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Articles Written By or About the Cunard Line

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  • Liability for Losses At Sea: A Case Growing Out of the Atlantic Wreck in 1873
    In the suit of Freeman D. Marckwald against the Oceanic Steam Navigation Company, (Limited) which was begun on Monday before Judge Westbrook and a jury in Supreme Court, Circuit, Part II, the plaintiff yesterday rested his case.
  • 1904-06-11 An Explanation of Wireless Telegraphy
    This article on Wireless Telegraphy was included in the 11 June 1904 Passenger List for the Cunard Line Steamship Etruria on a Westbound voyage from Liverpool to New York.
  • 1904-10-11 Deep Sea Journalism - Keeping Passengers Informed via Marconi's Wireless Telegraphy - Discusses how the Cunard Daily Bulletin began.
    This article from 1904 discusses the improvement in reporting and the change in publishing the on board newpaper - the "Cunard Daily Bulletin" originally published once during each voyage to being published daily due to the introduction of Marconi's Wireless Telegraphy.
  • 1906 Turbine Steamers in the Cross-Channel Service
    The passenger accommodation is all that can be desired, and passengers leaving London either by the 11 a.m. service from Victoria to Calais or by the 2.20 p.m. service from Charing Cross to Boulogne can now rely on a turbine steamer being on these services.
  • 19 June 1913 Account of the Arrival of the R.M.S. Laconia in Boston
    Bringing 1830 passengers, including many American tourists, the Laconia of the Cunard Line, Capt. W. R. D. Irvine, reached port this morning from Liverpool and Queenstown.  She was delayed at quarantine about an hour, and it was after 9 o'clock when she swung into her berth at East Boston, where several hundred people had gathered to welcome friends.
  • 1918 The Sinking of the Cunard Laconia

    Excerpt from the book by Floyd Gibbons, "And They Thought We Wouldn't Fight", © 1918 George H. Doran Company, New York. Edited by the Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives for clarity.

    The Cunard Line R.M.S. Laconia, launched in 1912 was a beautiful ship that became a fatality of the first world war. This is a first-hand account by Chicago Tribune reporter Floyd Gibbons, who later bacame a war correspondent.

  • 1921-12 Christmas on the Cunard Line R.M.S. Aquitania
    "Christmas knows neither caste nor class. It establishes itself as part of the ship's schedule for a full twenty-four hours, and the Patron Saint of the Day succeeds to command in all matters, except the purely technical function of navigation, with the full approval and consent of the Captain and the general endorsement of all others."
  • Big Cunard Developments (1922)
    Important announcements concerning greatly extended services and new ships in commission, are made by the Cunard Company, and these plans, in view of their magnitude are likely to have considerable effect upon ocean travel.
  • 1924-12 Christmas Dinner at Sea
    The Modern Kitchen Arrangements ensure Good Service, which is vastly different to the Old Days. In his " American Notes " Charles Dickens gives his readers an excellent impression of what Atlantic travel, with special reference to the dining arrangements, was like in the early 'forties. What a pity it is the famous author did not cross the Atlantic during the festive season of Christmas, for had he done so, we are sure that by means of his wonderful descriptive powers he would have presented succeeding generations with a vivid pen picture of how the Christmas dinner was cooked.

 

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