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Blancmange - Definition and Recipes

Blanc Mange

Blanc Mange © 1906 Table Talks' Illustrated Cook Book

Blancmange is a very simple dessert made with milk or cream, cornstarch, eggs and sugar usually set in a mold and served cold. Blanc Mange means a white mixture; but it is made in a variety of colors, like the Bavarian creams.

Blanc-Manges are generally made of a firmer texture than the foregoing creams, but may be greatly improved and made light by adding a part of whipped cream, or whites of eggs in the form of a meringue, to the mixture just before the cream thickens on ice, in the same way as for the Charlotte and Bavarian creams.

Definition: Blanc mangé—corrupt; of blancmanger; lit., white eating, made of animal jelly; spiced and sweetened with emulsion of almonds; served cold.

Definition 2: Blancmange Delmonico — sweet and bitter almonds, soaked in water, drained and pounded, made to almond milk, mixed with gelatin, sugar, vanilla and frozen.

Blanc Mange Mold

Observation: Blancmanges of all kinds, after heing turned into cups, should be allowed to stand long enough to become thoroughly chilled and set. Otherwise they will he too soft to hold their shape when unmolded, and you will think there is a mistake in the recipe. But if the blancmange is made stiffer, it is much less palatable. Blancmange should not he tough and rubbery, but should be of a jellylike consistency.

Serving Suggestion: The cold sweet entremets come after the hot and are composed of Jellies, bavarois, creams, blancmanges, macédoines, charlottes and large cakes, and form another course of the meal. This part of the menu is certainly the prettiest and most coquettish, and with these luxuries ends the selection of dishes from which an elegant table may be set.

Alternative Spellings: Blanc-Mange, Blanc-Mangé, Blancmangé, and Blancmanger

Basic Blancmange Recipes

Blancmange #1

Milk put to boil, containing sugar, grated orange rind, and a few bitter almonds; when boiled, strain into another saucepan, boiled up again, then thickened with corn starch, and poured into molds, the bottoms and sides of which may be decorated with crystallized fruits.

After the blancmange is made it may be made into "ribbon cream" by separating it into four vessels, coloring one green and flavoring it with pistachios, another red with a rose flavor, another with some boiling chocolate; when filling the molds, the white is placed first and the chocolate last.

Blancemange #2

Heat over the fire (be sure not to let boil) two quarts milk, one quart cream; add three ounces gelatine and eighteen ounces sugar. Stir until gelatine is dissolved.

Remove, strain; stir on ice until it thickens. Flavor either with almond, rosewater, maraschino or vanilla. Pour into wetted molds and set in ice box.

When firm turn out on saucers and serve with sweetened cream, or clear fruit jelly may he piped around it.

Good Common Blancmange

Infuse for an hour in a pint and a half of new milk the very thin rind of one small, or of half a large lemon and four or five bitter almonds, blanched and bruised,* then add two ounces of sugar, or rather more for persons who like the blanc-mange very sweet, and an ounce and a half of isinglass.

Boil them gently over a clear fire, stirring them often until this last is dissolved; take off the scum, stir in half a pint, or rather more, of rich cream, and strain the blanc-mange into a bowl; it should be moved gently with a spoon until nearly cold to prevent the cream from settling on the surface. Before it is molded, mix with it by degrees a wineglassful of brandy.

New milk, 1 1/2 pint; rind of lemon, 1/2 large or whole small; bitter almonds, 8; infuse 1 hour. Sugar, 2 to 3 oz.; isinglass, 1 1/2 oz.: 10 minutes. Cream, 1/2 pint; brandy, 1 wineglassful.

* These should always be very sparingly used.

Richer Common Blancmange

A pint of good cream with a pint of new milk, sweetened and flavored as above (or in any other manner which good taste may dictate), with a little added sugar, and the same proportion of isinglass, will make particularly good blancmange. Two ounces of Jordan almonds may be pounded and mixed with it, but they are not needed with the cream.

Recipes for Blancmange in Different Flavors (A-Z)

Almond Blancmange

  • Heat a quart of milk in a double boiler with a pinch of salt and thicken with one-fourth cup of cornstarch rubbed smooth in a little cold milk,
  • Add the yolks of three eggs beaten with one-fourth cup of sugar, take from the fire, add a teaspoon of vanilla, half a pound of blanched and chopped almonds, and the stiffly beaten whites of the eggs.
  • Mold, chill, and serve with Fruit Sauce.

Almond Blancmange—II

  • Sweeten a quart of boiling cream to taste, flavor with almond extract, and add a few peeled, blanched, and shredded almonds.
  • Add half a package of gelatin which has been soaked and dissolved
  • Tint pink with color paste
  • Mold, chill, and serve.

Almond Blancmange—III

  • Heat a quart of milk in a double boiler, sweeten to taste
  • Thicken with the well beaten yolks of four eggs
  • Add half a package of gelatin which has been soaked and dissolved, and half a cup of almond paste.
  • Mix thoroughly
  • Mold, chill, and serve with whipped cream.

Almond Blancmange—IV

  • Blanch and pound a cup of almonds, add six cups of cream scalded with ten tablespoons of sugar, and a few drops of almond extract
  • Add a package of gelatin which has been soaked and dissolved
  • Mold, chill, and serve with whipped cream.

Arrowroot Blancmange-I

  • Beat together four tablespoons each of arrow root and sugar, four eggs, and a teaspoon of vanilla
  • Add gradually a quart of boiling milk
  • Stir until it thickens
  • Mold, chill, and serve with whipped cream.

Arrowroot Blancmange-II

  • 2 1/2 cups milk
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 4 tablespoons arrowroot
  • A few grains salt

Heat two cups of the milk, with the sugar and salt, to boiling. Stir in the arrowroot rubbed smooth with one-half cup milk, and cook till thickened, then pour into cups wet with cold water. When thoroughly cold, remove from the cups, and serve with cream, or with fruit juice or a fruit sauce.

Plumbe's Arrowroot Blancmange

Take one quart of milk, and mix with it four ounces, or four tablespoons, of arrowroot, flavor to taste, and boil the whole for four minutes, stirring all the time. Allow the blancmange to cool in a mold, and send milk and jelly, or milk and sugar, to table with it.

Plnmbe's (H. M.) Arrowroot. This arrowroot was first introduced into this country by John Williams, the well-known missionary to the South Sea Islands. It is very suitable for breakfast, luncheon, dinner, supper, etc., and can be made into tempting puddings, custards, jellies, and such like articles as blancmange. For children's food it is excellent.

Banana Blancmange

  • Heat a quart of milk in a double boiler with one fourth cup of sugar and thicken with four tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little cold milk.
  • When partially cool, add two sliced bananas and a teaspoonful of vanilla.
  • Mold, chill, and serve with whipped cream or boiled custard.

 

Chocolate Blancmange—I

  • Heat in a double boiler two cups of milk, half a cup of granulated sugar, and a teaspoon of vanilla.
  • Mix three tablespoons of grated chocolate with one tablespoon of cornstarch and rub

smooth with a little cold water.

  • Stir into the boiling milk and cook for ten minutes, stirring constantly.
  • Mold, chill, and serve with whipped cream.

Chocolate Blancmange—II

  • Cook to a smooth paste four tablespoons each of grated chocolate and sugar with two tablespoons of boiling water.
  • Add three cups of boiling milk with a pinch of salt and thicken with

four tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little cold milk.

  • Take from the fire, add a few drops of vanilla.
  • Mold, chill, and serve with whipped cream sweetened and flavored with vanilla.

Chocolate Blancmange—III

  • Heat three cups of milk with three tablespoons of sugar, flavor with vanilla, and thicken with three tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth in a little cold milk.
  • Divide and add to half of it a square of bitter chocolate grated and cook  to a smooth paste with three tablespoons of sugar and a little water.
  • Simmer until thoroughly mixed, and mold in alternate layers.
  • Chill and serve with whipped cream.

Chocolate Blancmange—IV

  • Heat a quart of milk in a double boiler with three tablespoons of grated chocolate and half a cup of sugar.
  • Thicken with four tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little cold milk

and a few drops of vanilla.

  • Serve cold with cream.

Chocolate Blancmange—V

  • Grate half a cake of bitter chocolate and cook with a quart of milk in a double boiler until thoroughly mixed.
  • Thicken with four teaspoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little cold milk and

cook until smooth and thick, stirring constantly.

  • Take from the fire, add the yolks of three eggs beaten with one and one-half cups of sugar and vanilla to flavor.
  • Turn into a serving-dish, cover with a meringue made of the beaten whites and three tablespoons of powdered sugar, and return to the oven until puffed and brown.
  • Serve cold.

Chocolate Blancmange—VI

  • Heat a quart of milk in a double boiler with a pinch of salt and four tablespoons of sugar.
  • Add two squares of bitter chocolate, and thicken with four tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little cold milk.
  • Take from the fire, add four eggs well-beaten and a teaspoonful of vanilla.
  • Mold, chill, and serve with cream. Half of this recipe is sufficient for a small family.

Chocolate Blancmange—VII

  • Heat two cups of milk in a double boiler, add half a cup of grated chocolate rubbed smooth in a little cold milk, and one cupful of sugar
  • Cook until smooth and thick, stirring constantly
  • Take from the fire, add half a package of gelatin which has been soaked and dissolved
  • And when cool but not set, add a few drops of vanilla and the stiffly beaten whites of three eggs
  • Mold, chill, and serve with whipped cream sweetened to taste and flavored with vanilla, or with a boiled custard made of the yolks.

Chocolate Blancmange—VIII

  • Grate two squares of bitter chocolate and cook to a smooth paste in a little water.
  • Heat six cups of milk in a double boiler with a pinch of salt, six tablespoons of sugar, and a teaspoonful of vanilla
  • Add the chocolate, and cook until smooth and thick, stirring constantly
  • Take from the fire, add a package of gelatin which has been soaked and dissolved
  • Mold, chill, and serve with cream, either whipped or plain.

Chocolate Blancmange—IX

  • 1-pint milk
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1/4 cup health cocoa
  • 1 teaspoon caramel
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • A few grains salt

Heat the milk in a double boiler. Mix the sugar, cocoa, cornstarch, and salt. Pour the hot milk over this mixture and mix thoroughly. Then return to the double boiler, add the caramel, and cook fifteen minutes, or till thickened. Add the vanilla and pour into cups wet with cold water. When cold, unmold and serve with cream.

Chocolate Blancmange-X

Soak one ounce of gelatin for fifteen minutes in one cup of cold milk, then add two cups and a half of boiling milk. Mix a quarter of a pound of grated chocolate with half a cup of cold milk and add it to the gelatin with six tablespoons of granulated sugar.

Place this in a saucepan over the fire and stir constantly until it boils. Remove from the fire, stir in one tablespoon of vanilla extract, and when cooled pour into the molds, which have previously been rinsed with cold water and sprinkled with granulated sugar. Set in cold place until firm. Serve with liquid cream sauce.

Chocolate Blanemange à l’Européenne
Blanemanger au Chooolat, à l’Européenne

One cup water, two tablespoons cornstarch, four ounces chocolate, five tablespoons sugar, one-pound English walnuts, whites of four eggs. Put water on stove, thicken with the dissolved corn starch, add three tablespoons sugar, chocolate, chopped nuts, six spoons gelatin.

Stir on ice till cold. Beat the whites stiff with two tablespoons sugar and add. Glaze a mold with lemon aspic and decorate with English walnuts-—about half inch apart; fill each space between the nuts with whipped cream that contains some gelatin.

Then fill with the mixture; leave on ice until ready to serve. Dip in warm water, turn out on a paper doily. Serve with whipped cream in the center of the ring.

Chocolate Blancmange à la Pompadour
Blanemanger au Chooolat, à la Pompadour

Glaze a ring mold with lemon aspic flavored with brandy; decorate in pompadour style with chocolate layer cake cut in strips.

FILLING. One cup water, six tablespoons dissolved Cox's gelatin, one tablespoon cornstarch, four ounces chocolate, four tablespoons sugar, one tablespoon brandy, one cup whipped cream.

Put half cup water on stove, add the sugar, thicken with the cornstarch dissolved in the half cup water, add the cut-up chocolate, stir on ice, add the gelatin and brandy; when thick, add the whipped cream. Fill; leave on ice until ready to serve.

Chocolate Blanemange à la Walde
Blancmanger au Chocolat, à la Waldo

Put half cup water on stove, add three tablespoons sugar and one tablespoon brandy, thicken with one tablespoon cornstarch that has been dissolved in half cup water, add two ounces chocolate; when all is well mixed, put on ice, add three tablespoons dissolved Cox’s gelatin and three tablespoons whipped cream.

This is the decoration for the mold. First put a dot of chocolate (as big as a small chestnut), then one of whipped cream (containing some gelatin), then of chocolate, then of cream, etc., around the bottom of the mold; drip aspic on the top. Fill with the chocolate blancmange.

FILLING. One cup water, one tablespoon cornstarch, four ounces chocolate, seven tablespoons dissolve Cox’s gelatin, five tablespoons sugar, one and a half cups whipped cream. Put water on stove, add the dissolved cornstarch, sugar, and chocolate; stir on ice until cold; last add the whipped cream. Fill, leave on ice until ready to serve.

Dip in warm water, turn out on a paper doily. Serve with whipped cream in the center.

Chocolate Blancmange with Cocoanut, à la Emma Charlotte
Blancmanger au Coco, à la Emma Charlotte

One cup water, six tablespoons dissolved Cox's gelatin, tablespoon cornstarch, four ounces chocolate, four tablespoons sugar, tablespoon brandy, cup whipped cream, cup cocoanut.

How to Make It. Put half cup water on stove, add the sugar, thicken with the cornstarch dissolved in the half cup water, add the cut-up chocolate and cocoanut, stir on ice, add gelatin and brandy; when thick, add the whipped cream. Fill a ring mold (that has been glazed with lemon aspic), leave on ice until ready to serve.

Dip in warm water, turn out on a paper doily, sprinkle with cocoanut. Serve with whipped cream in the center.

Cocoa Blancmange

  • Mix one heaping tablespoonful of cocoa with two tablespoons of water and half a cup of sugar
  • Stir into one and one-half cups of boiling milk
  • Thicken with two heaping tablespoons of corn starch rubbed smooth with half a cup of cold milk.
  • Cook for five or ten minutes, stirring constantly, add a teaspoonful of vanilla
  • Mold, chill, and serve with cream.

Coffee Blancmange in Aspic, à la Teckla
Blancmanger au Café en Aspic, à la Teckla

One cup strong coffee, one tablespoon brandy, one tablespoon cornstarch, five tablespoons sugar, one and a half cups whipped cream, six tablespoons dissolved Cox’s gelatin.

Put coffee on the stove, thicken with one tablespoon cornstarch, adding sugar, brandy, and the pinch salt. When thickened, stir in a saucepan on ice, adding gelatin; stir until cold. When beginning to thicken, add the whipped cream.

In the meantime, glaze a fancy ring mold with lemon aspic, decorate with different colored creams containing some gelatin, glaze with lemon aspic, drip about half inch coffee aspic on top, fill carefully, and then fill with coffee aspic around and on the top. Leave on the ice until ready to serve. Dip in warm water, turn out on a paper doily, garnish with balls of spun sugar around.

Cream Blancmange—I

  • Heat a pint of milk with a pinch of salt and half a cup of sugar.
  • Thicken with three tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth in a little cold milk.
  • Flavor to taste, take from the fire, and fold in the stiffly beaten whites of two eggs.
  • Mold, chill, and serve with boiled custard.

Cream Blancmange—II

  • Heat a quart of milk in a double boiler and thicken with three heaping tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little cold milk.
  • Cook for fifteen minutes, adding a pinch of salt and flavoring to taste.
  • Turn into a serving-dish and cool.
  • Serve with a sauce made of jelly or jam mixed with the stiffly beaten whites of two eggs.

Cream Blancmange—III

  • Heat a quart of milk in a double boiler and thicken with four heaping tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little cold milk.
  • Cook until smooth and thick, stirring constantly, sweeten and flavor to taste
  • Take from the fire, fold in the stiffly beaten whites of three eggs
  • Mold, and chill. Serve with boiled custard.

Cream Blancmange—IV

  • Heat a quart of milk in a double boiler and thicken with three heaping teaspoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little cold milk.
  • Cook for fifteen minutes
  • Take from the fire, add the yolks of three eggs beaten with three-fourths cup of sugar, and flavoring to taste.
  • Turn into a buttered baking-dish
  • Bake for fifteen minutes
  • Spread with the beaten whites of the eggs and return to the oven until puffed and brown.
  • Serve cold. Or, add half a cup of jelly to the meringue just before serving, and do not bake.

Coffee Blancmange

  • Bring to the boil one cupful each of milk and coffee with two tablespoons of sugar.
  • Thicken with two level tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth in a little cold milk.
  • Mold, chill, and serve with cream.

Farina Blancmange-I

  • Heat a quart of milk in a double boiler, and sprinkle in half a cupful of farina, a pinch of salt, and two tablespoons or more of sugar.
  • Cook for fifteen minutes, stirring constantly, flavor to taste
  • Mold, chill, and serve with chocolate sauce or whipped cream.

Farina Blancmange-II

  • 1-pint milk
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup farina
  • A few grains salt

Heat the milk with the sugar in a double boiler. Stir in the farina and salt and continue to stir till the milk is thickened and the farina does not settle. Cook it in a double boiler one hour, then pour it into cups that have been wet with cold water. When cold, unmold and serve with cocoanut sauce.

Cornstarch blancmange is made by substituting cornstarch for the farina and stirring it smooth with a little of the milk saved out for that purpose before stirring it into the hot milk.

Fruit Blancmange—I

  • Drain the juice from a can of fruit and add enough cold water to make a pint.
  • Heat in a double boiler and thicken with two tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little of it.
  • Add more sugar if required, then the fruit
  • Mold, chill, and serve with cream and sugar.

Fruit Blancmange—II

  • Bring to the boil two cups of strawberry juice and one cupful of water, sweetening to taste
  • Thicken with three heaping tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little cold water
  • Mold, chill, sprinkle with chopped nuts, and serve with whipped cream. Other fruit juices may be used in the same way. Farina may be used instead of cornstarch, allowing four tablespoons of dry farina to each quart of juice.

Fruit Blancmange—III

  • Mix the juice of a lemon with a cupful each of sugar and wine.
  • Add half a package of gelatin  which has been soaked and dissolved and mix thoroughly with a quart of cream
  • Stir occasionally until it begins to set.
  • Mold, chill, and serve with boiled custard or with whipped or plain cream sweetened and flavored to taste.

Fruits in Blancmange Border
Put two ounces of gelatin into three pints of water, and let it boil for half an hour: then strain it into one and a half pints of cream and sweeten it. Flavor in accordance with the fruit to be used, boil up once, let it settle, and turn it into a border mold wet with cold water. When firm, turn the blancmange out on a flat dish and heap preserved fruit in the space in the center. Almost any preserved fruit can be used in this way.

Irish Moss Blancmange-I

1/3 cup Irish moss 
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 cups milk
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla

Soak moss fifteen minutes in cold water to cover, drain, pick over, and add to milk; cook in double boiler thirty minutes; the milk will seem but little thicker than when put on to cook, but if cooked longer blanc-mange will be too stiff. Add salt, strain, flavor, re-strain, and fill individual moulds previously dipped in cold water; chill, turn on glass dish, surround with thin slices of banana, and place a slice on each mould. Serve with sugar and cream.

Irish Moss Blancmange-II

  • 1-quart milk
  • 1/6 ounce (a small handful) Irish moss
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Prepare the moss by soaking and washing it in four changes of cold water, allowing it to soak about fifteen minutes the first time and five or ten minutes the succeeding times, picking it out of each water into the other with the fingers, carefully looking it over, and removing any sand or dark spots.

Put the milk into a double boiler to heat. When boiling hot, put the washed moss into the hot milk and cook thirty minutes. The milk will not seem much thickened, but it will be solid when cold.

Strain through a fine sieve, stirring the moss to allow all the milk to drain out. Add the remaining ingredients to the milk. Stir well to dissolve the sugar.

Pour into a mold wet with cold water or pour into individual molds. When cold, turn out of the molds, and serve with cream or with sliced bananas and cream.

Caramel blancmange may be made by adding to the mixture just before pouring it into the molds, sufficient caramel to give it a delicate brown color and a slightly caramel flavor.

Irish Moss Blancmange-III

  • 1-3 cup Irish moss
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cups milk
  • 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla.

Soak moss fifteen minutes in cold water to cover, drain, pick over, and add to milk; cook in double boiler thirty minutes; the milk will seem but little thicker than when put on to cook, but if cooked longer blancmange will be too stiff.

Add salt, strain, flavor, re-strain, and fill individual molds previously dipped in cold water; chill, turn on glass dish, surround with thin slices of banana, and place a slice on each mold. Serve with sugar and cream.

Irish Moss Chocolate Blancmange-I

Irish Moss Blancmange flavored with chocolate. Melt one and one-half squares Baker’s chocolate, add one-fourth cup sugar and one-third cup boiling water, stir until perfectly smooth, adding to milk just before taking from fire. Serve with sugar and cream.

Irish Moss Chocolate Blancmange

Irish Moss Blancmange flavored with chocolate. Melt one and one-half squares Baker's chocolate, add one-fourth cup sugar and one-third cup boiling water, stir until perfectly smooth, adding to milk just before taking from fire. Serve with sugar and cream.

Orange Flower Blancmange

  • Chop fine a pound of blanched almonds, rub to a paste
  • Add a quart of boiling milk and a cup and a half of sugar. When the sugar is dissolved
  • Add a tablespoon of orange-flower water and half a teaspoonful of almond extract.
  • Add a package of gelatin which has been soaked and dissolved
  • Mold, chill, and serve with whipped cream.

Peach Blancmange Pudding

Make a plain blancmange, using one quart of milk. Make, also, a peach jelly flavored with fruit syrup and colored pink with a few drops of cochineal or color paste.

Wet a plain mold and pour in the blanc-mange and gelatin in alternate layers, allowing each to harden before the next is added. Just before serving-time unmold and garnish with slices of fresh or preserved peaches and maraschino cherries. Serve with plain cream and sugar.

Prune Blancmange in Aspic, à la Maria Mathilda
Blancmanger aux Pruneaux en Aspic, a la Maria Mathilda

Glaze a ring mold with lemon aspic, decorate with a white and pink daisy from whipped cream that contains some gelatin; glaze again. Cut in small pieces some prunes that have been cooked in sugar, water, lemon, and brandy; put a laver of prunes then a laver of aspic—carefully, so as not to touch the edge, then another layer until it reaches the ring line of the mold. Fill with the second filling.

Second Filling. Half cup prune juice, six tablespoons dissolved Cox’s gelatin, juice of a half lemon, two tablespoons brandy, three tablespoons sugar. Stir prune juice and gelatin on ice until thickened, add one cup of cut-up prunes and last one cup whipped cream. Fill the mold and leave on ice until ready to serve.

Dip in warm water and turn out on a nice paper doily. Serve with whipped cream.

Quince Blancmange
(Delicious.)

This, if carefully made, and with ripe quinces, is one of the most richly-flavored preparations of fruit that we have ever tasted; and the receipe, we may venture to say, will be altogether new to the reader.

Dissolve in a pint of prepared juice of quinces, an ounce of the best isinglass; next, add ten ounces of sugar, roughly pounded, and stir these together gently over a clear fire, from twenty to thirty minutes, or until the juice jellies in falling from the spoon.

Remove the scum carefully, and pour the boiling jelly gradually to half a pint of thick cream, stirring them briskly together as they are mixed: they must be stirred until very nearly cold, and then poured into a mold which has been rubbed in every part with the smallest possible quantity of very pure salad oil, or if more convenient, into one that has been dipped into cold water.

Observations. — This blancmange which we had made originally on the thought of the moment for a friend, proved so very rich in flavor, that we inserted the exact recipe for it, as we had had it made on our first trial; but it might be simplified by merely boiling the juice, sugar, and isinglass, together for a few minutes, and then mixing them with the cream.

An ounce and a half of isinglass and three-quarters of a pint of cream might then be used for it. The juice of other fruit may be substituted for that of the quinces, Juice of quinces, 1 pint; isinglass, 1 oz.: 5 to 10 minutes. Sugar,10 oz.: 20 to 30 minutes. Cream, 1/2 pint.

Raspberry Blancmange

  • Thicken two cups of milk with two level tablespoons of cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little of it
  • Add a pinch of salt, and two eggs beaten with three tablespoons of sugar.
  • Cook until smooth and thick, stirring constantly
  • Pour over crushed and sweetened raspberries
  • Chill and serve with cream.

Sago Blancmange

  • Soak three-fourths cupful of sago for two hours in three cups of cold water.
  • Heat three cups of milk in a double boiler
  • Add the sago and half a cup of sugar
  • Cook for fifteen minutes, stirring constantly.
  • Flavor to taste
  • Mold, and chill. (Tapioca may be used instead of sago if it is soaked overnight.)

Sea-Moss Blancmange

  • The genuine sea-moss must be bought at the druggist's.
  • Wash a handful of it in several waters and put into a quart of boiling milk.
  • Cook in a double boiler until thick, adding a pinch of salt
  • Add sugar to taste, and any preferred flavoring.
  • Strain into molds and serve very cold with cream.

Blancmanger à la Smolenska
Soften one ounce of gelatin in cold water and dissolve it in a gill of orange syrup; add to it a pint of filbert milk, made like almond milk (No. 4), substituting filberts for almonds, and strain into a tin basin. Let this preparation become cold on ice, and just as it begins to thicken incorporate about three pints of well-whipped cream. Pour this into a dome-shaped mold, cover with a sheet of paper, close hermetically with a lid, and chill in lightly salted ice. One hour will suffice for this operation. Unmold on a cold dish and serve.

Strawberry Blancmange (Blanc-Manger aux Fraises).
Pound half a pound of freshly peeled almonds, a few at a time; dilute with a quart of cold milk and press the whole slowly through a napkin held by two persons, to extract all the liquid thoroughly.

Mix into this, almond milk, three-quarters of a pound of powdered sugar, some lemon peel or half a split vanilla bean, and a quarter of an hour later put into the liquid fifteen clarified gelatin leaves. Strain and try a little on ice to judge of its strength.

Incrust a plain cylindrical mold on ice, coat it with clear jelly mixed with strawberry or orange juice and filtered through blotting paper. Stir on ice two-thirds of the blanc-mange to thicken it slightly, using a spoon, and as soon as perfect, mix in a fine salpicon of candied pineapple; pour this into the coated mold and leave it to stand for one hour.

Thicken the remainder of the preparation on ice, and with it fill five small timbale molds, also incrusted on a thick bed of ice spread over the bottom of a deep sautoir.

Three-quarters of an hour later empty out the centers of the small molds with a tin tube dipped in hot water; to remove these pieces it is only necessary to heat the bottom of the molds slightly; replace them on ice and fill the center with some of the same preparation mingled with strawberry juice; let this get hard.

Unmold the small timbales and cut each one across in three parts. Dip the large mold quickly into hot water; invert on a cold dish and surround the base with the rings, then fill up the hollow with Chantilly cream, flavored with almonds, having it dome-shaped.

Surround this dome with a few large strawberries, each one cut in two and dressed flat to resemble a rosette. Serve at the same time a bowlful of strawberry purée sweetened with syrup, having it very cold.

Extremely Good Strawberry Blancmange

Crush slightly with a silver or wooden spoon, a quart, measured without their stalks, of fresh and richly-flavored strawberries; strew over them eight ounces of pounded sugar, and let them stand for three or four hours; then turn them on to a fine hair-sieve reversed, and rub them through it.

Melt over a gentle fire two ounces of the best isinglass in a pint of new milk, and sweeten it with four ounces of sugar; strain it through a muslin, and mix it with a pint and a quarter of sweet thick cream; keep these stirred until they are nearly or quite cold, then pour them gradually to the strawberries, whisking them briskly together; and last of all thrown, by small portions, the strained juice of a fine sound lemon Mold the blancmange, and set it in a very cool place for twelve hours or more before it is served.

Strawberries stalked, 1 quart; sugar, 8 oz; isinglass 2 oz.; new milk, 1 pint; sugar, 4 oz.; cream, 1 1/4 pint; juice, 1 lemon.

Observation. —We have retained here the old-fashioned name of blancmange because it is more familiar to many English readers than any of recent introduction; but molded strawberry-cream would be more appropriate; as nothing can properly be called blancmange which is not white. By mingling the cream, after it has been whisked, or whipped, to the other ingredients, the preparation becomes what is called an Fromuge Bavarois, or Bavarian cream, sometimes simply, une Bavarois.

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Epicurean Cooking Terms

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