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BEEF - Cuts, Types, Recipes and Definitions

BEEF—For culinary purposes is of two kinds, the steer and the cow. Steer beef is superior and the flesh should be of a bright red marble with yellow fat, and a thick outside layer of fat under a fine grained skin; the lean should be firm and elastic when pressed with the fingers; the suet should be dry and crumble easily.

Cow beef is of closer grain, the fat is white instead of yellow, and the flesh of a darker red, BULL beef is sometimes worked off on the unwary by the packing houses when shipping to distant cities, especially so in the form of tenderloins; it is large, coarse, very dark in color, and unfit for table use.

BEEF a la MODE—Any piece of solid beef, preferably the silverside of the round, is larded with seasoned strips of larding pork, then laid in dilute vinegar containing slices of carrot, turnips and onions with whole spices, for several hours. It is then taken out and quickly roasted in oven to get the outside seared, then placed in saucepan, covered with a piquante sauce, lid of saucepan put on, then gently simmered till tender; served in slices with a garnish of braised vegetables and some of the sauce it was cooked in, (also called, "pot roast" and "sour pot roast.")

BEEF STEW, GERMAN STYLE—Cold beef a la mode is cut into small pieces and heated in a sour sauce; served garnished with potato pancakes.

BEEF ROAST—Preferably the set, or seven ribs from the shoulder to the loin is for hotel use. The lower end of the ribs, called SHORTRIBS, should be roasted with another pan over the top, so as to become more juicy and tender than by roasting them open. The usual accompaniment to roast beef is some of the pan or dish gravy with a slice of Yorkshire pudding, while for the shortribs a little grated horseradish and browned potatoes is best.

BOILED BEEF—The best pieces for boiling are the flank, brisket, and short ribs, they should be boiled tender with a flavoring of vegetables, and served with horseradish sauce, cream sauce and carrots or suet dumplings, or mixed vegetables such as carrot, turnip, onion, cabbage and potato.

CORNED BEEF—Flank, short ribs, brisket or rump of beef is put to soak in brine made of twenty-five pounds of salt, twelve ounces of rock saltpetre, two pounds of sugar and fifteen gallons of water, all boiled together, skimmed, cooled, the beef then put in with a cover on and a weight on that to keep the beef under the brine, (ready for use in a week to ten days).

BOILED CORNED BEEF—The meat put to boil in cold water, scum taken off as it rises, then allowed to simmer till tender (about four hours) served in slices with cabbage, parsnips, carrots, sometimes with all three vegetables; also with suet dumplings; sometimes with a brown sauce and garnished with brussels sprouts.

SPICED BEEF-A whole flank of beef with bones, gristle and inner skin removed, laid out flat, outside skin downwards, then rubbed with a mixture of salt, ground pepper, mace, allspice, cloves and ginger; rolled up and tied, then put to soak for ten days with some pickle from the corned beef brine to which is added whole cloves, peppers, allspice and bay leaves.

When to be cooked, it is taken from the pickle, wiped dry, dipped in fat that is near cool so as to take on a good coating, then rolled in a dough made of plain flour and water, placed in a medium oven and slowly baked (five to six hours). If to be served hot, cut in slices and serve with piquante sauce and garnish with small cut vegetables. If to be served cold, as is generally done, the dough is left on till thoroughly cold, or till to be served; even for a month it will not spoil if the dough is not disturbed. Served cold in thin slices garnished with pickles.

ALL SALT, CORNED OR SMOKED MEATS IF SIMMERED TILL DONE, INSTEAD OF QUICK BOILING, and allowed to cool in the water they were simmered in, will be found always more juicy and tender, and capable of longer keeping.

DRIED BEEF—The thick flank is the part generally used; divided lengthwise in its natural section, it is put in a pickle of salt, saltpetre, sugar and molasses for two weeks, then hung up and smoked like hams, (also called smoked beef).

CHIPPED BEEF IN CREAM—Very thin slices or shavings of dried beef, blanched, drained, and mixed into cream sauce or reduced cream.

SCRAMBLED BEEF WITH EGGS—Very thin slices of dried beef, again cut into strips like short matches, blanched, drained, mixed with beaten eggs and a little milk, scrambled around in a pan with a little butter till eggs are set, served either plain, or on toast.

FRIZZLED BEEF ON TOAST—Very thin slices of dried beef, blanched, drained, then tossed with frothing butter over a quick fire; served on toast.

SMOKED BEEF WITH SPINACH — Dried beef put to boil in cold water, scum taken off as it rises, then simmered till tender; served in slices on a bed of spinach.

SMOKED BEEF SANDWICHES — Very thin slices of dried beef placed on thin slices of buttered brown bread, rolled up like fingers.

BRISKET OF BEEF WITH VEGETABLES —Lean brisket of beef boned, placed in saucepan with carrot, onions, turnip, celery, parsley, thyme, bay leaves, whole cloves and mace, covered with stock, saucepan cover put on, simmered till tender, taken up and placed on baking pan, little gravy poured over, put in quick oven till gravy has glazed the meat; served in slices with glazed vegetables and brown sauce.

FLANK OF BEEF, ENGLISH STYLE—Lean flank of beef that has been in corned beef brine for a few days, is washed, then put to boil in cold water with carrots, onions, and celery; after coming to the boil, skimmed, then simmered till tender, taken up and glazed in oven like the preceding, served in slices with a suet dumpling, brussels sprouts, shaped piece of carrot and turnip, a boiled onion, and some piquante sauce poured around.

GLAZED RIBS OF BEEF WITH MACARONI—Lean short ribs of beef larded through the lean with seasoned strips of larding pork; put in sauce pan with carrot, onion, celery, parsley, whole cloves and mace with a little garlic, covered with consomme and sherry wine, cover put on, then simmered till tender, meat then taken up, the liquor strained, skimmed, and reduced, half of which is taken to moisten some boiled and drained macaroni, mixed with grated Parmesan cheese. The beef served in portions, garnished with the macaroni, and a spoonful of the remaining glaze poured over the meat, (called, BRAISED BEEF it la PIEMONTAISE).

GLAZED RIBS OF BEEF WITH VEGETABLES—The lean short ribs of beef cooked same as in the preceding receipt, served in portion pieces, garnished with glazed shapes of carrot, turnip, onions and artichokes, with a little of the glaze poured over the meat, (called, BRAISED BEEF a la BOURGEOISE).

GLAZED RIBS OF BEEF WITH POTATO CROQUETTES — Lean short ribs of beef larded through the lean with strips of seasoned larding pork; put in a sauce pan with a few shallots, half a cup of fresh grated horseradish, parsley and green onions, the meat barely covered with consomme to which is added a bottle of Rhine wine, then simmered till tender and glazy; when done, meat taken up, the liquor strained and skimmed, little red currant jelly and grated orange rind added to it and reduced; the meat served in portion cuts, with a little of the glaze poured over, and garnished with potato croquette mixture rolled into small balls, dipped in beaten eggs, then in flour and fried very quickly in hot fat (called, BRAISED BEEF a la BADEN-BADEN).

BRAISED BEEF, GERMAN STYLE — A top sirloin of beef larded slantwise with strips of seasoned larding pork, put in sauce pan with carrot, onions. celery, parsley, bay leaves and a few caraway seeds, barely covered with stock and simmered till tender and glazy, then taken up, the liquor strained, skimmed and reduced to glaze, the meat served in slices with a little of the glaze and garnished with sauerkraut and small shaped potatoes boiled and sprinkled with parsley butter (called, BRAISED BEEF l'ALLEMANDE.)

BRAISED SIRLOIN OF BEEF, GARNISHED —The braised sirloin of the preceding, but the caraway seeds omitted in the seasonings; when done is served in slices and garnished with stoned olives, mushrooms, truffles, cockscombs and kernels, green peas and small pieces of sweetbreads, all made hot in the glaze with the addition of a little Espagnole sauce (called, BRAISED BEEF a la FINANCIERE).

BRAISED BEEF WITH RAVIOLIS—Top sirloin of beef larded, put in sauce pan with carrot, onions, celery, thyme, bay leaves, cloves, allspice, garlic, claret wine and enough consomme to barely cover the meat, simmered till tender and glazy, taken up, liquor strained, skimmed and reduced to a glaze; meat served in slices with some of the glaze and garnished with small molds of boiled macaroni sprinkled with Parmersan cheese and small raviolis, (called, BRAISED BEEF a la MILANAISE).

BRAISED SIRLOIN OF BEEF WITH QUENELLES—Top sirloin larded and braised with vegetables, spices and consomme; served in slices and garnished with a ragout of small quenelles of poultry or game, cockscombs and kernels, and slices of braised poultry livers (called, BRAISED BEEF a la RICHELIEU).

BRAISED SIRLOIN OF BEEF WITH MUSHROOMS—Top sirloin larded and braised with vegetables, spices and consomme; meat taken up when done, the liquor strained and skimmed, sherry wine and Espagnole sauce added to it; meat served in slices, garnished with fried mushrooms, and sauce poured around.

BRAISED SIRLOIN OF BEEF WITH TRUFFLES—Top sirloin larded and braised, meat taken up when done, the liquor strained, skimmed, Madeira wine added to it and reduced; meat served in slices, garnished with a ragout of truffles, diced sweetbreads, and small veal quenelles (called, BRAISED BEEF a la GODARD).

BRAISED SIRLOIN WITH RICE CROQUETTES—Top sirloin larded and braised, meat taken up, liquor strained and reduced to a glaze, meat served in slices with some of the glaze poured around, and garnished with small croquettes of rice that have been seasoned with savory herbs and meat glaze, (called, BRAISED BEEF 'a l'ORSINI).

BRAISED SIRLOIN WITH SPRING VEGETABLES—Top sirloin larded and braised, taken up when done, liquor strained, skimmed and reduced to a glaze; meat served in slices with it, and garnished with glazed carrot, onion, brussels sprouts and red or green cabbage, (called, BRAISED BEEF a la FLAMANDE)

BRAISED SIRLOIN WITH STUFFED POTATOES—Top sirloin larded and braised, taken up when done, liquor strained, skimmed, and reduced to a glaze; meat served in slices with it, and garnished with potatoes that have been cut out with the largest size potato scoop, centre taken out of the potatoes with a column cutter, blanched, drained, the holes filled with a savory forcemeat, then baked till done and brown with butter, (called, BRAISED BEEF a la BIGNONNE).

BRAISED SIRLOIN WITH HORSERADISH —Top sirloin larded and braised, taken up when done, the liquor strained, skimmed and added to it is Espagnole sauce, red currant jelly. horseradish, grated lean ham, port wine and Harvey sauce; it is then rapidly boiled down to glaze; meat served in slices with some of the sauce, and garnished with steamed artichoke bottoms, filled with grated fresh horseradish, (called, BRAISED BEEF a la NAPOLITAINE).

BRAISED SIRLOIN WITH STUFFED TOMATOES—Top sirloin larded and braised, taken up when done, the liquor strained, skimmed, and mixed with Espagnole sauce, minced fried mushrooms and sherry wine, then rapidly reduced to a glaze; the meat served in slices with some of the sauce, and garnished with stuffed tomatoes and stuffed glazed onions, (called, BRAISED BEEF a la PRO VENCALE)

TENDERLOIN OF BEEF WITH MUSHROOMS—Tenderloin roasted with some sliced vegetables in the pan, mushrooms lightly fried in butter, then put into a rich brown sauce containing sherry wine; the meat served in slices and garnished with the mushrooms in sauce.

TENDERLOIN OF BEEF WITH VEGETABLES - -Tenderloin trimmed, larded and braised, the liquor strained, skimmed and mixed with a rich brown sauce containing sherry or madeira wine, reduced to a half glaze; carrots, turnips and celery are cut into neat pieces, boiled separately in white consomme with a little sugar and butter, when done strained and mixed together with some French peas; meat served in slices with some of the sauce and garnished with the vegetables (called, FILLET OF BEEF a la JARDINIERE).

When the vegetables are cut into minute squares and diamonds it is (called, a la PRINTANIERE) When the vegetables are scooped out with a medium sized scoop it is (called, a la PARISIENNE).

When taken out of cans or cut in very small fancy shapes and mixed with French string beans cut small and flageolets it is (called a la MACEDOINE).

When carrots, turnips, celery, leeks and onions are cut in strips like matches, it is called, b. la JULIENNE).

When the Julienne vegetables are mixed with a Hollandaise, Allemande or yellow cream sauce it is (called, a la NIVERNAISE).

[It is optional with the cook whether he adds asparagus points and small flowerets of cauliflower to the above groups of vegetables, it is still a simple garniture of vegetables, appropriate to either braised or roasted tenderloin, understood by the guest when written in plain English, and often uncalled for and consequently left over when the "a la" is attached. Any of the foregoing garnitures given to braised sirloins, apply equally to braised tenderloins of beef and need not be repeated under the heading of tenderloin; also the vegetable garnitures above given are equally appropriate to braised sirloins of beef.]

TENDERLOIN OF BEEF, SAUCE BEARNAISE—Tenderloin trimmed and larded is
either braised or roasted with vegetables; served in slices with Bearnaise sauce.

TENDERLOIN OF BEEF WITH CUSTARDS —Tenderloin larded and either braised or roasted with vegetables, served in slices with a half glaze containing Madeira or Malaga wine. Garnished with slices or small molds of custards made of stirred yolks of eggs mixed with very small cut vegetables of various colors and a little consomme; this vegetable custard is then poured into a pan or small mold and placed in a pan containing water, then, with a sheet of buttered paper over the mold, the pan is put in the oven and the custard cooked, (called, FILET a la TALLEYRAND).

TENDERLOIN OF BEEF WITH CEPES — Tenderloin trimmed, larded, and either braised or roasted with vegetables; the cepes drained from the oil in the cans, cut into slices, lightly fried in butter, taken up and added to a rich brown sauce, served with slices of the meat.

TENDERLOIN OF BEEF WITH ARTICHOKES—Tenderloin trimmed, larded, and either braised or roasted with vegetables, served in slices, garnished with artichoke bottoms filled with a ragout of truffles, mushrooms and strips of smoked tongue (called, FILLET OF BEEF a la BAYARD).

TENDERLOIN OF BEEF WITH STUFFED PEPPERS—Tenderloin larded and roasted, served in slices with a little Andalusian sauce poured around, and garnished with a stuffed tomato at one end, and a stuffed green pepper at the other, (called, FILLET OF BEEF a l'ANDALOUSE).

TENDERLOIN STEAK, BORDELAISE —Steak broiled and served with a brown Bordelaise sauce, or with some finely minced shallots, garlic and parsley fried in oil and butter, with lemon juice added at the finish; garnished with chips.

TENDERLOIN STEAK, PARISIAN POTATOES—Steak broiled and served with some maitre d'hôtel butter poured over it and garnished with Parisian potatoes.

TENDERLOIN STEAK, SAUCE BEARNAISE —Steak broiled and served with Bearnaise
sauce at one end, and Julienne potatoes with a sprig of parsley at the other.

FILLETS OF BEEF WITH STRING BEANS —Tenderloin steaks larded on one side, broiled, served with French string beans made hot in maitre d'hôtel butter at one end, and a slice of fancy toast at the other.

FILLETS OF BEEF, SAUCE PROVENCALE —Tenderloin steaks larded on one side, broiled, served with some provençale sauce poured around the steak, and a small stuffed tomato at each end.

TENDERLOIN STEAK SAUTEED, WITH PEPPERS—Steak sautéed in butter; minced green peppers fried in butter, drained, mixed into brown sauce, served around the steak with a stuffed green pepper at each end, and some neat slices of pimentoes decorating the top of the steak.

TENDERLOIN STEAK,SAUCE PERIGUEUX —Steak broiled, served with sauce perigueux poured around it, top of steak decorated with slices of truffles, a few chip potatoes at one end of the dish, and a fancy crouton with a sprig of parsley at the other end.

HAMBURG STEAK WITH ONIONS—Minced raw beef and onions seasoned with salt and pepper, mixed thoroughly and formed into flat balls or steaks, fried in butter till done, served either plain or with a sauce.

TOMATOED HAMBURG STEAK — Minced raw beef and solid meat of the tomatoes seasoned with salt and pepper, thoroughly mixed and formed into steaks; either broiled or fried in butter; served with tomato sauce poured around.

SALISBURY STEAK WITH GRILLED POTATOES—Minced raw beef seasoned with salt and pepper made into form of steaks, either broiled, or fried in butter; served garnished with sliced broiled potatoes (plain or sweet) and some maitre d'hôtel butter on the steak.

SALISBURY STEAK WITH MUSHROOMS—Prepared and cooked same as the preceding; served with some fried mushrooms at one end of the dish, and chip potatoes at the other.

ENGLISH BEEF SOUP—Pieces of raw beef cut small, with carrots, turnips, onions and celery cut in dice, placed in soup pot with butter and lightly fried, flour then added and stirred to form a roux, moistened with boiling beef stock; when about half done, pearl barley is washed and added to the soup, also some whole allspice, peppers, cloves, thyme and bay leaves tied in a piece of muslin; when the soup is finished, the spices removed, seasoned with worcestershire sauce and chopped parsley. SOME COOKS ARE IN THE HABIT OF PUTTING TOMATOES IN THIS SOUP, WHICH IS DECIDEDLY WRONG.

BEEF BROTH WITH CELERY—Into the soup pot is placed plenty of roast beef bones and clear gravy with slices of carrot, onions, roots and trimmings of celery; filled up with strong beef stock, simmered till done, strained and skimmed; meanwhile celery cut in inch strips like matches is fried lightly in butter, then simmered till tender and added to the soup.

SCOTCH BEEF SOUP—Prepared exactly the same as "English beef soup" above, except using Scotch oatmeal (procurable anywhere) instead of pearl barley, and adding Madeira wine at the finish.

BEEF BROTH WITH RICE—Prepared as for "beef broth with celery," but after the broth is strained and skimmed, allowed to boil up again, thickened lightly with corn starch, and well washed boiled rice added with a seasoning of walnut catsup.

BEEF BOUILLON WITH CRUSTS —Plenty of cold roast beef bones and clear gravy put into the soup pot with some chopped fresh beef, NO SPICES, but a carrot and onion; filled up with good beef stock, simmered for several hours, then strained through a consomme cloth, skimmed, seasoned with salt and pepper, served with small toast. Also served plain in cups with a thin slice of lemon.

OX TAIL, THICK—Prepare the "bouillon" above; ox tails cut in slices half inch thick, carrots and turnips cored out with large sized column cutter and sliced to resemble the tails but thinner, all placed with sliced onions in soup pot and fried lightly with butter or beef drippings, flour added to form a roux, moistened with the boiling bouillon, simmered till done, skimmed, seasoned with salt, pepper, Worcestershire sauce and sherry wine.

OX TAIL CLEAR— Prepare the "bouillon" above and place it on the fire with some trimmings of carrot, turnip, onions and celery, also the thick and thin ends of the tails that have been previously browned in the oven, simmered till done, then strained and clarified, the middle part of the oxtails cut in slices with carrot and turnip to match, boiled separately in consomme till tender and glazy, added to the clarified broth with sherry wine.

BEEF CROQUETTES WITH PEAS—A strong roast beef gravy thickened with roux and seasoned with worcestershire sauce is then reduced till thick, cold roast or other cooked beef is cut very small and stirred into the boiling sauce; when thoroughly heated through it is turned into a pan about an inch deep, smoothed with a knife, covered with a sheet of buttered paper and allowed to become cold, then divided into pieces of the size required, rolled into finger lengths, breaded and fried, served in twos laid slantwise across the dish, seasoned green peas placed between them, and mushroom sauce at each end, with croquette frills stuck in the croquettes if used.

BEEF COLLOPS WITH MUSHROOMS —Cold cooked beef is trimmed and cut in circles size of a dollar but thicker, made hot in a thick rich beef gravy; served overlapping each other down the centre of the dish, with some fried mushrooms in sauce down both sides, and a fancy crouton at each end. This dish may also be served with a garnish of green peas, kidney beans, French string beans, mixed vegetables, small quenelles or fancy potatoes.

BEEF CAKES WITH EGG—Cold cooked beef minced and seasoned with salt and powdered savory, moistened slightly with roast beef gravy, made into cakes like Hamburg steaks, placed in pan with a glazy gravy poured over them; when thoroughly heated, served with a poached egg on top, and some thick roast beef gravy poured around.

BEEF CUTLETS WITH PIQUANTE SAUCE —The "beef croquette" mixture above, when cold formed in the shape of veal chops, using a piece of macaroni to imitate the bone; when shaped, rolled in flour, then dipped in beaten egg and fried in hot dripping; served with Piquante sauce poured around.

BEEF RISSOLES—Cold cooked beef minced three parts, grated bread crumbs one part, mixed and seasoned with herbs, grated lemon rind, salt and pepper, bound with raw yolks of eggs, made into shapes and size of eggs, breaded and fried; served with a mound of mashed potatoes in the centre of dish, a rissole at each end and side, with some thickened roast beef gravy poured around, and a sprig of parsley put into the potatoes. This dish may also be served with kidney beans, green peas, French string beans or mixed vegetables instead of the potatoes.

BEEF RISSOLETTES—Same as the preceding but made smaller, served and garnished the Same way.

BEEF PATTIES WITH MUSHROOMS—Cold cooked tender beef cut into small dice, mixed and made hot in a rich brown mushroom sauce, filled into patty shells; served with some fried mushrooms in sauce poured around.

BEEF STEAK AND MUSHROOM PIE—Pieces of raw beef cut about an inch square three parts, button mushrooms (fresh or canned) one part, mixed; baking dish lined on the sides with short paste, meat and mushrooms put in with a little flour, salt, pepper, a minced onion and savory herbs, filled up with water to just cover the meat, top crust put on, brushed over with beaten egg and milk, put in slow oven and gently baked.

BEEF STEAK AND OYSTER PIE—Same as the preceding, but omitting the mushrooms and using scalded oyster liquor instead of water; when to be served, a few blanched oysters kept hot in a brown sauce placed with each portion.

BEEF STEAK AND KIDNEY PIE—Same as "beef steak and mushroom pie" but using pieces of blanched beef kidney instead of the mushrooms.

BEEF POT PIE—A rich beef stew (white or brown) with vegetables, served with a dumpling and sprinkled with parsley; or the stew placed in a pan, soft dumpling mixture dropped in pieces all over it, put in oven and baked; or the stew left in the saucepan, dumplings put in, cover put on, then gently simmered till dumplings are cooked.

BEEF PAUPIETTES, MUSHROOM SAUCE — Thin slices of cold cooked beef, trimmed to shape of envelope with the flap open, spread with a cooked forcemeat composed of minced bacon, chopped parsley, grated lemon rind, salt, pepper and savory herbs, rolled up from the broad end to the point, this pinned with a toothpick, dipped in a thin batter and fried, toothpick then removed; served with a rich mushroom sauce poured around.

SCALLOPED BEEF WITH OYSTERS—Small pieces of beef already made tender in a brown stew seasoned with anchovy essence; oysters scalded and mixed with the stew, placed in scallop shells or dishes, sprinkled with bread crumbs and Parmesan cheese, baked in oven and served.

DEVILLED BEEF WITH OYSTERS — Cold cooked tender beef cut in finger lengths an inch wide and half inch thick, laid in a mixture of salt, pepper, olive oil and Worcertsrshire sauce for an hour, then lightly fried in butter, sprinkled with parsley; served on slices of buttered toast same size as the meat alternately with broiled oysters, and Diable sauce poured around.

CURRIED BEEF WITH RICE—Either raw or cooked beef rolled in flour, then fried in butter with minced onions; when lightly browned, put in sauce pan with butter, flour and curry powder, stirred and moistened with white stock, boiled up, skimmed, then simmered with the addition of a grated green apple, lemon juice and a little chutney; when done, the meat removed to another saucepan, and the sauce strained over it; served with a border of dry boiled rice.

MINCED BEEF WITH EGG—Either minced or finely cut cold cooked beef seasoned with savory herbs, salt and pepper is made hot in rich roast beef gravy, just enough to moisten the meat only being used; served with a fancy border of mashed potatoes, the mince in the centre, and a poached egg on top of the mince.

ROAST BEEF HASH—Minced onion lightly fried in butter added to finely cut roast beef two parts, and minced cold potatoes one part, mixed together, seasoned with salt, pepper and powdered marjoram with a very little roast beef gravy; the whole then tossed together, placed in a pan and baked; or kept in a sauce, pan over a slow fire till thoroughly heated; or portions put into a frying pan, browned on both sides, then formed into shape of an omelet; served either with or without a fried or poached egg, and with a croaton at ends of dish.

CORNED BEEF HASH—Prepared, (onion optional) cooked, and served the same way as "roast beef hash" above, but omitting the herb, and using corned instead of roast beef.

SPICED JELLIED BEEF—Leg of beef freed from all bone, cut up in two inch pieces, put to boil in cold water, all scum taken off as it rises, then gently simmered till the meat falls to pieces; the liquor then strained from the meat, put to boil again for half an hour with savory herbs, salt and pepper, then strained, skimmed from all fat, and while cooling a very little gelatine dissolved in it, the meat shredded and added to it, poured into molds to get perfectly cold and firm; served in slices garnished with thinly sliced green pickles.

POTTED BEEF FOR SANDWICHES —Lean roast or other cold cooked beef trimmings three parts, cold corned lean beef one part, minced fine, then pounded to a paste with two ounces of cold boiled bacon to each pound of beef, season with salt, pepper, ground mace and a very little anchovy essence; when in paste form, weigh it, then work in melted butter at the rate of two ounces to the pound; after thoroughly mixing, the paste is put away in jars with a one-quarter of an inch of melted butter poured over the top to seal them from air, (this mixture kept sealed will keep many weeks without spoiling.)

TOURNEDOS OF BEEF WITH OLIVES—Cold cooked beef tenderloin trimmed to a pear shape, slices of stale bread trimmed the same way, both cut in slices half an inch thick, the bread fried, the meat made hot in a Piquante sauce; served on the toast, garnished with slices of stoned olives, and the sauce poured around.

MIROTON OF BEEF WITH VEGETABLES —Cold cooked tender beef cut in circular pieces two inches in diameter and half an inch thick, sliced onions par-boiled, then fried a golden color in butter, the meat arranged in a pan and just covered with a brown Italian sauce, the onions spread over the whole, placed in oven and baked till the sauce is reduced to a glaze with a buttered paper over the onions; the circles, with the onions still on them, served garnished with a mixture of small cut cooked vegetables in brown sauce, and a fancy crouton at each end of the dish.

EMINCE OF BEEF WITH PEAS—Thin slices of tender cooked beef about the size of half dollars, made hot in a rich thickened roast beef gravy, served overlapping each other down the centre of the dish and the green peas as a border.

SCALLOPS OF BEEF, SAUCE TRIANON — Evenly cut thin slices of cold cooked beef tenderloin sauteed with minced shallots in butter; served overlapping each other down the centre of dish, with a sauce Trianon down each side, and a fancy crouton at each end of the dish.

TENDERLOIN WITH BLOOD GRAVY — Thick tenderloin steak placed between two inferior steaks, then broiled till done, the tenderloin served on a hot dish with the gravy of the other two squeezed over it, garnished wit fancy potatoes, sprigs of parsley, and slices of lemon, (called, FILET a la CHATEAUBRIAND.)

SAUTE OF BEEF, TRUFFLE SAUCE—Small tenderloin steaks, seasoned, then fried in butter, served garnished with a crouton at each end of dish, and truffle sauce poured around the steak, with some slices of truffles on top (called, MIGNONS DE BOEUF AUX TRUFFES).

SMALL FILLETS OF BEEF WITH OYSTERS—Small tenderloin steaks, seasoned, then fried in butter, large oysters scalded, then tossed quickly over a fire in maitre d'hôtel butter containing a little anchovy essence; the fillets served in the centre of the dish garnished with the oysters, and their sauce poured around.

SMALL FILLETS OF BEEF, maitre d'hotelSmall tenderloin steaks, seasoned, than fried in butter, served garnished with fancy fried potatoes, and maitre d'hôtel butter poured over the steak. These may also be garnished with a mixture of small cut vegetables.

RAGOUT OF BEEF, CREOLE SAUCE —Small pieces of beef simmered till tender in tomato sauce containing chopped sweet peppers, minced shallots, and a small quantity of madeira wine and madeira sauce; served with the sauce around, and croutons at end of the dish.

BRAISED BEEF TONGUE WITH TOMATOES—Fresh tongue soaked in cold water over night, put on in boiling water and blanched for ten minutes, taken up, root and superfluous fat trimmed away, placed in sautoir with carrot, onions, celery, parsley, whole cloves and mace, covered with stock, and gently simmered till tender, then taken up and placed in another saucepan, the braise strained, skimmed, reduced to a glaze with the addition of some madeira sauce, this poured over the tongue; served in slices with some sauce poured around, and a stuffed tomato at each end.

SMOKED TONGUE WITH SPINACH—The tongue soaked over night, put on to boil in cold water and simmered for an hour, taken up, placed in a sautoir with some vegetables and covered with stock, then simmered till tender; served in slices on a bed of spinach, with madeira sauce poured around.

SMOKED TONGUE WITH SAUER KRAUT —The tongue soaked over night, put on to boil in cold water and simmered for an hour, taken up, placed in saucepan with some well washed sauer kraut, an onion stuck with cloves, carrot, and a bunch of parsley, moistened with stock to cover the whole, then simmered till tender; served in slices on a bed of the kraut, and garnished with glazed young carrots, with some Poivrade sauce around.

CORNED BEEF TONGUE WITH SPINACH —The tongue put to boil in cold water and simmered till tender, taken up, skinned, and kept in hot broth; served in slices on a bed of spinach with some Espagnole sauce poured around. Brussels sprouts, or a jardiniere or macedoine of vegetables, form an appropriate garniture to boiled corned tongue; also the tongue served plain with either raisin or Hollandaise sauce.

BOILED BEEF HEART WITH HORSERADISH—The heart washed and freed from blood, boiled till tender in white stock with whole mace, carrot and onions; served in slices with horseradish sauce poured around, and garnished with a small white turnip hollowed out, steamed, and filled with grated horseradish, or the turnip may be boiled with a little carmine in the water, giving it a reddish color.

ROAST BEEF HEART, STUFFED—The heart prepared and boiled till tender, as above; taken up, drained, the cavities cut out and the space filled with a sage and onion stuffing, placed in pan with brown sauce poured over it and baked till glazy; served in slices on a bed of the stuffing with some sauce poured around, and garnished with potato balls at one end and French beans at the other.

BEEF KIDNEY SAUTE—The kidneys cut in small pieces, put to boil in cold water, when blanched, poured into colander, washed and drained, then lightly fried in butter, sprinkled with flour, moistened with stock, simmered till tender, seasoned with salt, pepper and lemon juice; served with a border of potatoes on the dish, kidneys in the centre, sprinkled with chopped parsley.

BEEF KIDNEY SOUP — The kidneys cut small and prepared the same way as "kidney sauté." The soup made of thin Espagnole, the kidneys and their sauce added at the finish; served with small toast.

BRAISED OX TAILS WITH KIDNEY BEANS —The thick end of the tail is cut into portion pieces and placed in saucepan with carrot, onions, celery, bay leaves, thyme and parsley, covered with stock and simmered till tender and glazy, then taken up, the liquor strained, skimmed and added to a Madeira sauce, poured over the tails; served with a border of green kidney beans, and a fancy crouton at each end of dish.

HARICOT OF OX TAILS—The tails cut into pieces at the natural joints, fried with onions in a saucepan till onions are of a golden color, flour added to form a roux, moistened with stock, allowed to simmer for an hour, skimmed, turnips and carrots cut about size of the joints are then added, and simmered another hour, then small potatoes of an even size are added; when they are done, season with salt, pepper and walnut catsup; served, the tails in the centre of the dish, garnished alternately with the vegetables, the whole sprinkled with chopped parsley.

CURRIED OX TAILS WITH SPAGHETTI—The tails cut into sections at the joints, fried with onions in a saucepan till onions are of a golden color, flour and curry powder added, shaken together, then moistened with stock, simmered till tender, meanwhile adding to the sauce a grated green apple, juice of a lemon and some chutney; when done, the tails taken up into another saucepan and the sauce strained over them; served with a border of boiled spaghetti cut in inch pieces, seasoned with Parmesan cheese.

BEEF SAUSAGES — Lean and fat raw beef trimmings two-thirds, soaked stale bread that is squeezed dry one-third, the meat is put through the chopping machine, then mixed with the bread and seasoned with salt, pepper, sage, thyme and a little farina, the whole is then put through the machine again; when it has all passed through cold water is added to the desired stiffness, the knife taken from the machine, filler screwed on; the salted skins having been softened in water, are blown and drawn on to the filler, meat placed in the machine, the skins filled and tied.

SAUSAGE CAKES WITH POTATOES—The sausage meat purchased or made as in the preceding recipe, formed into round cakes, and either fried or arranged in .a baking pan and baked till done; served on a bed of mashed potatoes with a little brown gravy poured around.

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