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Liaison - Definition and Recipes

 

From: The Royal Cookery Book 1869


P 77 -  POSITION OF HANDS MIXING THE LIAISON

The different processes of thickening soups and sauces are called liaisons. Below are many recipes for the thickening known as liaison for use in soups, poulettes, fricassee of chicken, etc.

Liaison Recipes

Liaison à l'Allemande

The thickening known as Liaison a L’Allemande is composed of flour, diluted in water, milk, or broth, according to the nature of the dish for which it is required. It produces a yellowish-white colored sauce.

Mix the flour smooth, with one of the above-mentioned liquids;

Strain through the pointed strainer; then, with one hand, pour the liaison into the preparation requiring it, whilst stirring with the other.

Liaison au Roux

Roux itself is made of butter and flour.

Melt 1/2 lb. of butter; add 1 lb. of flour; mix well, and leave on a slow fire, stirring occasionally till it becomes of a light mahogany color.

When cool, it may be kept in the larder, ready for use.

The liaison is made by pouring the broth into the stewpan containing the roux, and stirring, till it boils.

It may be mixed with either hot or cold broth;

If mixed cold, stir over the fire till boiling;

If mixed hot, moisten with the broth, by degrees, and off the fire, to prevent lumping.

Liaison of Egg

This liaison is used for soups, poulettes, fricassee of chicken, etc.

The first care is to take the sauce off the fire two minutes before adding the liaison.

This partial cooling is absolutely necessary to prevent the eggs from curdling.

The liaison is made by mixing part of the sauce with the yolks of egg (previously beaten), in a basin; then, pouring into the remainder of the sauce, and stirring on the fire till near boiling.

Liaison of Blood

This is used with game or poultry; the blood should be added in the same way as the yolks of egg, in the preceding recipe.

Liaison of Butter

That quantity of cold butter which is added to soups and sauces when taken off the fire, before serving, constitutes what is called the liaison of butter.

Never add this fresh butter till the last minute: for, if boiled, the flavor is quite altered, and the butter lost.

Liaison of Butter and Cream

This liaison is mostly used for soups; it is made by mixing the cold butter and cream in the tureen; the soup is then poured in, and stirred, till the butter is melted.

For sauces and vegetables: pour the liaison into the stewpan containing them; stir, till well mixed; and serve.

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