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Cockie-Leekie - Defined and Recipe

Cockie-Leekie—Name given by the Scotch people for a soup in which a cock fowl and leeks form the principal ingredients.

There is a strong point of Scottish cookery which delights all visitors to Scotland—I allude to the excellence of the national soups of that country. Hotchpotch, cockie-leekie, barley broth, and hare soup have all found favor in the sight of English visitors.

They are all of them soups of "character," and not mere messes of stock, to which has been added a little flavor. As a rule, the soups served in English restaurants and hotels, and in many private houses as well, are simply one compound under different names, indeed the same soup "Julienne" is frequently sold under twelve separate designations.

COCKIE-LEEKIE SOUP—Young fowls (cocks or hens) washed, trussed and lightly roasted, then put into a white stock of veal or chicken with some white parts of shredded leeks, salt, and a few whole peppers; when the fowls are nearly done, they are taken up, the meat picked into shreds and placed into another saucepan with an equal quantity of fresh shredded leeks, the stock the fowls were boiled in being then strained over; this is then brought to the boil, skimmed, then simmered till the leeks are tender (about half an hour), seasoned with salt and pepper, then served.

Last Luncheon on the RMS Titanic

Made famous as being a featured item on the 14 April 1912 Luncheon Menu of the RMS Titanic. The first class menu for Titanic's last luncheon features cockie leekie soup and grilled mutton chops.

Cockie-Leekie Soup.

Skin a pheasant and cut it up into small pieces to make a soup stock. Cut up eight white leeks, parboil them for ten minutes, pour off the water, and add the stock by degrees.

Let it simmer for three hours, adding pepper and salt to taste. An allowance of two prunes to each guest should be dropped into this soup a quarter of an hour before serving. The leeks are said to be much better after frost has just touched them.

This soup may be made of beef but is best of fowl or pheasant.

COCK YLEEKIE, sb. Sc. Also written cocka-leekic, cockie leckie. Soup made of a cock or fowl boiled with leeks.

Sc. Cockylccky and Scotch collops soon reeked in the Bailie’s little parlor, Scott Waverity 1814) lxvi. Ayr. Here are fresh herrings, and here's cock-alcckic, Doswkm. Pott. Wks. (1810 44. cd. 1871. Lth. They were half pitattic soup and half cockic Icckic/ Stkathcsx Bhukbonny (ed. 1891) a.Sc. That's guid-lookin cockie-Iookie, Wilson Talts (1839) V. 144. Colloq Seeking the reeky Repast placed before him, ... he In ecstasy muttered, ‘By Jove, Cocky-leeky/ Barham Ingoidsby (cd. 1864); Bagman's Dog.

More Recipes for Cockle-Leekie Soup

Cockie-Leekie Soup (1882)

Skin a pheasant and cut it up into small pieces to make a soup stock. Cut up eight white leeks, parboil them for ten minutes, pour off the water, and add the stock by degrees. Let it simmer for three hours, adding pepper and salt to taste. An allowance of two prunes to each guest should be dropped into this soup a quarter of an hour before serving. The leeks arc said to be much better after they have been just touched by frost.

This soup may be made of beef but is best of fowl or pheasant.

Cockie-Leekie Soup (1886)

Put into an earthen pot a knuckle of veal, the same of ham, and a large chicken cut up with its liver and lights ; add live quarts of water, and the moment the soup begins to boil set it where it can only simmer ; add an onion, a head of celery, a carrot, a turnip, and two cloves; when the meat is cooked pour the bouillon into another casserole, skim, and strain it, and add eight small shallots peeled and cut in half; cook slowly. Meanwhile chop into dice the chicken and ham; keep hot in a little bouillon, and when the soup is ready to serve, put the meat into the soup tureen; pour over it the bouillon and shallots, and serve hot.

COCKIE-LEEKIE SOUP (1897)

Fry one finely chopped onion in some butter in a saucepan ; take the meats from a raw chicken, cut them into small dice, add them to the onion and fry slightly, dilute with two quarts of broth, then put in pepper, salt, allspice, four chopped tomatoes, a cup of parboiled rice, two potatoes cut up small, also a carrot the same; boil for one hour, then add a coffee-spoonful of Worcestershire sauce, three drops of tabasco, a pinch of powdered sugar, and a tablespoonful of chopped parsley; taste and serve.

Cockie-Leekie Soup (1901)

Cut up an old fowl and 1 lb. of gravy beef. Put it into an earthenware casserole and cover with 2 quarts of water; let it come to the boil very slowly, skim well, then add one carrot cut in small pieces, one small slice of turnip, the white part of six leeks cut into 1-inch lengths, and salt to taste ; let all simmer for 3 hours. Take out the fowl and beef, cut the white part of the fowl in neat pieces; put this into the soup, and serve in the casserole in which it was made.

Cockle-Leekie Soup (1907)

Singe, draw, and cut a tender fowl in small pieces; fry slightly brown in a stewpan, with two ounces of butter; drain off the butter, moisten with two quarts of beef-broth and a quart of water, and set to boil; with a skimmer transfer the chicken to another stewpan, and strain the broth over; cut in inch lengths then in quarters, and parboil the white part of two bunches of leeks; drain, add to the chicken, with salt, pepper, and a bunch of parsley, with aromatics ; cover, and allow the whole to boil slowly for fifty minutes; remove the parsley, skim off the fat, and serve.

COCKIE-LEEKIE (1919)

Put 2 tablespoons of butter in a saucepan, and when melted stir in, a spoonful at a time, 1 cup of pearl barley, taking ten minutes to add it all ; then cover with 8 cups of carrot or onion broth (or use water), and add 2 bay leaves, 1 onion with 4 cloves stuck in it, a bouquet of herbs and parsley, 1 stalk of celery, and let simmer for one hour and a half, then strain, reserving some of the barley. Prepare leeks by washing and cutting into 2-inch lengths (using some of the green), and slicing lengthwise, and add them to the soup; put in the barley and let cook twenty- five minutes and season with salt and pepper.

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