Browse The Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives Home Page

Great Lakes Navy Boot Camp Yearbook 1955 Company 275 - The Keel

1955 Company 275 Great Lakes US Naval Training Center Roster - The Keel

Roster for Recruit Company 275 for 1955, United States Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Illinois. Company Commander: R. J. FLUKER, QM1, 57 Men Graduated. Training commenced 13 June 1955 and concluded on 15 August 1955.

  • Graduation Review - Recruit Training Command Program
  • Resume of Flag Competition Program

COMPANY 275

Organization: 10 TH REGIMENT, 103 RD BATTALION

  • Commenced Training: 13 June 1955
  • Completed Training: 15 August 1955

Company 55-275 Commanders

  • LCDR K. W. Montz
    Brigade Commander

  • LT J. D. Sloan
    Regimental Commander
  • LTJG R. L. Ellison
    Battalion Commander
  • R. J. Fluker, QM1
    Company Commander

Company 55-275 Graduating Class Roster

  1. Arthur W. Haas
    ACPO
  2. James A. Fulton
    Honorman
  3. Roger E. Sandgren
    MAA
  4. Teddy J. Smothers
    Company Clerk
  5. James W. Aldrich
  6. Patrick D. Brainard
  7. Richard W. Brown
  8. Gerald E. Carvin
  9. Leroy J. Dautreuil
  10. Gary R. Degenhardt
  11. James Q. Evans
  12. Wayne 0. Fullford
  13. James Greene Jr.
  14. Wayne E. Harris
  15. Donald D. Hevelone
  16. John J. Hughes
  17. Hugha Isbell
  18. Jackie L. Jett
  19. Melvin D. Johnson
  20. Donald G. Kellerman
  21. Marvin G. Kintz
  22. Stanley Komosa
  23. Kenneth W. Kreutzer
  24. Carl D. Landwehr
  25. Kenneth Logan
  26. Donald E. Lytle
  27. Lucas McElveen
  28. Charles R. Miller
  29. Gerald J. Moslander
  30. Donald E. Munson
  31. Clarence J. Nosal
  32. Marvin R. Oliver
  33. Paul D. Opp
  34. Raymond E. Parnell
  35. John D. Patterson
  36. Lloyd W. Pauley
  37. Robert J. Pietenpol
  38. Jerry L. Polick
  39. Marvin E. Reynolds
  40. Errol A. Romero
  41. Joel R. Rule
  42. David J. Seibert
  43. Nicetas A. Selamakos
  44. Edman L. Sipe
  45. Dale W. Stephens
  46. John E. R. Suzor
  47. Roger W. Taylor
  48. Sam K. Taylor
  49. Donald L. Thomsen
  50. Alvin Wagner Jr.
  51. Albert J. Watts
  52. Randall S. Weales
  53. Donald L. Wilson
  54. Charles L. Wright
  55. Andrew L. Wydeck
  56. David J. Ziembicki
  57. W. F. Daniels

Graduation n Review

RECRUIT TRAINING COMMAND

U.S. NAVAL TRAINING CENTER
Great Lakes, Illinois
Captain J. B. Mclean,. USN
Commander,
Naval Training Center
Captain C. B. Jackson, Jr., USN
Commanding Officer,
Recruit Training Command
10 AM
REVIEWING OFFICER
Lieutenant General Hobart R. GAY, U. S. Army Commanding General, FIFTH Army Headquarters Chicago, Illinois
RECRUIT REGIMENTAL COMMANDERS
10th Regiment - A. BODENSCHATZ • Co. 318
12th Regiment - T. R. WILLIAMS ^ Co. 281
RECRUIT BATTALION COMMANDERS
101st Battalion G. W. FREASE ..o. Co. 299
102nd Battalion J. T. CHIMKO • Co. 297
103rd Battalion D. C. TURNER • Co. 284
104th Battalion - R. D. GULBRO .... Co. 272
121st Battalion T. A. MILLER oesio Co. 366
122nd Battalion - H. E. ThOMPSON .... Co. 282
123rd Battalion - L. E. LARSON so.* Co. 273
124th Battalion - R. D. LORENTZ **sip Co. 278
RECRUIT PETTY OFFICERS IN CHARGE OF COMPANIES AS INDICATED
GRADUATING COMPANIES - F. D. HEDDENS
269 - D. M. ULM 280 - C. R, MURRY
270 - C. A. PAKE 281 - P. G. GRIFFITH - E. MARTELL°, JR.
271 J. A. HYDE 282 G. L. OPPERMAN
272 J. E. HAXTON 283 H. L. GREENWELL, III
273 P. A. SLADOVNIK 284 - D. GENDEK
274 - V. PEDREGON 285 E. M. VENYARD
275 - Authur W. HAILS 286 - J. L. COTTON
276 - W. R. NEWSOME 287 - R. C. BRINSTER
277 - W. E. LARGENT 288 - WHITEMAN
278- N. MILTON 289 - K. A. KOZLOWSKI
279 - W. L. ALLEN 290 - M. J. PAULSON
NON-GRADUATING COMPANIES - K. C. FIETSAM
301 - M. L. WRAY 306 - D. L. CLYVA
302 - I. G• YOUNT, JR. 307 - J. P. WILSON
303 - R. V. NEELEY 308
304 - R. L. ROUTSONG 309
305 - iT. F4 BELL 310
PRESENTATION OF TEE RECRUITS of Troops
BRIGADE Buddy C. MURPHY Co. 270
SOUND OFF EXHIBITION EXHIBITION RECRUIT BAND
Drum Major - A. T. WILLIAMS Co. 310 RECRUIT DRILL TEAY
Drill Master - G. E. PETTERSON Co. 272 RECRUIT DRUM & BUGLE CORPS
Drum Major - J. D. CRAMER Co. 305
MANUAL OF ARNE The Recruit Battalions Co. 287
MARCH OTEAME COLOR Color Company
NATIONAL ANTHEM RECRUIT BAND
PRESENTATION OF TIE HONORMAY CERTIFICATES
BY Lieutenant GeneARMSHobart R. GAY, U. S. Army
HONORMEN
Kenneth E. GOEKE David O. LUCAS Glenn J. MARTIN John A. KUPER CHONORMANo. Co. 270 William Y. PEYER James L. BELCHER Doyle We MILLER George D. BYRES, Co. 280
271 Co. 281
272 Co. 282
JR. Co. 283
Walter G. CASNER Co. 273 Warner D. VICTORY Co. 284
Gerald W. HOME Co. 274 John D. HOWARD Co. 285
James A. FULTON Co. 275 James L. ALLEN Co. 286
Josoph F. LAMPE Co. 276 Paul D. RIPSOM Co. 287
Richard L. BAUER Co. 277 Frank J. BYORICK Co. 288
Robert E. NIEHAUS Co. 278 William J. DETERS CCe. 289
Edward (n) JACKSON 279 Leo D. LITTLE Co. 290
PRESENTATION OF THE AMERICAN SPIRIT
HONOR MEDAL
BY Lieutenant General Hobart R. GAY, U. S. Army
Dale Loon RONGSTAD Co. 276
PASS IN REVIEW THE BRIGADE
Welcome to 9, eat idea/
Great Lakes, one of the Navy's largest and best known training installations, welcomes you to its weekly military review! We are proud to present our Navy recruits in a ceremony rich in color and tradition, filled with stirring music and precise drill maneuvers.
The entire program Is conducted by recruits, none of whom have been in the Navy for more than ten weeks. That they are able to direct the Intricate maneuvers and exercise military control over the other recruits in the review is a distinct tribute to their abilities and to the training they have received here In such a brief period of time.
A Navy recruit's life is a busy one, and military drill is only a small part of it. He spends many classroom hours learning the basic principles of seamanship, gunnery, discipline, fire fighting and other naval subjects. He takes part in a health-building physical training program of organized athletics, swimming and calisthenics. More Important, he continues his training in Democracy through classes in citizenship and Naval history, through religious education In the faith of his choice and by learning to live with his shipmates in a spirit of team work and esprit de corps.
The review at Great Lakes, led by recruits only, is a weekly affirmation of the spirit of the modern Navy. It symbolizes both the self-reliance of the individual and the team work of the group.
each week one or more companies completes training, and the review is also a graduation ceremony. About half of the graduating recruits will go to schools for further specialized training; the rest will scatter to ships and stations around the world to take up their duties in fulfilling the Navy's mission.
You may well be proud of them. Your Navy is proud of them. As civilians they were America's finest young men and women, products of America's best homes, schools and churches. Now as Bluejackets they go to man the fleets and supporting bases, serving as guardians of our nation's peace and, if necessary, as Its first line defenders.
9ND-P-1322 (Rev 2-541 Navy—DPPO 9ND, Great lakes, Ill.

RESUME OF FLAG COMPETITION PROGRAM
The flags you see carried by the companies in this review are earned by them in competition with other recruit companies in all phases of recruit training. In addition to the privilege of carrying these flags with the company, the winning of them enables the company to obtain extra liberties. The competition for most of these flags is on a weekly basis with the winning company carrying the flag the following week.
Each company carries a blue flag with its company number in white numerals. All other flags are won in competition.
RECRUIT TRAINI NG
HALL OF FAME FLAG BLUE, YELLOWS RED ON WHITE
ROOSTER FLAG
RED 8 BLUE ON WHITE
The flag representing supreme achievement in recruit training, a flag won only by outstanding companies, is the Hall of Fame Flag. Only those companies which have demonstrated superiority in all phases of their training receive this flag. The winning of the flag is the highest honor that can be bestowed on a company during their period of training.
The flag competition program is divided into specific areas of training, and a flag is presented weekly to the company ranking highest in its competition group in each area. To be awarded the Hall of Fame Flag, a company must win the following flags: five Rooster Flags, two Regimental Military Drill Flags, three Star Flags, one "C" Flag, one "I" Flag, and one "A" Flag.
BRIGADE DRILL FLAG
BLUE,WHITE& RED
ON YELLOW
REGIMENTAL DRILL FLAG
YELLOW RED &WHITE
ON BLUE
BATTALION DRILL FLAG
BLUE,YELLOWS WHITE ON RED
These flags and the methods of winning each are described in succeeding paragraphs. In addition to the above listed flags, the company must not have ranked in the lower half of Its competition group more than one week after its second week in competition for either the "C" or the "I" Flag.
The highest weekly award is the Rooster Flag. The awarding of this flag is based upon the competition for all of the lesser flags. Credits are earned by each company in each of the specific areas, and the company in each regiment having the highest total for the week is awarded this flag. The five areas of training represented in the competition are military drill, cleanliness, citizenship, scholarship, and athletics.
Competition in military drill is divided into battalion, regimental, and brigade levels. In this area, companies learn close order drill, the manual of arms, physical drill under arms, and some semaphore signaling. The most important conditions that are developed in this area are learning to carry out commands immediately and learning to work together as a team. All companies within each battalion first compete for the battalion drill flags, then the winners of each
battalion competition compete for the regimental drill flags, and finally the regimental winners compete for a brigade drill flag. Points earned during all three competitions count toward the Rooster Flag.
The Star Flag competition emphasizes the recruit's cleanliness
and is based on inspections covering personal appearance, care of cloth-
ing, and condition of the barracks
and other designated cleaning
stations. Companies compete for
this flag in groups of from four
to ten companies. The total
points earned in this competition
// for the week also count toward
the Rooster Flag for that week.
The "C" Flag, which is awarded weekly to the company within each regiment which best displays the qualities of good citi-
YELLOW ON BLUE zenship, is determined by observ-
ation of recruits as they partici-
pate in various events in this
area.
Recruits may each contribute toward points for the "C" Flag in the fields where their interests are best suited. These fields, ranging from entertainment to military drill, include: band, drum and bugle corp, variety shows, efficiency in service week, drill team, and exceptional individual participation in any and all events. Points toward a "C" Flag may be obtained in this way, but lack of efficiency and cooperation in any of these areas may result in reduction of the points awarded.
The "I" Flag is awarded to the company within each regiment which demonstrates the highest scholastic ability in each week's course of Instruction. This flag to a large extent Indicates the degree of concentration which
STAR FLAG
"C" FLAG WHITE ON BLUE
each recruit has given his weekly instructions in the present training program. Tests are conducted each week on the basis of what the recruit has learned in the preceding week, and what he has assimilated in all previous instructions. On receiving these tests the recruits find that the questions asked are neither vague, nor abstract, but are in fact directly concerned with what the recruit has come in contact with in his Navy training.
Included with the preceding flags contributing toward the Rooster Flag is one which represents achievement and contribution in the field of sports. The "A" Flag is the flag which is won each week by the company in each regiment which accumulates the most points for participation in the scheduled contests in the week's athletic program. Each recruit has an opportunity to participate in the sport of his interest; since a varied schedule including rope-climbing, relay races, tug-of-war, boxing, swimming, and seasonal sports is offered.
You can see, therefore, that all phases of the recruit's development are covered by this award program: drill, cleanliness, citizenship, scholarship, and athletics. A man proficient in these five areas is a definite asset to both the Navy and his country throughout his entire enlistment. Such awards are not only the beginning of self confidence and military co-operation, but are in the largest sense indicative of the entire spirit and principle of the United States Navy.
9ND-P-1376 Navy—DPP() 9ND, Great Lakes. 111.

"I" FLAG
BLUE, RED,a YELLOW ON WHITE

"A" FLAG
WHITE ON BLUE

Images Available For This Recruit Company

Recruits, Page 1 Recruits, Page 2
Recruits, Page 1 Recruits, Page 2
Recruits, Page 3  
Recruits, Page 3  
Graduation Review, Page 1 Graduation Review, Page 2
Graduation Review, Page 1 Graduation Review, Page 2
Graduation Review, Page 3 Graduation Review, Page 4
Graduation Review, Page 3 Graduation Review, Page 4
Resume Of Flag Competition Program, Page 1 Resume Of Flag Competition Program, Page 2
Resume Of Flag Competition Program, Page 1 Resume Of Flag Competition Program, Page 2
Resume Of Flag Competition Program, Page 3 Resume Of Flag Competition Program, Page 4
Resume Of Flag Competition Program, Page 3 Resume Of Flag Competition Program, Page 4
Return to Top of Page

United States Naval Training Center - Great Lakes, IL Archive

Search The Archives

Google Custom Search

USNTC Great Lakes Graduation Books