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Passenger List, American Line, S.S. Haverford, 11 November 1908

Cabin Passenger List for the S.S. Haverford of the American Line, Departing 11 November 1908 from Liverpool to New York via Queenstown (Cobh), Commanded by Captain Enoch Maddox.

Arrived in New York on 25 November 1908 (According to Morton Allan Direcotry).

There is a Lunch Menu from this voyage for the 21st of November.

List of Cabin Passengers

American Line

S.S. Haverford

Captain Enoch Maddox

From Liverpool to Philadelphia via Queenstown (Cobh)

November 11th, 1908

Ships List of Senior Officers

  1. Captain: Enoch Maddox
  2. Surgeon: G. H. Gill
  3. Chief Steward: B. J. Priest

List of Passengers

Passenger List, American Line S.S. Haverford, 1908, Liverpool to Philadelphia via Queenstown
  1. Mr. Joseph Arch
  2. Mr. J. G. Ayres
  3. Mr. H. Bamber
  4. Mr. James Bannon
  5. Mrs. Bannon
  6. Mrs. F. Barker
  7. Mr. Alfred Bayley
  8. Mr. E Berborn
  9. Mr. Arthur H. Berry
  10. Mrs. W. L. Berry
  11. Miss C. Lee Braine
  12. Mrs. Brown
  13. Miss A. Byrne
  14. Miss Margaret Carr
  15. Mr. Ed. E. Chandler
  16. Mrs. Chandler
  17. Mr. Lionel S. Craven
  18. Mr. Richard Davies
  19. Mrs. Davies and Infant
  20. Miss Florence B. Davies
  21. Mrs. W. B. Elliot
  22. Miss Adele Elliot
  23. Miss Myra Elliot
  24. Mr. George F. Ephgrave
  25. Miss Rebecca D. Ernst
  26. Miss Caroline Field
  27. Miss Hilda M. Flueck
  28. Mr. Wm. H. Fryatt
  29. Mrs. F. A. Garrett
  30. Mrs. H. Gill
  31. Mr. Henry N. Gillespie
  32. Miss Florence Godfrey
  33. Miss A. W. Graham
  34. Miss Irvine Gruff
  35. Mr. John C. Gunn
  36. Mr. Chas. D. Habliston
  37. Mrs. Habliston
  38. Mrs. C. H. Hill
  39. Miss Gladys Hill
  40. Mrs. J. M. Hillyar
  41. Mr. H. H. Hitt
  42. Mr. Tracey W. Holland
  43. Mrs. Holland
  44. Mr. Henry E. Jenkins
  45. Mrs. G. Kearney
  46. Miss Isabel Kearney
  47. Miss Gertrude Kearney
  48. Miss Janet Kearney
  49. Miss Marie K Kennedy
  50. Mr. Wm. Kimber
  51. Mrs. Kimber
  52. Master Kimber
  53. Miss Ethel Kimber
  54. Miss Harriet R. Krause
  55. Mr. Benjamin Lees
  56. Mr. Donald Lightbourne
  57. Mr. Ellis Lund
  58. Mr. R. P. Lundbek
  59. Miss Isabel D. Macdonald
  60. Miss Manley
  61. Mrs. J. H. McAllister
  62. Mr. Julian McCarthy
  63. Mrs. Chas. McCue
  64. Mrs. M. McGlade
  65. Mr. George McNulty
  66. Mr. Frank Mealin
  67. Mrs. Mealin
  68. Miss Minnie Mealin
  69. Mrs. Metcalf
  70. Miss Metcalf
  71. Mr. Henry U. Michie
  72. Mr. Telford H. Moss
  73. Miss J. Parke
  74. Mr. Houston H. Parsons
  75. Mrs. M. J. Penhollow
  76. Mrs. M. Percelle
  77. Mrs. S. J. Price
  78. Mrs. E. H. Randle
  79. Master Wm, D. Reagan
  80. Miss N. M. Rennyson
  81. Miss Mary E. Rice
  82. Mrs. Ida Ridgely
  83. Miss Alice L. Seal
  84. Mr. R. L. Sealby
  85. Miss Ada M. Thompson
  86. Miss Frances Thornton
  87. Mrs. Tyson
  88. Miss Louise Virtue
  89. Mr. Edward M. Wakefield
  90. Mrs. Wakefield
  91. Miss Cora Wheeland
  92. Mrs. Willard
  93. Miss Cath. L. Willard
  94. Mrs. G. E. Winslow
  95. Mrs. S. Winterbottom
  96. Miss Ada Winterbottom
  97. Mr. T. Howard Worth
  98. Miss E. Daisy Worth

Notice: Landing Arrangements at Philadelphia

Should the steamer arrive at the Philadelphia wharf after 8 p.m., Passengers have the option of remaining on board overnight and landing after breakfast on the following morning.

Reporting in Philadelphia.

The life of a newspaper man, like that of the policeman, is not always a happy one, as was shown a day of two ago when the American Line, steamship Haverford docked off Washington Avenue wharf. The vessel docked at 8 o'clock in the evening to permit the cabin Passengers to land. A certain reporter, was assigned to get the news of the ship's voyage.

Following the aggressiveness of his profession, the reporter went aboard the vessel, and while he was seeking interviews the ship was taken out to mid-stream in order that the customs, and immigration officers could have their inspections in daylight and that nome of the steeraee Passengers could get aishore.

When the reporter was through with his work he found himself a long way froni the dock. He went in search of the Captain, but that officer refused to put him ashore, saying ne did not believe the story, and suggested to put the newsgatherer in Irons as a stowaway. He was kept on board until next morning, when the United States Inspector recognized him and he was released. He is now wondering if the Captain did not play a joke on him in this detention.

Philadelphia Times

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