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The Farragut Naval Training Station - History and Guide

The Farragut Naval Training Station - History and Guide

Illustrated Guide and History of the Naval Training Station located in Idaho

GREETINGS FROM THE COMMANDANT OF THE U. S. NAVAL TRAINING STATION — FARRAGUT, IDAHO

This booklet is dedicated to the men of the Navy who have gone before and to you future Men-o'-War's Men.

THE U. S. NAVAL TRAINING STATION, FARRAGUT, IDAHO, GREETS YOU.

We are one of the newest, and the second largest Naval Training Station in the United States. It should be a source of great pride to you, individually and collectively, to be a member of Farragut's personnel.

WE ARE ENGAGED IN AN ALL-OUT WAR.

Today, the world is engaged in one of the greatest conflicts ever recorded in the pages of history. And, of necessity, the United States is building one of the greatest military organizations the world has ever known. Many generations of fighting men have built one of the mast outstanding fighting groups of the present war . . . .

THE NAVY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

We have three things to do immediately-

First—CATCH UP to where we should have been;

Second—HOLD what we have while preparing to advance;

Third—ADVANCE and keep on advancing.

THE SUCCESSFUL AND EFFICIENT FUNCTIONING OF ANY ORGANIZATION, NO MATTER HOW LARGE OR SMALL, IS ENTIRELY DEPENDENT ON THE LOYALTY, INITIATIVE, AND INTELLIGENT COOPERATION OF EVERY PERSON IN IT.

Navy men—must be fighting men—with a fighting spirit. The foundations of the Navy are based on honor and integrity, discipline and obedience; and, while you are a Navy man, it is your duty to live up to the Navy's traditions by your every act.

NEVER FORGET—Every station, office, and activity ashore exists but to serve the NAVY afloat, under the seas, and in the air.

Yours is a great responsibility.
Captain, U. S. Navy, Commandant.

THE Commandants
CAPTAIN F. H. KELLEY, U.S.N.

PAST

U.S.N.
REAR-ADMIRAL I. C. SOWELL,
HOME OF FARRAGUT NAVAL TRAINING STATION ON LAKE PEND OREILLE
IN THE MOUNTAINS OF IDAHO . . .

THE FIRST ADMIRAL OF THE U. S. NAVY

ADMIRAL DAVID G. FARRAGUT (1801 - 1870)

The name "Farragut" was chosen for this station by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Commander-In-Chief of all U. S. Armed Forces. No greater tribute could be paid to the First Admiral . . . . No greater inspiration to the men who serve after him.

David Glascow Farragut started his career as a midshipman at the age of nine. He commanded a prize with ability when only twelve years old. In 1824 he was in command of the U.S.S. Ferret. He was Rear-Admiral in 1862, Vice-Admiral in 1864, and Admiral in 1866—the first full Admiral of the U. S. Navy—an office created for him by Congress.

Somewhat under middle height, of unusual strength, agile, athletic, and a skilled swordsman, he was easily approachable, yet in his bearing there was dignity without stiffness.

Early in 1862 Farragut was appointed to the Command of the West Gulf Blocading Squadron with orders to .... proceed up the Mississippi River and reduce the defenses which guard the approach to New Orleans . . . ."

Before dawn on the morning of August 5, 1864, he issued his carefully planned orders to the Captains of the fleet of fourteen wooden ships, four iron clad monitors, and ten small gun boats. First in line was the heavily armed "Brooklyn," followed by the Admiral's "Hartford." One of the leading monitors, the "Tecumseh," in her anxiety to engage the enemy, crossed the mine field, struck a torpedo and sank within a few minutes.

This was the great moment of Farragut's life. Without a moment's hesitation he swung his own ship clear of the hesitating "Brooklyn" and shouted, "DAMN THE TORPEDOES .. . . FULL SPEED AHEAD," and anchored triumphantly above the fort.

When President Roosevelt made his secret nation-wide inspection tour of war activities early in the fall of 1942, one of his major stops was the U. S. Naval Training Station at Farragut, Idaho. Leaving his private car on September 21, 1942, the President traveled by auto throughout the areas of the Station, which was formally established just six days prior, and still under construction.

Shown with the President in the above picture, taken on the station during the inspection, are Captain I. C. Sowell (now Rear-Admiral), U.S.N. Commandant; Rear-Admiral Ross McIntyre, the President's private physician; and Governor Chase A. Clark, then Governor of Idaho.

CAPT. J. G. ATKINS, U.S.N. Executive Officer, was also Acting Commandant during the interim of Admiral Sowell's detachment and Capt. Kelley's arrival.

LT. COM. J. E. WILSON, U.S.N. (Ref.)
Training Officer

CAMP WALDRON
LT.-COM. J. C. WALDRON, U.S.N.

Camp Waldron, the third camp to be commissioned, and the first on the right of Farragut Boulevard, honors the late Lieutenant-Commander John Charles Waldron, U.S.N., who was the Commander of the famous Torpedo Squadron 8. Lieutenant-Commander Waldron led his squadron of 30 men and 15 planes against the Jap fleet during the Battle of Midway, an action credited as establishing the turning point in this engagement. From their attack only one member of the squadron, Ensign Gay, and no planes, returned. For his heroism he was awarded, posthumously, the Distinguished Service Cross. The Camp was officially opened November 8, 1942.

CAMP WADI)
JAMES RICHARD WARD, S I/c, U.S.N.

During the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, when it became apparent that the U.S.S. Oklahoma was about to capsize, there came an order to abandon ship. One man, J. Richard Ward, Seaman First Class, calmly remained at his turret post, ignoring his own safety. He was holding a flashlight so that the rest of the men in his turret crew might see to escape. Ward died, saving his shipmates, and was later awarded, posthumously, the Congressional Medal of Honor.

In selecting the name Ward for the second area on the right of Farragut Boulevard, the Executive Officers of Farragut chose one whose deeds will always serve as a high standard towards which the "Boots" of Ward will never cease to strive.

The Camp was officially opened October 6, 1942.

1940s Booklet: United States Naval Training Station, Farragut, Idaho, Captain F. A. Kelley, U.S. Navy, Commandant. Information on Camp Waldron - Opened 8 Nov 1942; Camp Ward - Opened 6 Oct 1942; Camp Bennion - Opened 15 Sep 1942; Camp Hill - Opened 2 Dec 1942; Camp Peterson - Opened 25 Mar 1943; Camp Scott - Opened 19 Dec 1942. Remainder of booklet has scenes of the USNTC including buildings, receiving new recruits, daily activities, recreation building, Shops, Cobbler, Tailer, Photograph, Mess Hall, Physical Exercises and Drills, Dispensary, Dentist, Sick Bay, U. S. Naval Hospital, Operating Room, Hospital Ward; Ougoing unit; Signalman School; Radio School; Quartermaster School; Main Post Office, Hostess House, Rifle Range, C.P.O. Recreation, Central Auditorium.

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