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Hairdressing to Landing Arrangements - What to Know About Ocean Travel - 1924

Topics on this page include: Hairdressing, Halifas, Hamburg, Havana, Haverford, Homeric, Hotels in Europe, Household Goods, Income Tax Clearance, Information, Inquiry Office on Steamers, Interpreters, Keys, Kroonland, Landing Arrangements.

HAIRDRESSING

(See "Barbers").

HALIFAX

Port of call for the White Star-Dominion Line and Red Star Line during the winter, and a westbound call for the New York-Hamburg service. Convenient rail connections to interior points of Canada. Office, 93 Hollis Street. (See under names of lines).

HAMBURG

Principal port of Germany and terminus for a joint service for cabin and third class steamers of the American Line and White Star Line. Rail connections are excellent to interior points. Office, 39 Alsterdamm. (See also "American Line," " White Star Line ").

HAVANA

" The Paris of the Caribbean," is a port of call for the Panama Pacific Line's steamers plying between New York and California ports. Ships leaving New York on Thursday reach Havana on Monday morning. Eastbound ships arrive usually in the afternoon of the fourth day from the Panama Canal. In each case a stop of about six hours is made, affording passengers an opportunity to see some of the interesting features of this gay and colorful city of narrow streets, bright cafes and flat-roofed houses of soft pink and blue stucco—a city with a distinctly Spanish flavor.

Visitors will find it well worth while to see the Cathedral; the Prado, a broad thoroughfare of shops, clubs and hotels; the Botanical Gardens and historic old Morro Castle and Cabafias fortress, guarding the harbor entrance. An auto trip to lovely nearby suburbs should also be taken. For visitors making a longer stay the races, the bathing beaches and holiday fiestas are great attractions.

HAVERFORD

White Star Line steamship for cabin and third class passengers. 11,635 tons gross; length, 550 feet; breadth, 59 feet; twin screws. Noted for steadiness and unusually broad promenade deck; staterooms on one deck. Public rooms all on promenade deck. White Stat Line cuisine and service. Has large and devoted following. (See also "Ships ").

HOMERIC

White Star Line's "Ship of Splendor"; 6th largest in world. Oil burner, 34,354 tons gross; length, 777 feet; breadth, 83 feet; twin screws. Plys between New York, Cherbourg and Southampton with the Majestic and Olympic, in "The Magnificent Trio." Carries first, second and third class passengers. Noted for luxury of appointments. Lofty public rooms en suite on upperdeck include music room and six other magnificent apartments. Period suites with private sitting rooms and baths. Beds replace berths in staterooms; gymnasiums, electric baths, elevators, sports deck. Large orchestra plays in concerts and for dancing. Splendid ballroom. Second and third class have their own public rooms. (See also "Ships").

HOTELS IN EUROPE

The hotels in Europe vary widely in scale of prices according to grade, as first class, second, third, and whether in large cities or smaller towns. The American abroad should not be disturbed by the term "class."

A second class hotel often is as comfortable as a first class. Some of the most attractive inns in Europe would be rated "fourth class" by their scale of prices. There are many good pensions where one can live in comfort at moderate cost. Cooking and service in Europe are generally good. The hall porter in English hotels, and the concierge in Continental hotels furnishes information to travelers.

In England the "temperance hotels" largely patronized by tourists and colonials, will be found cheaper than the large hotels. On the Continent do not be afraid to bargain for hotel accommodation. The most expensive rooms usually are offered first. A reduction is usually made for a prolonged stay. Hotel coupons may be purchased through tourist agencies. good for accommodations at specified hotels.

Continental hotels usually make a charge for light and attendance. Some hotels add 10 per cent to cover fees to servants, obviating guest's giving them. (See also " Boarding Houses").

HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Household goods, merchandise, linens, silver, etc., should be shipped as freight on transatlantic steamers. The Panama Pacific Line, New York to California, also accepts household goods in vans, which are taken on board the ship for delivery to destination. For rates apply to company offices.

INCOME TAX CLEARANCE

Income tax clearance is necessary for all aliens leaving the United States; obtainable from the Supervising Internal Revenue Agent, Custom House, New York, or other port of depatture, in exchange for documentary proof that income tax has been paid ; must be presented to representative of Internal Revenue Department at pier befote embarking. Income tax clearance is not necessary for American citizens.

INFORMATION

Information as to routes, rates, distances. etc., will be furnished by company offices or by purser or passenger department representative on steamer. Time tables, travel booklets, etc. are carried on ships and directories of New York, London and Paris on the larger steamers.

INQUIRY OFFICE ON STEAMERS

This is the business office of the ship, where letters are mailed, cables and radios despatched, and all business of the voyage conducted. Passengers may purchase return tickets or make reservations here, or on the larger ships at the passenger representative's office.

INTERPRETERS

Interpreters for the principal languages of Europe are carried on all our steamers. Stewards on steamers to the Continent speak two or more languages. Interpreters from tourist agencies meet most steamships and important trains. (See also "Languages").

KEYS

Keys to staterooms are not furnished to passengers. A steward is on duty in each section and maintains careful supervision over rooms.

KROONLAND

Panama Pacific Line steamship; formerly in the Red Star Line's New York-Antwerp service; one of three largest steamships engaged in intercoastal service between New York and California ports; 12,241 tons gross; length, 578 feet; breadth, 60 feet; twin screw; oil burner; runs via the Panama Canal. Carries first, second and third class passengers. Noted for homelike comfort. Many two-berth and connecting rooms, some with private bath. Electric fans in all staterooms. Orchestra. Swimming pool on deck.

LANDING ARRANGEMENTS

Landing cards issued to passengers by the purser are stamped by the immigration and health authorities at port of entrance and collected as passengers land. Cabin passengers are passed by the authorities at the dock and allowed to land immediately. Third class passengers are transferred to an immigration station.

At all ports should the steamet dock in the evening passengers may temain on board until morning. At Cherbourg passengers are landed by tender up to 12 midnight, or if the ship arrives later, at 7 A. M. At Southampton, when justified by the number of passengers, a special train will be dispatched for London, if able to leave before 9.30 P.M. (See also "Customs" and " Baggage ").

 

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