, for the lobster, the recipes dealing with veloutés of lobster, given above, may be applied to Veloutés of Crayfish, Shrimps, or Crabs.

Velouté aux Huitres

Prepare one quart of very delicate fish velouté, and bear in mind that the preparation must be made as speedily as possible

Add to the velouté the carefully collected liquor of the twenty-four oysters constituting the garnish, and complete, when about to serve, with a liaison and butter.

Garnish with four poached oysters (cleared of their beards) per each person.

Velouté Isoline

Prepare one quart of poultry velouté. Complete it, when dishing up, with an ordinary liaison and three oz. of crayfish butter.

Garnish with three tablespoons of Japanese pearls poached in white consommé.

Velouté Marie Louise

Prepare one pint of poultry velouté; mix therewith one-half pint of barley cream and rub through tammy.

Add one-half pint of white consommé and heat the velouté without letting it boil.

Finish it, when about to serve, with a liaison and butter.

Garnish with one and one-half tablespoonfuls of best macaroni, poached and cut into dice.

This soup may also be prepared as a cream.

Velouté Marie Stuart

Prepare a poultry velouté with barley cream, as above.

Finish it, when about to serve, with a liaison and butter.

Garnish with two tablespoonfuls of a brunoise, and the same quantity of fine pearl barley cooked in white consommé.

This soup may also be prepared as a cream.

Velouté au Pourpier

Proceed exactly as directed under “Velouté Cressonière" but substitute purslane for the watercress.

Velouté à la Sultane

Prepare one quart of poultry velouté. Finish it, when dishing up, with a liaison composed of the yolks of three eggs diluted with one-fifth pint of sweet-almond milk (made by pounding eighteen sweet almonds, mixing therewith one-fifth pint of water, and straining the whole through a twisted towel), and three oz. of pistachio butter. The velouté should be of a pale green shade.

Garnish with small crescents of chicken forcemeat prepared with crayfish butter, kept of a pink shade. These crescents should be laid, by means of a piping-bag, upon thin roundels of truffle, and poached in consommé.

This soup may also be prepared as a cream.

Cold Chicken Velouté for Suppers

The preparation of these veloutés requires the utmost care, but, as a rule, they are very much liked.

Prepare a white roux from one oz. of butter and one and one-sixth oz. of flour per quart of the moistening.

Dilute with some very strong clear consommé, thoroughly cleared of grease; boil, and despumate for one and one-half hours, adding meanwhile half as much consommé as served in the moistening of the velouté.

When the velouté is thoroughly despumated and entirely cleared of grease, strain it through a silk sieve, and add, per quart, one-quarter pint of very fresh thin cream.

Cool, stirring incessantly the while; once more strain the velouté through the sieve when it is cold, and, if necessary, add some of the consommé already used, in order to give the velouté the consistence of a thickened consommé.

Serve it in cups and see that it be sufficiently thin.

This velouté is usually served as it stands, but it allows of various additional condiments such as tomato and capsicum essences; crayfish, shrimp, or game creams. These creams or essences should be of consummate delicacy, and ought to lend only a very delicate flavor to the velouté.

Return to Top of Page

Epicurean Cooking Terms

Definitions, Usage, Recipes, Etc.

Copyright © 2000- Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives. All rights reserved. See Terms of Use.