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Handbook for Travellers from Overseas - 1913


GREAT WESTERN
RAILWAY , England.

Handbook for Travellers from Overseas.
G.W.R.
T. KATELEY, General Agent for U.S.A.,
501, Fifth Avenue, New York.
R. H. LEA, General Agent for Canada,
35, Adelaide Street East, Toronto.
L. W. MEADOWS, G.W.R. General Agent,
1, bis Rue Scribe, Paris.
Tor farther list of Agencies see page 54.
Headquarters & General OFFICES :
PADDINGTON STATION, LONDON.
CONTENTS. PAGE
Preface.. .. .. .. .. 23
The Thames Valley and Historic Oxford .. 28
Some Notable Inland Health and Pleasure Resorts 34
Paddington Station .. .. .. .. 25
Royal Windsor and " Beechy " Bucks 26
In Shakespeare s Country .. .. .. 31
Famous English Cathedrals. .. .. 37
Wales. Its Associations and. Attractions .. 40
The Wye Valley .. .. .. .. 44
On the Shores of Severn Sea .. .. 46
The Mendips, the Quantocks and Exmoor .. 47
" Wessex," and the Channel Islands .. .. 43 In Country of the Pilgrim Fathers, and of Drake,
Raleigh, Coleridge and Kingsley .. 50
The Cornish Riviera and the Scilly Islands .. 52
54 Ticket Agencies
55 General Information
... Arrangements at ...
PLYMOUTH, BRISTOL, LIVERPOOL, FISHGUARD, and QUEENSTOWN.
Sketch Map of G.W.R.
The Great Western Railway. Arrangements at Plymouth Arrangements at Bristol ... Arrangements at Liverpool Arrangements at Fishguard Arrangements at Queenstown G.W.R. Travel Books ...
The Traveller in England. Where to go. What
to see
• • •
2
A short description 3
5
9
13
16
19
• • •
• • •
• • •
• • •
20
21
Paddington Station,
London, W.
April, 1913.
FRANK POTTER, General Manager.
(Subject to alteration.)


GREAT WESTERN
RAILWAY , England.

Handbook for Travellers
from Overseas.
G.W.R.
T. KATELEY, General Agent for U.S.A.,
501, Fifth Avenue, New York.
R. H. LEA, General Agent for Canada,
35, Adelaide Street East, Toronto.
L. W. MEADOWS, G.W.R. General Agent,
1, bis Rue Scribe, Paris.
Tor farther list of Agencies see page 54.
Headquarters & General OFFICES :
PADDINGTON STATION, LONDON.
CONTENTS. PAGE
Preface.. .. .. .. .. 23
The Thames Valley and Historic Oxford .. 28
Some Notable Inland Health and Pleasure Resorts 34
Paddington Station .. .. .. .. 25
Royal Windsor and " Beechy " Bucks 26
In Shakespeare s Country .. .. .. 31
Famous English Cathedrals. .. .. 37
Wales. Its Associations and. Attractions .. 40
The Wye Valley .. .. .. .. 44
On the Shores of Severn Sea .. .. 46
The Mendips, the Quantocks and Exmoor .. 47
" Wessex," and the Channel Islands .. .. 43 In Country of the Pilgrim Fathers, and of Drake,
Raleigh, Coleridge and Kingsley .. 50
The Cornish Riviera and the Scilly Islands .. 52
54 Ticket Agencies
55 General Information
... Arrangements at ...
PLYMOUTH, BRISTOL, LIVERPOOL, FISHGUARD, and QUEENSTOWN.
Sketch Map of G.W.R.
The Great Western Railway. Arrangements at Plymouth Arrangements at Bristol ... Arrangements at Liverpool Arrangements at Fishguard Arrangements at Queenstown G.W.R. Travel Books ...
The Traveller in England. Where to go. What
to see
• • •
2
A short description 3
5
9
13
16
19
• • •
• • •
• • •
• • •
20
21
Paddington Station,
London, W.
April, 1913.
FRANK POTTER, General Manager.
(Subject to alteration.)

THE GREAT WESTERN . RAILWAY. .
The Great Western Railway was originally incorporated in 1835 for railway 118 miles long from London to Bristol, but has grown by various amalgamations to 3,159 miles, and is the longest and most up-to-date railway in the British Isles. The number of Americans and Colonials who visit England every year with the object of exploring, with feelings of deep interest and veneration, the historic sites of the eventfu1 past, is steadily increasing. The facilities for travel are also increasing, and the Great Western Railway and its connections now serve practically all the places of antiquarian, historical, scenic and commercia1 interest in the country. -
2

THE principal of Britain's Trunk Lines, and the longest railway in the United Kingdom, the Great Western is essentially the railway for comfortable, expeditious, and convenient travel in the "Old Country."
Direct express services are given by the Great Western with the four great Ports used by transatlantic vessels, LIVERPOOL, FISHGUARD, PLYMOUTH and BRISTOL, and special trains are run from these Ports in connection with the arrival of the principal boats.
The requirements of Americans and visitors from Over-seas are made the subject of special study in all Great Western services, and whilst London will probably be the first objective of a vast number of visitors, for the convenience of those who desire to start their round of sightseeing from their port of debarkation, a number of special comprehensive itineraries have been arranged which enable this to be done en route to the Metropolis. Taking LIVERPOOL as an example, it is possible to comprise within the journey to London, such places of historic importance and associations as Chester, Stratford-on-Avon, Warwick, Oxford and Windsor, with express services from point to point, and all without payment beyond the usual fare at which passengers are conveyed the direct journey from Liverpool to London. Full reference will be made later to these and other special facilities and arrangements at each port; it will be sufficient if it be mentioned here that the ramifications of the Great Western system extend from the great ports on the western sea-board already alluded to, converging on London by four main line routes.

When it is mentioned that in addition to those places referred to on the Liverpool-London route, Bath, Exeter, Salisbury, Wells. Glastonbury, Kenilworth, Evesham, Henley-on-Thames, the "Penn " Country, and numerous districts essential for inclusion in a round of sight-seeing, can all be reached with the greatest of ease by the Great Western Railway, the importance of the line will be readily appreciated.
1 tour in Ireland, of at least a few days' duration, forms part of the itinerary of every American and visitor from Over-seas, and whether the traveller lands at Queenstown (Ireland) and sees the Lakes of Killarney first, or makes a pilgrimage there after visiting England, it should be remembered that the route par excellence between the Isles of the Rose and Shamrock is the short-sea route via Fishguard.
In the matter of rolling stock, road-bed and locomotives, those of the G.W.R. rank amongst the finest in the world. Famous in the days of Thackeray for smoothness of travel, the Great Western has maintained its traditions to the utmost, whilst the splendid restaurant service and comfortable roomy carriages of today would doubtless bring still greater joy to the heart of the great writer of the early Victorian age, could he but compare them with his experiences recorded in his writings.*
Great Western Railway Time Tables are available on ail Ocean Liners, and are sent post free to all parts of the world on application to the Great Western Railway General gents in New York or Toronto, or to the Superintendent of the line, Great Western Railway, Paddington Terminus, London, W.
Thackeray's Cockney Travels."—Harper's Magazine, June, 1911.
" It is certain that in the midst of all the speculation, delightful as it is, ten minutes' pause at Swindon, where there are twelve young women behind the counter covered with all sorts of good things which money can buy—ten minutes' stop at Swindon is by no means a disagreeable interruption to those who have either eaten no dinner or have had the good fortune to gain an appetite since that meal. The little Quakers come back munching their biscuits, the red-whiskered hero wipes from his lips the froth of a pint of Dublin stout. A slight attempt at general conversation takes place, which is carried on for a while pretty briskly and audibly, because the Great Western seems to have over other lines of road this advantage, that one can speak without shouting and be heard, too so excellently smooth and comfortable are the carriages and the path over which they travel."

Arrangements at BRISTOL.
The Great Western Railway forms the direct route from Bristol to London. which is approximately 120 miles distant, and some of the Express Trains perform the journey in two hours.
The Great Western Railway Company run fast Express Trains from Bristol (Temple Meads and Stapleton Road Stations) :
To Manchester, Leeds, Bradford, Liverpool, Newcastle, Glasgow, Edinburgh, and other important towns in the North of England and Scotland.
To Cheltenham, Stratford-on-Avon, Birmingham and South Staffordshire.
To Leicester, Nottingham, Sheffield and York.
If it be desired to reach the Continent direct without making any stay in England, a through route to the Continent is available via Reading and Folkestone or Dover.
DOCK ACCOMMODATION.
Ocean Passengers via Bristol generally land at the Avonmouth (Royal Edward) Dock in that city, and Boat Specials run from and to the Royal Edward Dock Station alongside the steamers.
Waiting and Retiring Rooms, and a Refreshment Buffet are provided adjoining the Customs Examination Room, and also an Inland Telegraph, Cable, " Wireless " and Telephone Office.
ENQUIRIES.
Great Western Railway representatives meet steamers on arrival, and will render every assistance to Passengers intending to proceed by Great Western Railway. They are prepared to supply Passengers with information as to Train services, reservation of compartments, etc.
BAGGAGE.
Passengers are relieved of all trouble in connection with their baggage. Dock porters land it, unpack it for Customs examination and afterwards repack it, and Railway porters label it to destination and place it in the Train. The Passenger must produce his ticket to the baggage checker before his baggage is labelled.
Baggage in the following quantities may be taken by every Ocean Passenger without extra charge :
1st Class Passenger .. 24o lbs.
3rd Class Passenger .. .. 120 lbs.
any excess being charged at the ordinary Excess Luggage rate; it can be warehoused at Bristol at a small charge, or sent to destination station free (if within the weight allowed) and warehoused there. The Railway Company will also, if required, arrange delivery at a moderate charge,
Heavy luggage can be left in charge of the Dock officials to be forwarded by Freight Train at the cheaper rates applying to this service.

BRISTOL—continued.
TRAINS to LONDON and all parts.
Ordinary or Special Trains can be taken for London and elsewhere without delay.
In the event of a steamer arriving when an Ordinary Express Train is not available, a Special Train will be run from the Docks to London (Paddington Station), if the circumstances and number of passengers render it necessary, immediately the Passengers are landed and luggage cleared. The Special Trains to Paddington perform the journey in about two hours.
When an Ordinary Train is used, railway carriages are provided at the Royal Edward Dock Station, and run to Bristol Station, where they are attached to the Ordinary Express Train.
BRISTOL—continued.
ACCOMMODATION IN LONDON.
If accommodation be required in London at the Royal Hotel, Paddington Station, the Great 'Western representative, upon being notified, will telegraph free of charge for same to be reserved. Private Omnibuses can be ordered in the same way. (See page 55.)
REDUCED FARES FOR OCEAN PASSENGERS AND THEIR FRIENDS.
Special Reduced Fares are in operation for Ocean Passengers embarking or landing at Avonmouth, Bristol, and for their Friends travelling to meet them or see them off, as under :—
English Currency.
OCEAN PASSENGERS.•
Single Journey.
FRIENDS OP
OCEAN
PASSENGERS
American Return
Currency. Journey.
ROYAL EDWARD
Dock
AVONMOUTH,
AND
1st 3rd. 1st 3rd 1st I 3rd
Class. Class. Class. Class. Class. Class.
Birmingham Bordesley
Didcot
Droit wich Handsworth Kidderminster .. London (Padding-
ton) .. 17 6 Malvern, Great .. 8 4
Reading .. .. 12 6
Smal1 Heath .. 11 3
Stratford-on-Avon 9 9
Worcester .. 8 4
s. d. $ c. $ c. s. d. s. d.
7 5 2 77 .1 81 16 10 9 8
7 5 2 75 1 81 16 10 9 8
5 9 2 57 1 41 14 2 7 3
6 1 2 16 1 49 12 5 7 7
7 5 2 75 1 81 16 10 9 8
6 7 2 51 1 61 14 5 8 6
9 8 4 27 2 36 22 2 11 2
5 4 2 04 1 31 11 9 6 11
6 11 3 05 1 69 17 7 8 10
7 5 2 75 1 1 81 16 10 9 8
6 4 2 38 1 55 13 8 711
5 6 2 04 1 35 11 9 7 1
s. d. 11 4 11 3
10 6
8 10
11 3 10 3
REFRESHMENT SERVICE.
Restaurant Cars are usually run on the Special Trains; passengers travelling by Ordinary Trains can obtain Luncheon or Tea Baskets at stations en route. These can be ordered by telegraph, without extra charge, on application to the Great Western representative at the Docks.

SKETCH MAP SHEWING G.W.R. AND CONNECTING ROUTES FROM BRISTOL,
10
•Tickets available for seven days from date of issue. tTickets available for four days from date of issue.
In order to obtain tickets at the reduced fares, Friends of Ocean Passengers must, when booking, surrender a special voucher, issued on application by the Shipping Agents.
RAIL TICKETS ISSUED ON BOARD LINERS.
On the steamers of the Royal Line (Canada-Bristol) Great Western Railway tickets can be obtained from the purser during the voyage. In other cases orders are given to be exchanged at the Booking Office at the Royal Edward Dock Station for a Railway Ticket.
Passengers should ask for Tickets by
" GREAT WESTERN " Route.
In all cases of over-sea Passengers using the Port of Bristol, a voucher can be obtained from the Shipping Co. entitling the Passenger to a special reduced fare ticket from Bristol (Avonmouth Dock) to London and certain other of the principal stations on the Great Western Railway. Information can be obtained from the Great Western Company's representative, who will meet the steamers.
Great Western Railway Time Tables, Pamphlets, etc., are on board the Liners for reference.
II

BRISTOL—continued.
TRAVELLERS RETURNING FROM ENGLAND Via BRISTOL.
The Superintendent of the Line, Paddington Station, London, will, on application, furnish all particulars to Passengers travelling to Bristol to join outgoing steamers, and will, on receipt of notification, and the purchase of tickets covering the journey, arrange for the collection of Passengers' luggage, within a certain radius in London and the principal towns served, and see that it is placed on the outgoing steamer, at a charge of ls. (25 cents) per package up to the weight allowed according to the class of ticket taken.
Luggage brought to any Great Western Station by Passengers will be conveyed and placed on outgoing steamer at a charge of 6d. (13 cents) per package up to the weight allowed according to the class of ticket held, which must be produced at the time.

General Information.
BAGGAGE OR CLOAK ROOMS.
There are Baggage or Cloak Rooms at the principal Stations, and a charge of Twopence (5 Cents) is made for each package of Passenger's Baggage warehoused, for any period not exceeding two days, and after two days One Penny (2 Cents) additional is charged for each package per day or part of a day. In each case the day of deposit and withdrawal is counted as one day.
CHILDREN
under 12 years of age (and over 3) travel at half fare; Children under three ears free when accompanied by parents or guardians.
DAY TICKETS.
Special Cheap Day tickets are issued in London for Windsor, Maiden-bead, Taplow, Marlow, Henley, Pangbourne, Wallingford, and other Thames Valley resorts during the summer months. Combined " Rail and Steamer " Tickets are also issued during the summer months. Combined " Rail and Automobile " Tickets are issued to Penn's Country and Milton's Cottage, via Stoke Poges, Burnham and Beeches, Beaconsfield and Chalfont St. Giles; also to Shakespeare's Country via Leamington, Warwick, Charlcote Park and Shottery. For particulars of these tours and others specially arranged for American and visitors from overseas, see special programme, free on application.
ENGAGED COMPARTMENTS.
Compartments will be reserved on notice being given and a specified number of seats being occupied or paid for. During Bank Holiday seasons and on other special occasions, First and Third-class Compartments can only be reserved on condition that the whole of the seats in the compartment are occupied.
FOLDING TABLES.
For the convenience of first-class passengers, small folding tables, for luncheon, settling, or other purposes, are available at those stations at which there are Refreshment Rooms. The charge for hire is 61 (53 Cents).
LADIES' COMPARTMENTS.
Ladies' Compartments are reserved on long-distance trains, and the Company are always prepared to make arrangements for reservation of compartments exclusively for ladies under any reasonable circumstances.
LUNCHEON AND Tea BASKETS.
Luncheon and Tea Baskets, charge as. 6d. (61 Cents) and 1s. (25 Cents), respectively may be obtained at Stations where there are Refreshment Rooms. Tea Baskets, for two persons, Is. 6d. (37 Cents). Notice should be given to the guard at a previous stopping station.
PARCELS TO ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD.
Parcels can be handed in at the various stations and offices of the Company. for dispatch direct to any part of the world, thus avoiding all trcuble to these not acquainted with the routine of forwarding parcels abroad.
The value of the content> of parcels for abroad will, if desired, be collected from consignees on delivery, and the amount so collected paid to the sender, as soon as it is notified mat such amount has been received, a nominal charge being made for this service. .
PRIVATE OMNIBUSES
capable ci conveying Six Persons Inside and Two Outside, with the usual quantity of Luggage, can be obtained at Paddington Station at the following charges :—For distances not exceeding six miles from Paddington Station, One Shilling (25 Cents) per Mile including the Driver and a reasonable quantity of luggage, with a minimum charge of Four Shillings (98 Cents). For distances beyond six miles, One Shilling and Sixpence (37 Cents) per Mile. When the distance or the quantity of Luggage is too great for one horse and two horses become necessary, the charge for any distance wil1 be Two Shillings (49 Cents) per Mile, with a minimum charge of Six Shillings ($r.47). Twenty-four Hours' Notice should be given to the Station Master at Paddington, when a Private Omnibus is required.
55

GENERAL INFORMATION—continued. PRIVATE BROUGHAMS
attend the arrival of all Trains at Paddington throughout the day, and may be hired at the following charges, including the Driver's fees : For the first hour, 3s. (74 Cents); after the first hour, 2s. 6d. (6e Cents) per hour; or, if according to distance, at as. 6d. (37 Cents) per mile. The minimum charge is Six Shillings and Sixpence ($1.59).
RESTAURANT CARS.
Breakfast, Luncheon, Tea and Dining Cars are run on the principal express trains. The tariff is moderate and the spacious and comfortable cars 1end enjoyment to the excellent meals provided. The G.W.R. Restaurant Car service affords carefully prepared menus, courteous attendants, the best catering the market supplies, moderate prices.
RUGS AND PILLOWS.
Obtainable for use on night trains at charge of 6d. (r3 Cents) per article.
SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC.
The following are extracts from the Rules and Regulations of the Great Western Railway Company affecting its servants : " 5. All servants must be prompt, civil and obliging. They must afford every proper facility for the business to be performed, and, when asked, give their names and numbers without hesitation." " 6. The safety of the public must, under all circumstances be the chief care of the servants of the Company." It is the Company's desire that the service rendered to passengers shall be above criticism. Any complaints will receive careful and courteous attention, and should be addressed to the Superintendent of the Line, Paddington Station.
THROUGH BOOKINGS OF PASSENGERS TO CANADA, THE UNITED STATES, AND AUSTRALIA.
Passengers can be booked through to any part of Canada, the United States or Australia, from any station on the Great Western Railway, and information as to sailings, etc., will be supplied on application.
TIME BOOKS.
Time Books, Maps, etc., are supplied to the Liners calling at the Ports of Plymouth, Bristol, Southampton, Liverpool, Fishguard and Queenstown, the offices of the Great Western General Agents for the United States and Canada, in New York and Toronto,also to the New York Offices of the International Sleeping Car Company, of Mr. Frank C. Clark, and of Messrs. Thomas Cook & Son. The books, etc., will be forwarded, free of charge to any part of the world, on application to the Superintendent of the Line, Paddington Station, London, of whom particulars of Trains, Fares, and other arrangements may be obtained.
TOURIST TICKETS.
Amongst the many tourist arrangements, it may be mentioned that the Company issue tickets affording travellers in the British Isles opportunities of undertaking popular tours with the privilege of breaking the journey at specified stations, for visiting places celebrated for their historical and antiquarian interest.
A copy of the complete Tourist Programme can be obtained free of charge on application to the Superintendent of the Line, Paddington Station, London, W.
WEEK-END TICKETS.
On Fridays and Saturdays, Cheap Tickets, available for the return journey on the following Sunday (where Train Services allow), Monday or Tuesday, are issued to many places of interest.
These tickets are very advantageous to persons desirous of spending Saturday and Sunday in the country.
N.B.—When at any of the numerous Cities or Towns served by the Great Western Railway, visitors are recommended to inquire at the Great Western Station for particulars of the facilities afforded for cheap travel, as the arrangements of the Company in this respect are varied and comprehensive, and full particulars cannot be embodied in a pamphlet of this description.
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