Browse The Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives Home Page

Cooking Processes - Broiling

Broiling is cooking over or in front of a clear fire. The food to be cooked is usually placed in a greased broiler or on a gridiron held near the coals, turned often at first to sear the outside, — thus preventing escape of inner juices,— afterwards turned occasionally. Tender meats and fish may be cooked in this way. The flavor obtained by broiling is particularly fine; there is, however, a greater loss of weight in this than in any other way of cooking, as the food thus cooked is exposed to free circulation of air. When coal is not used, or a fire is not in condition for broiling, a plan for pan broiling lias been adopted. This is done by placing food to be cooked in a hissing hot frying-pan, turning often as in broiling.

Fannie Merritt Farmer, The Boston Cooking-school Cook Book, Revised Edition, Boston: Little, Brown, and Company (1912), p. 19-20

Return to Top of Page