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Gelato - Definition and Recipes

Whatever be the kind of ices required, they should always be prepared in advance; for none of these preparations can be made ready at a moment's notice. There are two distinct operations in the confection of ices: — (1) The making of the preparation. (2) The freezing and the molding of the preparation. I shall begin by dealing with the second operation, which remains the same for all ices, and is the essential part of the procedure.

PREPARATIONS FOR FRUIT ICES

  • The base of these preparations is a syrup of sugar at 32° (saccharometer), to which a purée of fruit, an essence, or a liqueur is added, which will give the ice its character.
  • All these preparations require lemon juice, the quantity of which varies according to the acidity of the fruit used, but which, even in the case of the tartest fruits, should not measure less than the amount that maybe extracted from a whole lemon per quart of the preparation.
  • Orange juice may also be used, more especially for red-fruit ices; while the juices of the orange and the lemons combined throw the flavor of the fruit under treatment into remarkable relief.
  • In the season the juices are extracted from fresh fruit, pressed and rubbed through tammy. When the season is over the preserved juice of fruit is used.
  • All red-fruit ices are improved, once they are set, by an addition of half pint of raw, fresh cream per quart of the preparation.

THE MAKING OF FRUIT ICE PREPARATIONS

  • These preparations are made in two ways as follows: Rub the fruit through a fine sieve, after having pounded it if its nature admits of it.
  • Dilute the purée with an equal quantity of cold sugar syrup at 32" (saccharometer) and add lemon juice in a quantity subject to the acidity of the treated fruit.
  • This mixture of ingredients should always be cold and should be tested with saccharometer (pèse-sirops). If the instrument marks more than the proper degree, dilute the preparation with a little water; if it marks less, add syrup until the required degree is reached.
  • Pound the fruit with an average quantity of ten oz. of sugar per lb.; but remember that this proportion may be modified either way, subject to the sweetness of the fruit used.
  • Rub the whole through a sieve; and then, to obtain the proper degree of strength adds the necessary quantity of filtered water.

LIQUEUR-ICE PREPARATIONS

  • These preparations are made by adding to the syrup or the cream which forms the base of the ice a given quantity of the selected liqueur, the latter being generally added when the preparation is cold.
  • The proportion of one-fifth pint of liqueur per quart of syrup may be taken as an average. Subject to the requirements this liqueur flavor may be intensified with strong tea for rum ices; with orange-rind for Curaçao-flavored ices, with fresh, crushed cherry stones for Kirsch ices, etc.
  • These preparations should always contain some lemon-juice, and their strength should reach the average degree indicated for fruit ices.

Ice Breaker No. 1:

Ice Breaker No. 1: For Hotel Keepers, Confectioners, Wine Merchants, Refreshment Rooms, Ship's Cabins, Butlers' Pantries, Etc.

Improved Ice Breaker No. 2, Open Frame

Improved Ice Breaker No. 2, Open Frame For Fish Merchants, Fishmongers, Fishing Smacks, Refreshment Contractors, Ice Cream Makers, Etc.

Ice Breaker No. 3 with Box Frame

Ice Breaker No. 3 with Box Frame

 

APRICOT ICE

  • Take one pint of fresh apricot purée, one pint of syrup, and the juice of two lemons.
  • The strength of the preparation should measure 18° or 19” (saccharometer).

 

BANANA ICE

  • Set one pint of pounded banana pulp to macerate for two hours in one pint of Maraschino-flavored syrup. Add the juice of three lemons and rub through a sieve.
  • This preparation should measure from 20° to 21°.

 

CHERRY ICE

  • Crush one pint of stoned cherries and pound their stones. Set the whole to macerate for one hour in one pint of syrup, flavored with Kirsch.
  • Rub through a sieve and add the juice of a half-lemon. The preparation should measure 21°.

GRAPE ICE

  • Add to one and one-half pints of the juice of sweet, pressed grapes the juice of three lemons and the necessary quantity of powdered sugar to bring the preparation to 20°. Rub the whole through a sieve.

LEMON ICE

  • Set the zests of three lemon peels to infuse for three hours in one pint of cold syrup.
  • Add the juice of four lemons and of two oranges and strain the whole. The preparation should measure 22°.

MELON ICE

  • Mix one pint of very ripe melon pulp with one pint of syrup, the juice of two oranges and one lemon, and one tablespoon of orange-flower water. Rub the whole through a sieve. The mixture should measure 22°.

ORANGE ICE

  • Throw the gests of the rinds of four oranges into one quart of boiling syrup. Let the whole cool; add the juice of four oranges and one lemon and rub it through a sieve. It should measure 21°.

PEACH ICE

  • Proceed as for Apricot Ice using wall peaches if possible.

PEAR ICE

  • Peel, core, and pound some fine William pears, with one lb. of powdered sugar per two-thirds lb. of the fruit; and add thereto the juice of two lemons per lb. of pears.
  • Rub the whole through a sieve and add enough filtered water to bring it to 22°.

 

PINE-APPLE ICE

  • Set to macerate for two hours one pint of grated or pounded skinned pine-apple in one pint of syrup. Rub the whole through a sieve, add the juice of one lemon and a few drops of Kirsch, and test the preparation, which should measure from 18° to 20°.

 

PLUM ICE

  • Proceed as for Apricot Ice, bringing the preparation to 20°.

 

RASPBERRY ICE

  • Proceed as for Strawberry Ice using the same quantities.

 

 

RED-CURRANT ICE

  • Mix one pint of red-currant juice with one pint of syrup. In view of the natural acidity of the fruit, lemon-juice may be dispensed with. The preparation should measure 20°.

 

STRAWBERRY ICE

  • Mix one pint of strawberry purée with one pint of syrup and add thereto the juice of two oranges and of two lemons. Or pound two lbs. of strawberries with one lb. of powdered sugar; add the juice of oranges and lemons as above; rub the whole through a sieve and add the necessary amount of filtered water to bring the preparation to 16° or 18°.

 

TANGERINE ICE

  • Throw the zests of the rinds of four tangerines into one- and one-half pints of boiling syrup. Let the whole cool; rub it through a sieve, and finish it with the juice of six tangerines, two oranges and one lemon. The preparation should measure 21°.

VIOLET ICE

  • Put half a lb. of cleaned violet petals into one and one-half pints of boiling syrup. Let them infuse for ten minutes; strain the whole through a sieve; let it cool and finish it with the juice of three lemons. The preparation should measure from 20° to 21”.

 

Illustrations from The Book of Ices 1857

Molds for These Designs Can Be Had of A. B. Marshall

Molds for These Designs Can Be Had of A. B. Marshall © 1885 The Book of Ices

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